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Re: [Roman_History_Books] An Interesting Book Review

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  • ALBERT NOYER
    Hi Jack; Hey, you didn t mention my books... The critically acclaimed historical mystery must-reads, etc, etc. Just kidding, naturally, and where was this
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 6, 2006
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      Hi Jack;
      Hey, you didn't mention my books..."The critically acclaimed historical mystery must-reads, etc, etc."
      Just kidding, naturally, and where was this review of 69 AD ? -- which, of course, should be titled A.D. 69. I think it was listed in the History Book Club, but that's not my era so didn't want to waste my bonus points on getting it. Neither is Hadrian's but, as I told you, I found Following Hadrian in a remnant catalog.
      As to reading the finished manuscript "If it [the day] ever comes," critique groups don't work that way, but chapter by chapter. So sent along a chapter here and there, in between your automotive industry commentaries. Ars Longa, vita (and maybe the US auto industry) brevis...?"
      Looking forward to the day.
      Albert
      PS "Do-gooders?" By all the accounts I've read, Domitian got exactly what he deserved... re: Tacitus Agricola.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: jacklifton@...
      Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 10:40 AM
      To: Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Roman_History_Books] An Interesting Book Review

      I'm an aficionado of the period and the events, which the book, 69AD,
      describes. Unfortunately the reviewer is not, not do I think that the reviewer
      actually read the book very carefully.

      Vespasian was succeeded by his son, called Titus by historians-he actually
      had the exact same name sequence of praenomen, nomen, and cognomen as his
      father, a Roman aristocratic practice. Titus who may well have shared power with his
      father during his father's reign lasted as sole ruler only two years , not
      12, as the review says, and died young in 81. He in turn was succeeded by his
      younger brother who we call Domitian. He reigned until 96 AD, when he was
      assassinated by do-gooders, according to the accounts that have come down to us. A
      short reign followed by the elderly Nerva, and then the empire entered its
      final golden era of military expansion under the younger Trajan whose father had
      served (as a legate, i.e., general) with Vespasian in the pre-Flavian dynastic
      period.

      Vespasian was in my opinion the most important Roman emperor after Augustus.
      He was a businessman and a non-sybarite. He made the family money by managing
      a business selling mules to the army, served in Britannia brilliantly and
      courageously, was a suffect Consul in 51, thereafter a governor of Africa, and
      later on the commander of the largest field army Rome had put under one man since
      the time of Augustus. Vespasian used this force to put down the Jewish
      rebellion that broke out in 66AD, and let his (then) 31 year old son, Titus, lay
      siege to Jerusalem, take it, and destroy the Second Temple in 70. Vespasian and
      his older son were the most accomplished and prepared men to lead the empire
      since the great Prince, Augustus, himself. The footings that they prepared led
      to a century long golden age for Rome and its patrician and citizen classes.

      If you want dry facts read Barbara Levick's late 1990s biography,
      "Vespasian."

      If you want to be entertained then wait for my biographical novel of the
      great man alos to be entitled "Vespasian." My (email) friend Albert Noyer gets to
      read and criticize it first when that day comes that it is finished, if it
      ever comes.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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    • Irene Hahn
      Your books, Albert: The Secundus Papyrus http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1592640346/stamfordhistoric The Cybelene Conspiracy
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 6, 2006
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        Your books, Albert:

        The Secundus Papyrus
        http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1592640346/stamfordhistoric
        The Cybelene Conspiracy
        http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1592640338/stamfordhistoric

        ;-)

        Irene


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "ALBERT NOYER" <anoyer@...>
        To: <Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 2:39 PM
        Subject: Re: [Roman_History_Books] An Interesting Book Review


