Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Volume 4, Issue 107

Expand Messages
  • montana_morning_star
    ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS Volume 4, Issue 107 WEDNESDAY 2 JUNE 2004 * * * SAINT OF THE DAY June 2, 2004 Sts. Marcellinus and Peter (d. 304) * * * WEAR THE BROWN
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 2, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS

      Volume 4, Issue 107

      WEDNESDAY 2 JUNE 2004

      * * *

      SAINT OF THE DAY

      June 2, 2004

      Sts. Marcellinus and Peter

      (d. 304)

      * * *

      WEAR THE BROWN SCAPULAR OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL AND
      PRAY THE ROSARY DAILY FOR THE CONVERSION OF THE WHOLE
      WORLD AND FOR CHURCH UNITY

      * * *

      INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      • SUFFERING CAN BE A PATH TO INNER FREEDOM
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . POPE GREETS ITALIANS ON THEIR NATIONAL HOLIDAY
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . HOLY SEE DELEGATE ADDRESSES OSCE ECONOMIC FORUM
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . OTHER PONTIFICAL ACTS
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Questions the Holy See Is Asking About the Eucharist
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Newspaper Calls for More Cooperation Against Terrorism
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Church's Freedom in U.S. Threatened, Says Cardinal George
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Chicago's Cardinal Laments Rome Protests That Precede Bush Visit
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Aide Warns of Christians Falling Into "a Schizophrenic Way"
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Violence Can't Drive Out Violence, Papal Envoy Tells Ugandans
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . U.S. Judge Strikes Down Partial-Birth Abortion Ban
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Cardinal Stands by Decision on Holy Communion
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Crucifixes, Bows and Celebrants' Palms
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Papal Address to Sri Lankan Ambassador
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      . Chicago Cardinal George's Remarks to the Pope
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      • CATALOGUE OF LINKS
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      • EUCHARISTIC PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE SORROWFUL HEART OF MARY
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      • DAILY REMINDER
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      • ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS ARCHIVES
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      • COPYRIGHT NOTICES
      ----------------------------------------------------------------

      * * *

      * * *

      SUFFERING CAN BE A PATH TO INNER FREEDOM

      VATICAN CITY, JUN 2, 2004 (VIS) - Psalm 40, "The prayer of a sick
      man," was the theme of the Pope's catechesis today at the weekly
      general audience, held in St. Peter's Square in the presence of
      13,000 faithful.
      John Paul II stated that Jesus quotes this Psalm on Holy Thursday in
      the Cenacle to show his deep sadness at the moment of betrayal by
      Judas: "He who breaks bread with me has raised his heel against me."
      These words, he said, express "the supplication of a man who is sick
      and abandoned by his friends."
      "A sick man starts his talk asking pardon of God, according to the
      traditional Old Testament concept that for every pain there was a
      corresponding fault. ... Even if this is a vision overcome by
      Christ, the final Revealer, suffering in itself can conceal a secret
      value and become a path to purification, to inner freedom, to
      enrichment of the soul. It invites us to overcome superficiality,
      vanity, egoism and sin, and to trust God and His saving will more
      intensely."
      The Holy Father remarked that "when evil-doers enter the scene,
      coming to a sick person not to comfort them but rather to attack
      them," the sick man who prays feels indifference and hardness, even
      on the part of his friends who are transformed into hostile and
      hateful figures."
      "The sense of bitterness is deep when the one who strikes us is 'a
      friend' whom we trusted, called literally in Hebrew 'a man of
      peace'. ... In our prayer echoes the voice of a crowd of persons who
      are forgotten and humiliated in their infirmity and weakness, also
      by those who should have supported them."
      In conclusion, the Pope said that "the prayer of Psalm 40 does not
      end, however, on this dark background. The one who prays is certain
      that God will appear on his horizon, revealing, once again, His
      love. He will give His support and take the sick person in His
      arms. ... The Psalm, marked by pain, ends on a note of light and
      hope."

      * * *

      POPE GREETS ITALIANS ON THEIR NATIONAL HOLIDAY

      VATICAN CITY, JUN 2, 2004 (VIS) - In multi-language greetings
      following the catechesis of this morning's general audience, which
      took place in St. Peter's Square, Pope John Paul had special words
      for a group of his fellow Poles, and he also addressed Italians on
      the occasion of the national day of the Republic.
      Greeting the Polish pilgrims, he thanked in particular a group from
      Shupsk "for their benevolence and for having given me the title
      of 'honorary citizen'. I want to repay this good will with my
      prayers. I also want to greet a group, including their president,
      from the Podhale Association of Chicago on the occasion of its 75th
      anniversary. I thank you for your commitment for safeguarding the
      Christian roots of the culture and Polish traditions among
      immigrants in America.
      "Today" he continued, "is the 25th anniversary of the day on which
      for the first time as Pope I kissed my native soil. I always return
      in my thoughts to those days and I thank God for the breath of the
      Holy Spirit that crossed that land and caused such a profound
      change. May God bless our fatherland and all Poles. May God bless
      you!"
      Noting that today is the national day of the Republic in Italy the
      Pope saluted "all Italians and their leaders. I hope that Italy,
      thanks to the responsible contribution of the various social
      realities and of every citizen, and remaining anchored in the great
      values that are at the basis of its culture, art and religious
      tradition, may know a future of hope, open to harmony, internal
      cohesion and solidarity."

