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Re: Life after Justinian, Poll

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  • Jimmyjb
    Irene Might I commend to your readers as background reading a readily available paperback re-issue of a 1929 popular history of Hannibal and his epoch. It is
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 7, 2000
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      Irene

      Might I commend to your readers as background reading a readily available
      paperback
      re-issue of a 1929 popular history of Hannibal and his epoch. It is simply titled
      _Hannibal_. The author is George P. Baker, a noted author "for the educated
      masses" on historical and biographical "greats", "turning points" etc. The
      reissue is by Cooper Square Press in New York.
      It is available through Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble at $16.95. I like it because
      the
      author sticks closely to Polybius and Livy, arguing with them (with easy and
      unintrusive footnotes) where necessary, trying to resolve contradictions and yet
      telling an interesting tale.
      He tried to be "conversational" rather than academic/hedging in tone but his
      expression is
      somewhat keyed to the 1920s. It's like a well-read grandparent telling you a tale
      that has always fascinated him or her. I prefer it to Leonard Cottrell because
      Cottrell seems to speculate a lot without any references, just based on the fact
      that he has been over the ground and is
      an amateur archaeologist.

      I just reviewed the book for a list-server H-Net (the History net), a subdivision
      called H-War.
      My review should appear in late January or early February.

      Best,
      Jim Bloom



      IrenesBooks@... wrote:

      >
      > Now: What to read after Justinian:
      >
      > We could mix in a bit of Plutarch and Polybius and read as far as the Punic
      > wars.
      >
      > The first available fiction is on Hannibal and Scipio Africanus, two books by
      > Ross Leckie: "Hannibal: A Novel" (both hardcover & paperback) and "Scipio
      > Africanus: The Man who defeated Hannibal". There is a lot of background
      > reading available of that period for those of you who have a good public
      > library or a pocketbook of plenty.
      >
    • DTibbe2926@xxx.xxx
      Hi there,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 7, 2000
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        Hi there,

        << "The Etruscan" by the Finnish author Waltari. It's heavily out of print.
        Also, I read it recently and have to say that this is the weirdest book I
        have read in a long time! >>

        Never thought I'd ever see Waltari mentioned. Has anyone read his book 'The
        Roman'? Set in 1st century AD. Interesting if a little farfetched.

        Though not my area of interest I'd go with Livy.

        Keep up the good work

        David the Lurker
      • MarkowitzH@xxx.xxx
        Irene: Good news on combining groups. I will be back with the discussion group when it next meets, I hope, and look forward to hearing familiar voices
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 7, 2000
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          Irene:

          Good news on combining groups. I will be back with the discussion group when
          it next meets, I hope, and look forward to hearing familiar voices (reading
          familiar names?).

          My vote is for Livy, but I will go along with the crowd.

          Another good paperback reference on the Etruscans, also out of print I
          believe, is "The Etruscans in the Ancient World" by Von Vacano (Indiana
          University Press, LC number 60-16881). Reprinted at least once by St.
          Martin's Press.

          Hal
        • IrenesBooks@xxx.xxx
          Thank you for the recommendation, Jim! I ll look into it. Irene
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 7, 2000
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            Thank you for the recommendation, Jim! I'll look into it.

            Irene
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