        > Hi Jack;
        > Hey, you didn't mention my books..."The critically acclaimed historical
        mystery must-reads, etc, etc."
        > Just kidding, naturally, and where was this review of 69 AD ? -- which, of
        course, should be titled A.D. 69. I think it was listed in the History Book
        Club, but that's not my era so didn't want to waste my bonus points on
        getting it. Neither is Hadrian's but, as I told you, I found Following
        Hadrian in a remnant catalog.
        > As to reading the finished manuscript "If it [the day] ever comes,"
        critique groups don't work that way, but chapter by chapter. So sent along
        a chapter here and there, in between your automotive industry commentaries.
        Ars Longa, vita (and maybe the US auto industry) brevis...?"
        > Looking forward to the day.
        > Albert
        > PS "Do-gooders?" By all the accounts I've read, Domitian got exactly what
        he deserved... re: Tacitus Agricola.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: jacklifton@...
        > Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 10:40 AM
        > To: Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [Roman_History_Books] An Interesting Book Review
        >
        > I'm an aficionado of the period and the events, which the book, 69AD,
        > describes. Unfortunately the reviewer is not, not do I think that the
        reviewer
        > actually read the book very carefully.
        >
        > Vespasian was succeeded by his son, called Titus by historians-he actually
        > had the exact same name sequence of praenomen, nomen, and cognomen as his
        > father, a Roman aristocratic practice. Titus who may well have shared
        power with his
        > father during his father's reign lasted as sole ruler only two years , not
        > 12, as the review says, and died young in 81. He in turn was succeeded by
        his
        > younger brother who we call Domitian. He reigned until 96 AD, when he was
        > assassinated by do-gooders, according to the accounts that have come down
        to us. A
        > short reign followed by the elderly Nerva, and then the empire entered its
        > final golden era of military expansion under the younger Trajan whose
        father had
        > served (as a legate, i.e., general) with Vespasian in the pre-Flavian
        dynastic
        > period.
        >
        > Vespasian was in my opinion the most important Roman emperor after
        Augustus.
        > He was a businessman and a non-sybarite. He made the family money by
        managing
        > a business selling mules to the army, served in Britannia brilliantly and
        > courageously, was a suffect Consul in 51, thereafter a governor of Africa,
        and
        > later on the commander of the largest field army Rome had put under one
        man since
        > the time of Augustus. Vespasian used this force to put down the Jewish
        > rebellion that broke out in 66AD, and let his (then) 31 year old son,
        Titus, lay
        > siege to Jerusalem, take it, and destroy the Second Temple in 70.
        Vespasian and
        > his older son were the most accomplished and prepared men to lead the
        empire
        > since the great Prince, Augustus, himself. The footings that they prepared
        led
        > to a century long golden age for Rome and its patrician and citizen
        classes.
        >
        > If you want dry facts read Barbara Levick's late 1990s biography,
        > "Vespasian."
        >
        > If you want to be entertained then wait for my biographical novel of the
        > great man alos to be entitled "Vespasian." My (email) friend Albert Noyer
        gets to
        > read and criticize it first when that day comes that it is finished, if it
        > ever comes.
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        > Visit your group "Roman_History_Books" on the web.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > Roman_History_Books-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • jacklifton@aol.com
        Albert, I m sorry that I didn t mention your very interesting, well written, and period-perfect novels, but they are set in a Rome far in the future from AD
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 6, 2006
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          Albert,

          I'm sorry that I didn't mention your very interesting, well written, and
          period-perfect novels, but they are set in a Rome far in the future from AD 69. To
          answer your question, I don't know who wrote the book the review of which
          started this thread, but I think that the review was in the Historical Novel
          Society publication called the Sole(a?)nder. In any case the original popular
          history book of this period that is good is 1989's "The Year of the Four Emperors"
          by Kenneth Wellesley, which now has a "new" introduction by Barbara Levick
          and was reissued in paperback in 2000 by Routeldge.

          Off topic-My "China Price Strategy" article's main theme was picked up by the
          Detroit News and published today by a journalist as entirely his own work.
          Who said that ..." imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"... I am
          flattered.

          Jack


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Irene Hahn
          Jack, there is a novel I like: Nero s Heirs by Allan Massie. My review: http://romanhistorybooksandmore.freeservers.com/r_neroheirs.htm. Irene ... From:
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 6, 2006
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            Jack,

            there is a novel I like: "Nero's Heirs" by Allan Massie. My review:
            http://romanhistorybooksandmore.freeservers.com/r_neroheirs.htm.

            Irene
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <jacklifton@...>
            To: <Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 4:29 PM
            Subject: Re: [Roman_History_Books] An Interesting Book Review


            > Albert,
            >
            > I'm sorry that I didn't mention your very interesting, well written, and
            > period-perfect novels, but they are set in a Rome far in the future from
            AD 69. To
            > answer your question, I don't know who wrote the book the review of which
            > started this thread, but I think that the review was in the Historical
            Novel
            > Society publication called the Sole(a?)nder. In any case the original
            popular
            > history book of this period that is good is 1989's "The Year of the Four
            Emperors"
            > by Kenneth Wellesley, which now has a "new" introduction by Barbara Levick
            > and was reissued in paperback in 2000 by Routeldge.
            >
            > Off topic-My "China Price Strategy" article's main theme was picked up by
            the
            > Detroit News and published today by a journalist as entirely his own work.
            > Who said that ..." imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"... I am
            > flattered.
            >
            > Jack
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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