      * * *

      HOLY SEE DELEGATE ADDRESSES OSCE ECONOMIC FORUM

      VATICAN CITY, JUN 2, 2004 (VIS) - Made public today was the speech
      given on May 31 by Msgr. Ettore Balestrero, an official of the
      Secretariat of State, at the Economic Forum of the Organization for
      Security and Cooperation in Europe during the plenary session of the
      55 States participating in the OSCE. The meeting is being held in
      Prague, the Czech Republic, May 31 to June 4.
      In his address in English, Msgr. Balestrero noted that "the OSCE
      strategy document for the economic and environmental dimension
      acknowledges that liberalization and technological change have not
      benefited all the participating States equally, thus contributing,
      in some cases, to deepening economic disparities between and also
      within our countries. Notwithstanding the progress achieved, ...
      some participating States still need assistance for transition,
      reforms and integration into the world economy in a fair and
      effective manner."
      He said that "the different conditions that must be respected in
      order to carry on a process of sustainable development make one fear
      that many countries will not be able to do so on their own. Thus a
      fundamental requirement for building up an institutional capacity
      for economic development consists in creating adequate instruments
      for the redistribution of global resources. ... It requires a
      concerted effort and economic and financial investments."
      "We know;" said Msgr. Balestrero, "that international institutions
      and mechanisms which might possibly favour such a transfer are still
      lacking. Yet we are also aware of the fact that developed countries
      at the national level adopt policies aimed at correcting market
      failures and reduced opportunities for depressed regions. In some
      countries it may well be that public decision-taking and the public
      sector itself are excessive. But the central point to be made is
      that on the global level the opposite is the case: institutional
      development has stopped at market-related structures. It is
      therefore important for OSCE's economic commitment to be aware of
      this limitation and therefore to promote adequate programmes of aid
      and redistribution."

      * * *

      OTHER PONTIFICAL ACTS

      VATICAN CITY, JUN 2, 2004 (VIS) - The Holy Father:

      - Appointed Bishop Bruno Gamberini of Braganca Paulista, Brazil as
      metropolitan archbishop of Campinas (area 2,134, population
      1,694,021, Catholics 1,235,435, priests 159, permanent deacons 4,
      religious 511), Brazil. Archbishop-elect Gamberini was born in 1950
      in Milan, ordained a priest in 1974 and a bishop in 1995. He
      succeeds Archbishop Gilberto Pereira Lopes whose resignation the
      Pope accepted upon having reached the age limit.
      - Accepted the resignation to the pastoral care of the diocese of
      Tarija, Bolivia presented by Bishop Adhemar Esquivel Kohenque upon
      having reached the age limit.

      * * *

      Questions the Holy See Is Asking About the Eucharist
      In Preparation for 2005 Synod

      VATICAN CITY, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- A questionnaire sent out by
      the Holy See to prepare for next year's Synod of Bishops will serve
      to evaluate how the baptized celebrate and live the Blessed
      Sacrament.
      The questionnaire begins with these three questions: "What
      importance does the celebration of the Eucharist have in the life of
      your communities and of the faithful? What is the participation in
      the Holy Mass on Sundays, on weekdays, in the great feasts of the
      liturgical year? Are there any approximate statistics in this
      regard?"
      The text constitutes the last chapter of the "lineamenta," or
      outline, whose answers will be used by the secretariat of the Synod
      of Bishops to write the working document that will provide the basis
      for the debates of the synodal assembly.
      The assembly, scheduled for Oct. 2-29, 2005, is entitled "The
      Eucharist: Source and Summit of the Life and Mission of the Church."
      The introduction to the outline said the document is designed to
      encourage "episcopal conferences, the Eastern Churches 'sui iuris,'
      the Dicasteries of the Roman Curia, and the Union of Superiors
      General to invite the participation of all in the Church so that
      they can enter into discussion and take a pastoral inventory."
      The laity can present their answers through their local bishops.
      "To properly prepare for the next stage in the synod process, these
      responses should arrive at the General Secretariat before 31
      December 2004," the outline indicates.
      Below is the full text of the questionnaire.

