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Hannibal Transcript, Hannibal's Wife?

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  • IrenesBooks@aol.com
    The correct transcript is this: http://www.egroups.com/files/Roman_History_Books/hannibal2.htm We talked about whether or not Hannibal was married and had a
    Message 1 of 1 , May 11, 2000
      The correct transcript is this:
      http://www.egroups.com/files/Roman_History_Books/hannibal2.htm

      We talked about whether or not Hannibal was married and had a son. Our member
      "eclectic" checked Lancel: Serge Lancel in his "Hannibal", who discusses
      this. She is called "Similce" in the Leckie novel, Imilce in Lancel's
      biography. So there may have been a wife, but whether there was a son, seems
      even more doubtful.

      Lancel: "...It may be remembered that [Hannibal's] predecessor, Hasdrubal the
      Fair, had taken a Spanish woman as his second wife, soon after succeeding
      Hamilcar. In the same way, we learn from Livy (XXIV, 41, 7) that Hannibal
      married an Iberian woman from Castulo, one of the most important cities at
      that time in upper Andalusia, near Linares. Very early on the town had
      aroused the interest of the Phoenicians of Gades because of its mineral
      resources, and its ancient wealth had found expression in some of the most
      beautiful works of orientalizing art. Silius Italicus tells us a little more
      about the bride. She was called Imilce, not from a Greek name as the Latin
      poet thinks (Punica, 111, 97-105), but from a well and truly Punic name: it
      is quite legitimate to recognize in it the barely modified Semitic root mlk,
      the 'chief, the 'king' (Picard, 1967, p. 119). In contrast, it appears harder
      to follow Silius any further in his romantic elaborations. Supposedly from
      this union a son was born, before the very walls of besieged Saguntum. Before
      leaving for Italy, Hannibal took the mother and still young child to Gades,
      where he put them on a vessel bound for Carthage, to protect them from the
      vicissitudes of war. And the poet shows us this Imilce, fixing her gaze on
      the shores of Spain until the ship's progress hides them from her sight. "

      Livy apparently only has a brief sentence: "Castulo, a powerful and famous
      city of Spain, and in such close alliance with Carthage that Hannibal took a
      wife from there, seceded to Rome."

      Of Silius Italicus, I found this: " Silius Italicus : The Punica:
      Silius' Punica is the longest Latin poem to come down to us, a historical
      epic in 12,200 verses (17 books) recounting the events of the Second Punic
      War. The poem begins with Hannibal's oath and, except for digressions on
      Regulus and Anna, follows events in order until Scipio's triumph after Zama.
      Silius' main source was Livy, but the work also encounters Ennius, Virgil and
      Lucan. The work positions itself as the 'middle' work in the "Roman Trilogy"
      of the Aeneid, Punica and Bellum Civile. The work is at once a celebration of
      an ideal past and a realisation that the seeds of later changes were always
      there in the nature of Rome : both Scipio and the ambitious Hannibal
      prefigure later Roman rulers.

      For latinists, here is a text:
      http://www.gmu.edu/departments/fld/CLASSICS/silius.html

      Irene
      http://members.xoom.com/placida/
      Co-host, Ancient/Classical History Forum
      http://www.delphi.com/ab-ancienthist/start
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