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Food for Thougth on Hannibal

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  • IrenesBooks@aol.com
    Of the modern books on Hannibal that I read recently, I most enjoyed the Baker and the Lancel. Here are the final words from Lancel: …Just as the war he
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 4, 2000
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      Of the modern books on Hannibal that I read recently, I most enjoyed the
      Baker and the Lancel.

      Here are the final words from Lancel:

      "…Just as the war he waged against Rome was the first world war, its leader
      was the first international hero the world had ever known. He was
      international not only for the breadth of his field of action, which extended
      to the Orient during his time in exile. Even though he left a trace rather
      than a heritage, Hannibal is greater than Alexander in that he was not
      enclosed in a single culture. Perhaps, thanks to Hannibal's exceptional
      calibre as a leader and his genius as a strategist - which made such an
      impression on past centuries - our own period has become alive to the
      polyvalence of a human experience in which so many facets of the ancient
      Mediterranean are superimposed. And all this during a lifetime that was
      fairly short, when all is said and done. The most famous Carthaginian is a
      paradox because, apart from his early childhood, he spent only a few short
      years in Carthage, and of those years tradition retains only the year of his
      suffetate for certain. Nevertheless, his acquaintance in his youth with
      Iberian societies and cultures, then his approach to the Celtic world and,
      lastly and chiefly, the strong attraction that must have been exerted on him
      by the Campanian and Samnite lands, the Greek towns of southern Italy, and
      later the cities of the Hellenized East, never erased his feeling of
      belonging to a native culture, to a religion that remained original and
      strict despite external contributions, or his loyalty to his Punic homeland.
      Rome would have to wait until Hadrian acceded to the empire before it finally
      found a son who, like Hannibal, would combine both pietas and a sense of the
      universal."
      ----------------
      As to the recent annoyance by eGroups: They sent me an apology which I
      herewith pass on, and I wish to thank all those of you who sent me kind words
      of support.

      Irene
      http://members.xoom.com/placida/
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