      QUESTIONS

      1. The Eucharist in the Life of the Church: What importance does the
      celebration of the Eucharist have in the life of your community and
      that of the individual believer? What is the frequency of
      participation at Mass on Sundays? On weekdays? On the major feast
      days of the liturgical year? Could you supply statistics -- even
      approximate -- in this regard?
      2. Eucharistic Doctrine and Formation: What attempts are being made
      to transmit the teaching on the Eucharist, whole and entire, to your
      community and the individual believer? Specifically, how are The
      Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1322-1419, and the Encyclical
      Letter "Ecclesia De Eucharistia" being utilized by priests, deacons,
      consecrated persons and the laity involved in pastoral work? In what
      way is the formation of faith in the Eucharist being ensured in
      initial catechesis? In homilies? In the programs of ongoing
      formation for priests, permanent deacons, and seminarians? Of
      consecrated persons? Of the laity?
      3. The Understanding of the Eucharistic Mystery: What is the
      prevailing idea on the Eucharist among priests and the faithful of
      your community: sacrifice?, memorial of the Paschal Mystery?, the
      precept of Sunday Mass?, fraternal meal?, act of adoration?
      Other ...? Practically speaking, is any one of these ideas
      prevalent? If so, what is the reason.
      4. The Shadows in the Celebration of the Eucharist: In the
      Encyclical Letter "Ecclesia De Eucharistia" (n. 10) the Holy Father
      mentions "shadows" in the celebration of the Eucharist. What are the
      negative aspects (abuses, misunderstandings) existing in Eucharistic
      worship? What elements or actions done in practice can obscure the
      profound sense of the Eucharistic mystery? What is the cause of such
      a disorienting situation for the faithful?
      5. The Eucharistic Celebration and Liturgical Norms: In an attempt
      to be personal and avant-garde, do priests manifest any attitudes in
      their celebration of Mass which are explicitly or implicitly
      contrary to the liturgical norms established by the Catholic Church
      (cf. The General Instruction on the Roman Missal, Chapter IV;
      Instruction for Applying the Liturgical Prescriptions of the Code of
      Canons of the Eastern Churches)? In your estimation, what are the
      underlying reasons for such behavior? What elements or actions
      during the celebration of Holy Mass, and also in Eucharistic worship
      outside of Mass, according to their respective norms and
      dispositions, should receive attention so as to highlight the
      profound sense of this great Mystery of the faith hidden in the gift
      of the Eucharist?
      6. The Sacrament of the Eucharist and The Sacrament of Penance:
      Conversion is necessary to participate fully in partaking of the
      Eucharist. What is the faithful's understanding of the relationship
      between the Sacrament of Penance and the Sacrament of the Eucharist?
      Holy Mass is also the celebration of salvation from sin and death.
      For the return of sinners, above all on Sundays, what is provided so
      that the faithful can celebrate the Sacrament of Penance in time to
      participate in the Eucharist? Do Christian communities often display
      a casual approach to receiving Holy Communion or do they
      unjustifiably refrain from receiving it? What is being done to
      assist the faithful to discern if they have the proper dispositions
      to approach this great Sacrament?
      7. The Sacred Character of the Eucharist: The Eucharist is the
      mystery of the Real Presence of God-among-us; at the same time, it
      is an unfathomable mystery. How should its sacred character be
      acknowledged? How do priests and the faithful manifest this sacred
      character in their celebration of Holy Mass on Sundays, weekdays,
      and major feast days and at other liturgical times during the year?
      What cultural attitudes and practices obscure this sacred character?
      8. Holy Mass and the Celebration of the Word: In parishes awaiting a
      priest, how widespread is the practice of celebrating the Liturgy of
      the Word with the distribution of the Eucharist, over which a lay
      person or Eucharistic minister often presides? What specific
      formation do those responsible receive? Are the faithful able to
      understand the difference between such celebrations and Holy Mass?
      Do they have an adequate knowledge of the distinction between an
      ordained and non-ordained minister?
      9. The Eucharist and the Other Sacraments: To what measure and with
      what criteria are the other sacraments celebrated during Holy Mass?
      When the sacraments and sacramentals are celebrated during Holy Mass
      (Matrimony, Funerals, Baptisms, etc.) with non-practicing Catholics,
      non-Catholics and unbelievers present, what steps are taken to avoid
      a casual attitude or even carelessness towards the Eucharist?
      10. The Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist: Have the faithful
      in your parishes preserved faith in the Lord's Real Presence in the
      Sacrament of the Eucharist? Do they have a clear understanding of
      the gift of the Lord's Real Presence? Do situations exist in
      Eucharistic Liturgies or the Worship of the Eucharist which might
      lead to a diminished regard for the Real Presence. If so, what might
      be the reasons?
      11. Eucharistic Devotion: Does the Worship of the Most Blessed
      Sacrament have a due place in parish life and communities? What
      importance do pastors give to adoration of the Most Blessed
      Sacrament? To Perpetual Adoration? To Benediction of the Most
      Blessed Sacrament? To personal prayer before the tabernacle? To
      processions on the Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ? To
      Eucharistic devotion in parish missions?
      12. Holy Mass and the Liturgical-Devotional Life: Do the faithful
      understand the difference between Holy Mass and other devotional
      practices like the Liturgy of the Hours, the celebration of the
      sacraments and sacramentals outside of Mass, the Liturgy of the
      Word, processions, etc.? How is the substantial difference shown
      between Eucharistic celebration and other liturgical and para-
      liturgical celebrations?
      13. Dignity at Eucharistic Celebrations: Is attention given in your
      Churches to the liturgical environment for Eucharistic celebrations?
      What is the artistic-architectural setting in which the Eucharistic
      liturgy is celebrated both on solemn occasions and on weekdays? Do
      the surroundings give a clear indication that the Eucharistic
      banquet is truly a "sacred" banquet ("Ecclesia De Eucharistia," 48)?
      How frequently and for what pastoral reasons is Mass celebrated
      outside of this place of worship?
      14. The Eucharist and Inculturation: To what measure must attention
      be given to inculturation in the celebration of the Sacrament of the
      Eucharist so as to avoid a misunderstood creativity which leads to
      peculiar and strange practices. What criteria are followed in
      inculturation? In the Latin Church, are the norms proposed in the
      Instruction "De Liturgia Romana et Inculturazione" given adequate
      consideration? What is the experience of the Eastern Churches in the
      inculturation of the Eucharist?
      15. The Eschatological Aspect of the Eucharist: Is the
      eschatological aspect of the Eucharist given sufficient emphasis in
      catechesis, in ongoing formation, in homiletics and in liturgical
      celebration? In what way is the eschatological tension flowing from
      the Eucharist present in pastoral life? How does the celebration of
      Mass manifest "the Communion of Saints," a foretaste of the
      eschatological reality?
      16. The Eucharist, Ecumenism, Interreligious Dialogue and the Sects:
      Considering the ideas on the Eucharist held by our separated
      brothers and sisters in the West and the challenges of other
      religions and the sects, how is the mystery of the Most Blessed
      Sacrament preserved and presented in its entirety, so as not to
      cause confusion or misunderstanding among the faithful, particularly
      at ecumenical and interreligious meetings?
      17. The Eucharist and Ecclesial "Intercommunion": "The celebration
      of the Eucharist cannot be the starting-point for communion"
      ("Ecclesia De Eucharistia," 35). How are the norms of intercommunion
      applied (cf. The Code of Canon Law, canon 844)? Are the faithful
      aware of the norm that a Catholic cannot receive the Eucharist in
      communities which do not have the Sacrament of Orders (cf. "Ecclesia
      De Eucharistia," 46)?
      18. The Eucharist and the Moral Life: The Eucharist provides growth
      in the moral life of the Christian. What do the faithful believe
      about the necessity of sacramental grace for living according to the
      Spirit and becoming saints? What do the faithful think about the
      relation between the reception of the Sacrament of the Eucharist and
      other aspects of the Christian life: personal sanctification, moral
      obligations, fraternal charity, the construction of an earthly
      society, etc.?
      19. The Eucharist and Mission: The Eucharist is also a gift for
      mission. Are the faithful aware that the Sacrament of the Eucharist
      leads to the mission they have to fulfill in the world, according to
      their state in life?
      20. More on the Eucharist: What other aspects of the Sacrament of
      the Eucharist, not contained in the preceding questions, should be
      considered in preparing the Instrumentum laboris which will be
      discussed during the synodal assembly?
      [The text of the "lineamenta" may be consulted in the Roman Curia
      section of the Vatican's Web page, in the area marked "Synod of
      Bishops"]

      * * *

      Newspaper Calls for More Cooperation Against Terrorism

      VATICAN CITY, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- The weekend attacks in
      Saudi Arabia, linked to al-Qaida, prompted the semiofficial Vatican
      newspaper to call for greater international cooperation against
      terrorism and its causes.
      In the attacks, in two oil installations that house offices and
      employees' residences in Jobar, "22 innocent civilians were
      barbarously killed," L'Osservatore Romano noted.
      In its May 31-June 1 Italian edition, the newspaper states
      that "whoever kills with terrorist acts nourishes sentiments of
      contempt toward humanity, manifesting despair about life and the
      future. From this point of view, everything can be hated and
      destroyed."
      "In the struggle against terrorist activity," the paper
      stated, "greater international cooperation is necessary which must
      also entail a particular commitment, at a political, diplomatic and
      economic level, to resolve with courage and determination the
      eventual situations of oppression and marginalization that might be
      at the origin of these terrorist designs."

