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New Roman history novel

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  • Boris Raymond
    Having just found your group, I wanted to let you folks know of my recent book, THE TWELFTH VULTURE OF ROMULUS, and of my website. The Twelfth Vulture of
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 5, 2003
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      Having just found your group, I wanted to let you folks know of my
      recent book, THE TWELFTH VULTURE OF ROMULUS, and of my website.

      The Twelfth Vulture of Romulus: Attila and the Fall of Rome
      by Boris Raymond

      Publication date: June 2003 by KLYO Press ISBN 0-9730534-0-2
      P.O. Box 33053 Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3L 4T6
      Website: http://is.dal.ca/~braymond

      This historical novel recreates the principal events that led to
      the collapse of the Roman empire, and paved the way for a transformation
      of the western European culture from one obsessed with a pursuit of
      sensuality, wealth and power to one focussed on a search for spiritual
      salvation. The book's exploration of the gulf between self -centered
      hedonism and moral responsibility is particularly relevant to today's
      world.
      The events that dominated the last years of the western Roman
      empire are based on a fictive manuscript written by the grandson of
      Cassiodorus Aurelius, chief of the Imperial Secret Service and ambassador
      to Attila during the reign of Valentinian III. The story begins in AD 448,
      at the onset of the Century of the Twelfth Vulture when, according to an
      ancient prophesy made to its founder, Romulus, his city would fall. It
      ends in AD 476 when the last emperor of Rome, a thirteen-year-old boy,
      coincidentally also named Romulus, is dethroned by a barbarian.
      The opening takes place amid social and political turmoil:
      Germanic tribes are infiltrating the empire's porous frontiers, and alien
      generals are taking command of its remaining legions. Attila the Hun
      threatens invasion. A small group of patriots, calling itself the Phoenix
      Circle, focuses its efforts on the restoration of the empire through all
      available means. Others seek Rome's rebirth through an increase in the
      power of the Papacy; still others in the efficacy of empathy and prayer.
      The epic strives to portray in detail the major events of the period as
      well as to lend immediacy to the lives of people of that era. The idea
      for the story first originated while the author was researching early
      monastic transcription practices when preparing lectures for a course on
      the history of libraries. The earliest center for such activity was the
      monastery of the Vivarium on the southern tip of Italy, founded by
      Cassiodorus Aurelius.
      Boris Raymond began his university studies at the University of
      California (Berkeley). After service in the United States army in Europe
      during World War II, he returned to earn masters degrees in sociology,
      librarianship, and history. He holds a doctoral degree from the
      University of Chicago. From 1974 until his retirement, Raymond taught at
      Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada.

      Price: (incl. tax and postage) U.S.$ 15.75; Can$ 23.75

      P.S. I still have a few complimentary copies left for anyone who would
      be willing to write a brief review of the novel for this group. If
      interested, please post me your name and address. Thanks.
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