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Suggestions for Next Batch of Reading

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  • vlc2_sims
    Last night we were talking about what we should read during the first half of 2006, after Rome and the Mediterranean by Livy. I can t remember them all, but
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 3, 2005
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      Last night we were talking about what we should read during the first
      half of 2006, after "Rome and the Mediterranean" by Livy. I can't
      remember them all, but here's what I do remember.

      G.P. Baker: SULLA THE FORTUNATE
      G.P. Baker: AUGUSTUS
      David Wishart: some Marcus Corvinus mystery
      Rosemary Rowe: some Libertus mystery
      Plautus: Roman comedies, esp. "Pseudolus" which was the basis for "A
      Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," see this About
      article - http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa101497.htm

      And here are the left-over suggestions from earlier this year.

      Fiction

      Marguerite Yourcenar: MEMOIRS OF HADRIAN
      Winifred Bryher: THE COIN OF CARTHAGE
      Rex Warner: THE YOUNG CAESAR
      Mika Waltari: THE ROMAN
      Alfred Leo Duggan: THE LITTLE EMPERORS
      Gustave Flaubert: SALAMMBO (etext available online)
      http://www.classicreader.com/booktoc.php/sid.1/bookid.631/
      Wilkie Collins: ANTONINA (etext available online)
      http://www.wilkie-collins.com/antonina-the-fall-of-rome/
      John Masefield: BASILISSA
      Evelyn Waugh: HELENA
      William Golding: THE DOUBLE TONGUE
      John Hersey: THE CONSPIRACY
      Anthony Burgess: THE KINGDOM OF THE WICKED

      Non-fiction

      Plutarch/Shakespeare: CORIOLANUS
      Suetonius: THE TWELVE CAESARS
      Mommsen: A HISTORY OF ROME UNDER THE EMPERORS
      Christian Meier: CAESAR
      Marcus Tullius Cicero: DE OFFICIIS (etext available online)
      http://www.constitution.org/rom/de_officiis.htm
      Arthur D. Kahn: THE EDUCATION OF JULIUS CAESAR
      Erik Hildinger: SWORDS AGAINST THE SENATE
      Edith Hamilton: THE ROMAN WAY

      Please add your own requests, don't be bashful.

      Vicki
      aka vlcroman
    • Cline, Vicki
      Sorry the formatting got messed up, hope this is more readable. ... Last night we were talking about what we should read during the first half of 2006, after
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 3, 2005
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        Sorry the formatting got messed up, hope this is more readable.

        -----Original Message-----

        Last night we were talking about what we should read during the first
        half of 2006, after "Rome and the Mediterranean" by Livy. I can't
        remember them all, but here's what I do remember.

        G.P. Baker: SULLA THE FORTUNATE
        G.P. Baker: AUGUSTUS
        David Wishart: some Marcus Corvinus mystery
        Rosemary Rowe: some Libertus mystery
        Plautus: Roman comedies, esp. "Pseudolus" which was the basis for "A
        Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," see this About article -
        http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa101497.htm

        And here are the left-over suggestions from earlier this year.

        Fiction

        Marguerite Yourcenar: MEMOIRS OF HADRIAN
        Winifred Bryher: THE COIN OF CARTHAGE
        Rex Warner: THE YOUNG CAESAR
        Mika Waltari: THE ROMAN
        Alfred Leo Duggan: THE LITTLE EMPERORS
        Gustave Flaubert: SALAMMBO (etext available online)
        http://www.classicreader.com/booktoc.php/sid.1/bookid.631/
        Wilkie Collins: ANTONINA (etext available online)
        http://www.wilkie-collins.com/antonina-the-fall-of-rome/
        John Masefield: BASILISSA
        Evelyn Waugh: HELENA
        William Golding: THE DOUBLE TONGUE
        John Hersey: THE CONSPIRACY
        Anthony Burgess: THE KINGDOM OF THE WICKED

        Non-fiction

        Plutarch/Shakespeare: CORIOLANUS
        Suetonius: THE TWELVE CAESARS
        Mommsen: A HISTORY OF ROME UNDER THE EMPERORS
        Christian Meier: CAESAR Marcus Tullius
        Cicero: DE OFFICIIS (etext available online)
        http://www.constitution.org/rom/de_officiis.htm
        Arthur D. Kahn: THE EDUCATION OF JULIUS CAESAR
        Erik Hildinger: SWORDS AGAINST THE SENATE
        Edith Hamilton: THE ROMAN WAY

        Please add your own requests, don't be bashful.

        Vicki
        aka vlcroman
      • Irene Hahn
        Added to this: David Anthony Durham: Pride of Carthage I can t remember that we mentioned Baker s Augustus . More to come! Irene Roman History Reading Group
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 3, 2005
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          Added to this:
          David Anthony Durham: Pride of Carthage
          I can't remember that we mentioned Baker's "Augustus".
          More to come!

          Irene

          Roman History Reading Group
          http://romanhistorybooksandmore.freeservers.com
          Member of Literature Reading Circle
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LiteratureReadingCircle/
          Cohost, Ancient Classical History Forum
          http://ancienthistory.about.com/mpboards.htm
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: vlc2_sims
          To: Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2005 5:20 PM
          Subject: [Roman_History_Books] Suggestions for Next Batch of Reading


          Last night we were talking about what we should read during the first
          half of 2006, after "Rome and the Mediterranean" by Livy. I can't
          remember them all, but here's what I do remember.