      * * *

      Church's Freedom in U.S. Threatened, Says Cardinal George
      "Arena of Ideological Warfare," He Tells Pope

      VATICAN CITY, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- Chicago's archbishop warned
      that the freedom of the Church in the United States "is now
      threatened by movements within" and "by government and groups
      outside."
      Cardinal Francis George delivered that sober assessment to John Paul
      II during the recent visit to Rome by bishops from the
      ecclesiastical provinces of Chicago, Indianapolis and Milwaukee.
      "The Church's mission is threatened externally by an erosion of
      institutional freedom," the cardinal told the Pope in his address
      during the U.S. bishops' five-yearly visit to the Vatican.
      "The scandal of the sexual abuse of minors by some priests and the
      failure of adequate oversight by some bishops has brought with it a
      more overt expression of the anti-Catholicism which has always
      marked American culture," Cardinal George said Friday.
      "In this context, courts and legislatures are more ready to restrict
      the freedom of the Church to act publicly and to interfere in the
      internal governance of the church in ways that are new to American
      life. Our freedom to govern ourselves is diminished," he lamented.
      "The Church's mission is further weakened by her inability to shape
      a public conversation that would enable people to understand the
      Gospel and the demands of discipleship," the Chicago archbishop
      said. "The public conversation in the United States speaks easily of
      individual rights; it cannot give voice to considerations of the
      common good.
      "Matters that should fall outside the purview of law in a
      constitutional democracy with a limited government -- the nature of
      life, of marriage, even of faith itself -- are now determined by
      courts designed only to protect individual rights."
      "In this culture," the cardinal said, "the Gospel's call to receive
      freedom as a gift from God and to live its demands faithfully is
      regarded as oppressive, and the Church, which voices those demands
      publicly, is seen as an enemy of personal freedom and a cause of
      social violence.
      "The public conversation in the United States is often an exercise
      in manipulation and always inadequate to the realities of both the
      country and the world, let alone the mysteries of faith. It
      fundamentally distorts Catholicism and any other institution
      regarded as 'foreign' to the secular individualist ethos. Our
      freedom to preach the Gospel is diminished."
      Cardinal George continued: "The Church's mission is threatened
      internally by divisions which paralyze her ability to act forcefully
      and decisively."
      "On the left," he said, "the Church's teachings on sexual morality
      and the nature of ordained priesthood and of the Church herself are
      publicly opposed, as are the bishops who preach and defend these
      teachings. On the right, the Church's teachings might be accepted,
      but bishops who do not govern exactly and to the last detail in the
      way expected are publicly opposed."
      "The Church is an arena of ideological warfare rather than a way of
      discipleship shepherded by bishops," the cardinal observed."
      "Unsure of other protection, the Church turns in faith to her Lord,"
      he told the Pope. "Your teaching, Holy Father, on the Eucharist and
      the initial preparation for the next Synod of Bishops on this
      mystery of faith both illustrate the inability of our culture to
      understand what is central to the Catholic faith and also show us
      how to address our current struggles.
      "The relation between the body of Christ which is the holy Eucharist
      and the body of Christ which is his Church passes through the
      sacrament of holy orders. A culture founded on the rejection of the
      sacrament of holy orders can grasp neither the Eucharist nor
      apostolic governance."
      Near the end of his address, Cardinal George said: "Americans know
      that we as a people can be generous, fair-minded and freedom-loving;
      we are slower to see that we can be arrogant, brutal and eroticized.
      Is the mission of the Catholic Church to America one of fulfillment
      or healing? One of completion or forgiveness?"
      He added: "The Eucharist is both, of course, and so must be the
      mission; but we are still struggling to find an approach to
      evangelizing which will open our culture and our country to the Holy
      Spirit and to the path of Christian discipleship."

      * * *

      Chicago's Cardinal Laments Rome Protests That Precede Bush Visit
      Americans Puzzled by Opposition, He Says

      ROME, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- Though he believes U.S.-Italian
      relations "are excellent," the archbishop of Chicago expressed
      regret over the demonstrations against George Bush being planned in
      Rome before the president's visit this week.
      The demonstrations reflect an attitude that puzzles Americans, said
      Cardinal Francis George in an interview with the Italian newspaper
      Avvenire. "We are unable to understand how others see us," he said.
      The cardinal, who has just been in Rome on his five-yearly visit to
      the Pope, was able to witness the planning of these protests, which
      he considers more in terms of Italian internal politics rather than
      U.S.-Italian relations. The latter, "from what I know, are
      excellent," he said.
      However, "when we discover that we are not liked in some part of the
      world, we are shocked without realizing before that we had done
      something disagreeable or annoyed others' sensitivity," the cardinal
      explained.
      With their media focused on domestic news and a U.S.-centered
      political debate, American citizens have the "bad habit" of pursuing
      objectives, "including with the best of intentions, without being
      too concerned about the consequences," the Chicago archbishop said.
      In this regard, and in keeping with its mission, the universal
      Church can put people "in communion among themselves overcoming
      geographical, social and cultural limitations," an endeavor in
      which "we can and must do more, given that were are too absorbed in
      local problems," Cardinal George added.
      Bush's visit to Rome will take place in the context of the 60th
      anniversary of its liberation by the Allies during World War II.
      The U.S. president, a Methodist, requested an audience with John
      Paul II before the latter travels to Switzerland this weekend. High
      on the agenda of the papal audience, scheduled for Friday, is the
      pacification of Iraq.
      "I am convinced that the Pope now desires that the campaign in Iraq
      end successfully, for the good of all those involved," Cardinal
      George said. "But I also think he is perplexed by the way Americans
      are pursuing their mission in that country."
      "The abuses against Iraqi prisoners are a source of shame for all
      Americans, whether or not believers," the cardinal said.
      However, "those actions are certainly not representative of our
      behavior or of the values that are our foundation as a nation," he
      added. "Therefore, it is important that they be brought into the
      light and justly punished."

      * * *

      Aide Warns of Christians Falling Into "a Schizophrenic Way"
      Aggressive Secularism Targeting the Faith, Says Pontifical Council
      Official

      VALENCIA, Spain, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- In an age when religion
      is increasingly marginalized, many Christians with duties in public
      life "end up by living in a schizophrenic way," warns a Vatican
      aide.
      Guzmán Carriquiry, undersecretary of the Pontifical Council for the
      Laity, also noted that nowadays there is "an aggressive resurgence
      of secularism, which is different from true laicism."
      "We Christians affirm true laicism as the authentic distinction
      between church and state," said Carriquiry. "But secularism tries to
      marginalize the Church from social, economic and cultural life, as
      if it had nothing to say; secularism seeks the removal and
      progressive marginalization of Christianity."
      The Uruguayan intellectual made these statements to the Veritas
      agency at the closing Monday of a seminar for professors held at the
      Catholic University of Valencia.
      Going deeper into the roots of secularism, Carriquiry explains that
      it is "an outdated, very old, idea whose arguments are incapable of
      giving a foundation, a soul, a mystical dimension to the building of
      Europe. This is why Europe seems tired and old."
      "How are we going to achieve the unity of Europe without foundations
      that ensure strong cohesion?" he asked. "How can we build a
      political entity without a mystical component that motivates it?"
      "All attempts to censure and remove the Christian roots and
      tradition that have made Europe are not only a sin of ignorance
      against culture, but constitute a lack of observation of a
      historical fact," Carriquiry added.
      Carriquiry, one of the laymen with the highest responsibilities in
      the Holy See, said that Catholics are also "disciples and witnesses
      of Christ" in public life.
      "The encounter with the Lord changes life, changes all the
      dimensions of life, despite our resistances and sins," he said.
      "The encounter with Christ changes our relations with our spouse,
      with our children, the way of approaching our professional work, our
      leisure, the use of money, friendships. This encounter changes our
      lives, makes them more human," the undersecretary said.
      "To reduce this experience to the private sphere is to put
      impossible limits on the grace of God, which changes life and the
      way of looking at reality, which commits us to live in all
      directions, which gives us a particular view of society, politics,
      culture and profession," he observed.
      "Nothing of what is human can be foreign to that encounter with the
      Lord; consequently, those who wish to reduce it to churches and
      sacristies or to convert it into a social residue, are mistaken,"
      Carriquiry contended.
      In the present environment, he said, "many Christians with
      responsibilities in political and university life end up by living
      in a schizophrenic way."
      "On one hand they maintain their faith with pious practices,
      including important ones, such as sacramental practices, but
      disconnected from their public commitments. One does not perceive
      the real influence of the faith in their lives and they live in an
      anonymous way, assimilated to the 'worldly' culture of the
      environments in which they circulate," he said.
      Carriquiry added: "We need to form a new generation that lives
      holiness in all the dimensions of life, that lives, not with a vague
      Christian inspiration devoid of contents, but with a faith lived as
      a novelty of life and of proposals."

      * * *

      Violence Can't Drive Out Violence, Papal Envoy Tells Ugandans
      Cardinal Martino Visits Gulu and a Refugee Camp

      KAMPALA, Uganda, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- The president of the
      Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace met with citizens of this
      country's war-torn north to express John Paul II's solidarity.
      "The flames of a bush cannot be extinguished with fire," Cardinal
      Renato Martino told a crowd gathered today in the cathedral of Gulu.
      The papal envoy was using an African proverb to emphasize that
      violence is not overcome with arms but with the Gospel.
      The cardinal described Archbishop John Baptist Odama of Gulu, who is
      president the Acholi Religious Leaders Peace Initiative, as
      a "hero." The ARLPI is working to end the more than 15 years of war
      in the region.
      The pontifical council president also visited the refugee camp of
      Pagak, where a few weeks ago more than 30 people were killed, to
      manifest the Holy See's solidarity.
      Father Giulio Albanese, director of the Missionary News Service
      Agency, who is traveling with the papal envoy, said: "From the
      humanitarian point of view, the situation is truly desperate.
      Virtually 80% of the population is displaced. The missions have
      become real fortresses of society."
      On Wednesday, Cardinal Martino plans to visit Kitgum, whose Catholic
      mission was attacked Monday by the rebel Lord's Resistance Army.
      Father Albanese said that "the majority of these rebels are
      practically children who have been kidnapped in villages and forced
      to fight."
      Since 1994, about 25,000 children have been kidnapped in the north
      by rebels, the priest said.

      * * *

      U.S. Judge Strikes Down Partial-Birth Abortion Ban

      SAN FRANCISCO, California, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- A federal
      judge said the ban on partial-birth abortion, signed into law last
      year, is unconstitutional.
      U.S. District Court Judge Phyllis Hamilton said today the law was
      unconstitutional because it was vague and posed an "undue burden" on
      abortion "rights."
      She also ruled against the law because it lacked an exemption to
      protect a mother's health.
      U.S. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a key backer of the ban,
      said he was disappointed by the ruling but predicted it would
      eventually be overturned, Reuters reported.

      * * *

      Cardinal Stands by Decision on Holy Communion

      CHICAGO, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- Cardinal Francis George stood by
      his decision to deny Communion to homosexual activists who wore
      telltale rainbow-colored sashes to Sunday Mass at Holy Name
      Cathedral.
      "It's national policy and the bishops are supposed to act together,"
      the archbishop said Monday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.
      About a dozen members of the Rainbow Sash Movement, a homosexual
      group, were refused Communion and given blessings instead.
      Cardinal George, who was returning from a Rome trip, was not at the
      Mass. But he had told priests in a letter last week not to give
      Communion to group members wearing sashes.