          G.P. Baker: SULLA THE FORTUNATE
          G.P. Baker: AUGUSTUS
          David Wishart: some Marcus Corvinus mystery
          Rosemary Rowe: some Libertus mystery
          Plautus: Roman comedies, esp. "Pseudolus" which was the basis for "A
          Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," see this About
          article - http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa101497.htm

          And here are the left-over suggestions from earlier this year.

          Fiction

          Marguerite Yourcenar: MEMOIRS OF HADRIAN
          Winifred Bryher: THE COIN OF CARTHAGE
          Rex Warner: THE YOUNG CAESAR
          Mika Waltari: THE ROMAN
          Alfred Leo Duggan: THE LITTLE EMPERORS
          Gustave Flaubert: SALAMMBO (etext available online)
          http://www.classicreader.com/booktoc.php/sid.1/bookid.631/
          Wilkie Collins: ANTONINA (etext available online)
          http://www.wilkie-collins.com/antonina-the-fall-of-rome/
          John Masefield: BASILISSA
          Evelyn Waugh: HELENA
          William Golding: THE DOUBLE TONGUE
          John Hersey: THE CONSPIRACY
          Anthony Burgess: THE KINGDOM OF THE WICKED

          Non-fiction

          Plutarch/Shakespeare: CORIOLANUS
          Suetonius: THE TWELVE CAESARS
          Mommsen: A HISTORY OF ROME UNDER THE EMPERORS
          Christian Meier: CAESAR
          Marcus Tullius Cicero: DE OFFICIIS (etext available online)
          http://www.constitution.org/rom/de_officiis.htm
          Arthur D. Kahn: THE EDUCATION OF JULIUS CAESAR
          Erik Hildinger: SWORDS AGAINST THE SENATE
          Edith Hamilton: THE ROMAN WAY

          Please add your own requests, don't be bashful.

          Vicki
          aka vlcroman






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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ptobey@aol.com
          ... These two I have and would reread them, as it s been a while. Since I m watching the Rome series, I ve been thinking of rereading Meier s book. ... Pam in
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 3, 2005
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            > I have all of Rowe's and all of Wishart, except for the latest book, which
            > I haven't yet ordered. I haven't found Wishart over here in the US, but I
            > order those from Amazon dot com. I saw Rosebary Rowe the other day at Barnes &
            > Noble.
            > David Wishart: some Marcus Corvinus mystery
            > Rosemary Rowe: some Libertus mystery
            >
            These two I have and would reread them, as it's been a while. Since I'm
            watching the Rome series, I've been thinking of rereading Meier's book.
            > Non-fiction
            > Christian Meier: CAESAR Marcus Tullius
            > Edith Hamilton: THE ROMAN WAY
            >
            Pam in DC


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • ptobey@aol.com
            I must say that I d NOT add to the list the 4 Emperor books by Conn Iggulden. He takes the facts of Caesar s life and changes them all up and down to suit the
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 3, 2005
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              I must say that I'd NOT add to the list the 4 Emperor books by Conn Iggulden.
              He takes the facts of Caesar's life and changes them all up and down to suit
              the story the way he has written it, and not the way it really happened. It
              was quite annoying. He killed Marius in a different way at a different time, had
              Marcus Brutus as his best friend from childhood, changed the wives, changed
              battles and their order, etc.
              Pam


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jacklifton@aol.com
              Pam, I think Meir s book is just called Caesar. In any case the praenomen and nomen Marcus Tullius belong to the politician/statesman/writer whose cognomen
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 3, 2005
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                Pam,

                I think Meir's book is just called "Caesar."

                In any case the praenomen and nomen Marcus Tullius belong to the
                politician/statesman/writer whose cognomen was CICERO, not CAESAR.

                Jack Lifton


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • ptobey@aol.com
                Hi Jack, I know Meier s book is Caesar. I have it. The other to which I referred was a series by Conn Iggulden called the Emperor series . The books are
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 4, 2005
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                  Hi Jack,
                  I know Meier's book is Caesar. I have it. The other to which I referred was
                  a series by Conn Iggulden called the Emperor series\. The books are about
                  Caesar's life as this author changed it to what he decided it would be, not as it
                  was. He has Marcus Junius Brutus ( I forgot the Junius in my post), the one
                  who was instrumental in the stabbing of Caesar on the Ides of Mars and son of
                  Servilia , as his best friend in childhood. No referral to Cicero was meant.
                  :-)
                  Pam :-)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • vlc2_sims
                  ... Added Durham to the list - I ll accumulate all the suggestions. I think I mentioned Augustus in passing when we were talking about Sulla the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 4, 2005
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                    --- In Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com, Irene Hahn
                    <irenesbooks@o...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Added to this:
                    > David Anthony Durham: Pride of Carthage
                    > I can't remember that we mentioned Baker's "Augustus".
                    > More to come!
                    >
                    > Irene
                    >

                    Added Durham to the list - I'll accumulate all the suggestions. I
                    think I mentioned "Augustus" in passing when we were talking
                    about "Sulla the Fortunate." Maybe one by Baker is enough for the next
                    set of books.

                    Vicki
                    aka vlcroman
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