      * * *

      Crucifixes, Bows and Celebrants' Palms
      And More on "Redemptionis Sacramentum"

      ROME, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- Answered by Father Edward McNamara,
      professor of liturgy at the Regina Apostolorum Pontifical
      University.

      Q: 1) Is the crucifix essential to the celebration of the Mass? 2)
      When the priest comes to the altar, does he bow toward the altar? At
      the end of Mass, the priest venerates the altar; does he bows toward
      the crucifix or the tabernacle? 3) During the consecration prayer
      ("Take this ....") the concelebrants extend their hands, but they do
      not do this uniformly. Some extend the hand with palm downward,
      while others extend it with palm open toward the ceiling. Which is
      correct? -- G.C., Bangalore, India
      A: As there are several questions I will try to answer them in
      order.
      1. The use of the crucifix is obligatory during the celebration of
      Mass. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal in No. 308
      requires the use of a "cross, with the figure of Christ crucified
      upon it, either on the altar or near it, where it is clearly visible
      to the assembled congregation. It is appropriate that such a cross,
      which calls to mind for the faithful the saving Passion of the Lord,
      remain near the altar even outside of liturgical celebrations."
      This specific call for the use of the crucifix was probably inserted
      into the new GIRM to counter a movement which favored the use of
      simple bare crosses or even images of the risen Christ.
      While such symbols may have a role in churches, they may not
      substitute the crucifix. Use of the crucifix during Mass serves as a
      reminder and a sign that the Eucharistic celebration is the same
      sacrifice as Calvary.
      Yet, there are many different acceptable forms of liturgical
      crucifix which may be used at Mass.
      2. If the tabernacle is present in the sanctuary, then the priest
      and ministers genuflect toward it at the beginning (before kissing
      the altar) and at the end of Mass (after kissing the altar), but not
      during the celebration itself -- even though they may cross in front
      of it.
      It may be an approved custom in your country, India, to substitute a
      deep bow for a genuflection if this gesture has the same
      significance of adoration implied in the genuflection.
      If the tabernacle is not present in the sanctuary, then the priest
      and ministers bow toward the altar (not the crucifix) at the
      beginning and end of Mass.
      3. Your third question reflects a long-standing debate regarding
      this gesture which has occasioned rivers of ink to be spilt among
      liturgists -- without really clearing anything up.
      I would first observe that, unlike the pronunciation of the words of
      consecration, the gesture of extending the hand at this moment may
      even be omitted and is not required for the validity of the
      concelebrants' celebration.
      The crux of the debate is to determine whether the gesture of
      extending the hand is merely indicative -- a pointing toward the
      sacred species -- or whether it is directly a sign of the
      concelebrants' power of consecration.
      Those who favored the indicative meaning favor the palm pointing
      upward, usually at a slight angle.
      Others, such as the late Benedictine Cipriano Vagaggini (who
      actually had a hand in composing the new rite of concelebration),
      favored the epicletic (invocative) gesture of palms downward in the
      same manner that all priests do at the beginning of the rite of
      consecration when they extend both hands and call upon the Holy
      Spirit to transform the bread and wine into Christ's body and blood.
      After a few years it became apparent that the debate was going
      nowhere and, absent an official declaration from the Holy See,
      everybody more or less agreed to disagree.
      This does not mean that when some priests act one way and others
      another they are expressing some profound theological disagreement.
      It probably does no more then reflect the opinion of whoever taught
      liturgy in the seminary.

      * * *

      "Redemptionis Sacramentum," Continued

      Several readers asked about my comments on the new
      instruction "Redemptionis Sacramentum," especially about the rights
      of the priest to celebrate Mass in Latin.
      The instruction states in No. 112: "Mass is celebrated either in
      Latin or in another language, provided that liturgical texts are
      used which have been approved according to the norm of law. Except
      in the case of celebrations of the Mass that are scheduled by the
      ecclesiastical authorities to take place in the language of the
      people, Priests are always and everywhere permitted to celebrate
      Mass in Latin."
      This right refers, of course, to celebrating according to the
      present Roman Missal, not to the 1962 Roman Missal, the last edition
      of the so-called Tridentine rite which requires specific
      authorization from the bishop.
      The priest's right is not absolute as it does not include the right
      to celebrate in Latin at Masses which "Ecclesiastic authorities"
      schedule for Mass in the vernacular.
      Thus, the local bishop could determine that regular parish Masses
      may not be celebrated in Latin and a parish priest might not allow a
      visiting priest to celebrate a previously scheduled vernacular Mass
      in Latin.
      But the bishop may not forbid priests from saying Mass in Latin
      either alone or for specific groups outside the regular schedules,
      even if he personally holds that it is not pastorally advisable.
      It seems rather strange that in one or two cases bishops have even
      gone so far as to threaten to suspend priests for celebrating Mass
      in Latin. Except in the case of a priest defying an order regarding
      scheduled Masses, such an action would be a grave abuse of authority
      and contrary to canon law.
      It is also very debatable whether an occasional or even regular Mass
      in Latin is pastorally ineffective.
      It is a point that cannot be resolved based on a priori judgments,
      even on the diocesan level, and may be true in some parish contexts
      and false in others. It can only be judged by the pastoral reality
      of full or empty pews.
      In the end, bishops and priests must do what is best for the good of
      souls even if it means going against their personal preferences for
      or against the use of Latin.
      Some readers have questioned the real efficacy of the instruction,
      which in the end will depend on the willingness of priests and above
      all of the local ordinary to enforce its provisions.
      Certainly, it is incumbent upon the bishops to supervise the liturgy
      in their diocese and they should be vigilant including imposing
      canonical penalties for grave abuses.
      This duty does not spring from some administrative decision to
      decentralize at the "Vatican." Rather, it stems from the Church's
      divinely willed structure in which the bishop is High Priest and
      shepherd of his flock whom he is called to lead to sanctity and
      communion with the universal Church.
      Bishops, like all human beings, have their strong and weak points.
      But the human failings of a few prelates do not invalidate the
      principle of hierarchical and sacramental order in governing the
      Church, which has weathered the test of time.
      As Cardinal Ercole Consalvi is reported to have asked Napoleon
      Bonaparte, when the French emperor threatened to crush the
      Church, "If in 1,800 years we clergy have failed to destroy the
      Church, do you really think that you'll be able to do it?"
      All the same, the instruction permits, albeit as a last recourse,
      for any member of the faithful to lodge a complaint of abuses
      directly to the Holy See (No. 184). That should serve as a prod for
      unwilling bishops who fail to act to stem grave abuses.

      Readers may send questions to news@.... Please put the
      word "Liturgy" in the subject field. The text should include your
      initials, your city and your state, province or country.

      * * *

      Papal Address to Sri Lankan Ambassador
      "Religious Freedom Is the Foundation of All Other Human Rights"

      VATICAN CITY, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of the
      address John Paul II gave last Thursday when he met the new Sri
      Lankan ambassador to the Holy See, Sarala Manourie Fernando.

      Your Excellency,

      I am pleased to welcome you today as you present the Letters
      accrediting you as ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary of
      the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka to the Holy See. I
      thank you for bringing me the courteous greetings of President
      Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga and I ask you kindly to convey to
      her my good wishes, together with the assurance of my prayers that
      Almighty God will bless all the people of Sri Lanka with a future of
      peace and prosperity.

      Your Excellency has pointed to the importance of the resumption of
      peace talks and the promotion of dialogue and negotiation in order
      to achieve a political resolution of the continuing civil unrest in
      Sri Lanka. The present cease-fire in fact represents a precious
      opportunity for both sides in the conflict to concentrate on
      building trust and a lasting peace grounded in respect for
      differences and a commitment to reconciliation, justice and
      solidarity.

      It is my hope that progress made in the peace process will also
      serve as an incentive to the international community to offer
      support and aid as Sri Lanka faces the challenging task of
      rebuilding and pursuing a sound development which will benefit all
      its people. In this context, I very much appreciate your reference
      to Sri Lanka's long tradition of religious tolerance and diversity
      as a precious gift which must be protected and promoted. In
      cooperation with all men and women of good will, the followers of
      the various religions have a particular role to play in fostering
      reconciliation, justice and peace in every sphere of society.

      Precisely because of their shared convictions about the sacredness
      of creation, the dignity of each individual and the unity of the
      whole human family, they are challenged to work together in laying
      the spiritual foundations for genuine social harmony. I renew the
      hope I expressed during my pastoral visit to Sri Lanka that all will
      continue "to pursue this path, which is surely the one most in
      accord with its history and the genius of your people" (Farewell
      Address, Colombo, January 21, 1995). A multi-ethnic and religiously
      diverse society like Sri Lanka will surely find in its rich cultural
      and spiritual traditions the inspiration needed to building unity
      within diversity, in a spirit of solidarity which acknowledges and
      values the contribution of each of its members.

      Although the Catholic community in Sri Lanka is a minority, it is
      fully committed to this goal, and strives through its schools and
      charitable institutions to be an instrument of peace by teaching
      tolerance and respect, above all to the young people who are the
      future of the nation. The Church wishes to make every possible
      contribution to the ongoing process of pacification.

      As citizens of Sri Lanka, Catholics rightly expect that their
      religious and civil freedoms will be fully guaranteed, including
      their right to propose to others the saving truth which they have
      come to know and have embraced. Religious freedom, as an expression
      of the inviolable dignity of the human person in the search for
      truth, is in a real way the foundation of all other human rights.
      This freedom, which, as you have noted, also includes the right to
      adopt a religion or belief of one's choice, has long been recognized
      as a fundamental human right by the international community and has
      been enshrined in your country's constitution.

      It is precisely in the name of religious freedom that the Catholic
      Church, in carrying out her mission, firmly deplores all violence
      perpetrated against others in the name of religion. She likewise
      rejects any form of proselytization, understood as the attempt to
      violate another person's freedom of conscience through moral or
      financial coercion. Such acts represent an offense against the
      authentic nature of religion, which is meant to be "an inexhaustible
      wellspring of respect and harmony between peoples; religion is, in
      fact, the chief antidote to violence and conflict" (Message for the
      2002 World Day of Peace, 14). I take this opportunity to reiterate
      my conviction that respectful dialogue and ongoing cooperation
      between religious leaders and the civil authorities remain the best
      way to a lasting solution to the troubling issues raised by acts of
      fanaticism and aggression associated with certain individuals or
      groups, while at the same time guaranteeing the demands of justice
      and the exercise of religious freedom.

      Your Excellency, I offer you my prayerful good wishes as you take up
      your high responsibilities. I am confident that the fulfillment of
      your diplomatic duties will contribute to a further strengthening of
      the friendly relations between Sri Lanka and the Holy See. Upon you
      and upon all whom you serve I cordially invoke Almighty God's
      blessings of wisdom, joy and peace.

      [Original text: English]

      * * *

      Chicago Cardinal George's Remarks to the Pope
      "Church's Ability to Evangelize Is Diminished"

      VATICAN CITY, JUNE 1, 2004 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of the
      remarks U.S. Cardinal Francis George delivered to John Paul II last
      Friday during the five-yearly visit of bishops from the
      ecclesiastical provinces of Chicago, Indianapolis and Milwaukee.

      Holy Father,

      We are the bishops of the provinces of Indianapolis, Milwaukee and
      Chicago. With our priests, religious men and women and faithful lay
      people, we offer you our prayers, our gratitude and our love. In our
      part of the United States, Catholics comprise 10 to 15 percent of
      the total population in some dioceses and more than 40 percent in
      others. Catholics have lived in this area for over 300 years, long
      before it was part of the United States, but the ancestors of most
      Catholics today came as immigrants from Europe throughout the 19th
      and early 20th centuries. Now they are joined by many recent
      immigrants, especially from Eastern Europe, Latin America and parts
      of Asia.

      On the occasion of this "ad limina" visit to you and the officers of
      the Roman Curia, we believe it important to affirm our profound
      commitment to the mission Christ gave the Church and to do so at a
      time when the Church in the United States is in great danger.

      The Church's mission is threatened externally by an erosion of
      institutional freedom. The scandal of the sexual abuse of minors by
      some priests and the failure of adequate oversight by some bishops
      has brought with it a more overt expression of the anti-Catholicism
      which has always marked American culture. In this context, courts
      and legislatures are more ready to restrict the freedom of the
      Church to act publicly and to interfere in the internal governance
      of the church in ways that are new to American life. Our freedom to
      govern ourselves is diminished.

      The Church's mission is further weakened by her inability to shape a
      public conversation that would enable people to understand the
      Gospel and the demands of discipleship. The public conversation in
      the United States speaks easily of individual rights; it cannot give
      voice to considerations of the common good. Matters that should fall
      outside the purview of law in a constitutional democracy with a
      limited government -- the nature of life, of marriage, even of faith
      itself -- are now determined by courts designed only to protect
      individual rights.

      The increasingly oppressive legal system and the bureaucratic
      apparatus of states are abetted by a media industry which selects
      for publication only facts which fit stories it wants to tell. The
      public conversation, like the political, legal and economic systems,
      is based on the generation of conflict between individuals and
      groups. Culturally, the right to sexual freedom is now the basis of
      personal freedom.

      In this culture, the Gospel's call to receive freedom as a gift from
      God and to live its demands faithfully is regarded as oppressive,
      and the Church, which voices those demands publicly, is seen as an
      enemy of personal freedom and a cause of social violence. The public
      conversation in the United States is often an exercise in
      manipulation and always inadequate to the realities of both the
      country and the world, let alone the mysteries of faith. It
      fundamentally distorts Catholicism and any other institution
      regarded as "foreign" to the secular individualist ethos. Our
      freedom to preach the Gospel is diminished.

      The Church's mission is threatened internally by divisions which
      paralyze her ability to act forcefully and decisively. On the left,
      the Church's teachings on sexual morality and the nature of ordained
      priesthood and of the Church herself are publicly opposed, as are
      the bishops who preach and defend these teachings. On the right, the
      Church's teachings might be accepted, but bishops who do not govern
      exactly and to the last detail in the way expected are publicly
      opposed. The Church is an arena of ideological warfare rather than a
      way of discipleship shepherded by bishops. The freedom of the Church
      is now threatened by movements within the Church and by government
      and groups outside the Church. The Church's ability to evangelize is
      diminished.

      Unsure of other protection, the Church turns in faith to her Lord.
      Your teaching, Holy Father, on the Eucharist and the initial
      preparation for the next Synod of Bishops on this mystery of faith
      both illustrate the inability of our culture to understand what is
      central to the Catholic faith and also show us how to address our
      current struggles. The relation between the body of Christ which is
      the holy Eucharist and the body of Christ which is his Church passes
      through the sacrament of holy orders. A culture founded on the
      rejection of the sacrament of holy orders can grasp neither the
      Eucharist nor apostolic governance.

      Even Catholics, shaped by this culture more than by faith, often
      fail to understand these gifts of the Lord to his people. Catechesis
      and preaching on the Eucharist are being better integrated into our
      ministry; even more important, participation in the celebration of
      the Eucharist each Sunday and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament on
      a regular basis as part of the way of discipleship are being
      emphasized. These and many other signs of the Holy Spirit's action
      in the Church in the United States give us hope.

      Over a century and a half ago, Father Isaac Hecker, a convert to the
      Church and the founder of the Society of St. Paul, held that America
      would have to become Catholic in order to fulfill all that was good
      in the American soul. His fellow convert, Dr. Orestes Brownson, held
      that America would become Catholic when the country came to realize
      its own inadequacies and sinfulness.

      Americans know that we as a people can be generous, fair-minded and
      freedom-loving; we are slower to see that we can be arrogant, brutal
      and eroticized. Is the mission of the Catholic Church to America one
      of fulfillment or healing? One of completion or forgiveness? The
      Eucharist is both, of course, and so must be the mission; but we are
      still struggling to find an approach to evangelizing which will open
      our culture and our country to the Holy Spirit and to the path of
      Christian discipleship.

      In dedicating ourselves anew to this mission, Holy Father, we thank
      God for your ministry as vicar of Christ, as Successor of Peter, and
      we ask for your prayers and your blessing.

      * * *

      CATALOGUE OF LINKS

      1. HOW TO USE LINKS -- RealPlayer

      Roman Catholic News is very happy to announce new exciting links
      available to you, our fine subscribers. Some links require
      Realplayer
      a software program that allows you to see live television and hear
      audio recordings as copy go to EWTN Live TV and Radio on the link
      below and scroll down until you find the Download Free RealPlayer
      link and click it on.

      2. Live EWTN TV and Radio
      <http://www.ewtn.com/audiovideo/index.htm>

      CONTAINS:

      • Live EWTN TV - English • EWTN AM/FM RADIO
      • Live EWTN TV - Spanish • Catholic World Today Radio
      • Today's Homily (Video) • Audio of Today's Homily
      • Pope's Wednesday Audience Audio • Radio Catolica Mundial
      • EWTN's The World Over • Mother Angelica Live Video
      • Audio Library • Life On The Rock (Video)
      • The Journey Home (Video) • EWTN Religious Catalogue

      Send EWTN donations online:
      <https://www.ewtn.com/ewtn/ssl/donation/donation_ewtn.asp>

      * * *

      3. Today's Lectionary Readings Text
      <http://www.nccbuscc.org/nab/060204.htm> (English)

      <http://www.alingilalyawmi.org> (Arabic)

      Biblica Online
      <http://biblica.bsw.org>

      * * *

      4.DIVINE OFFICE TEXTS & AUDIO ONLINE:

      OFFICE OF READINGS, TEXTS
      <http://www.universalis.com/cgi-bin/display/600/USA/Readings.html>

      MORNING, EVENING & NIGHT PRAYERS, TEXTS:
      <http://www.liturgyhours.org>

      AUDIO RECORDINGS OF THE DIVINE OFFICE: recited by the
      Monks of Adoration:
      <http://www.monksofadoration.org/audiolit.html>

      * * *

      5. Polish Rosary Hour by the Conventual Franciscans
      <http://www.rosaryhour.net/ra/program.ram>

      * * *

      6. CHANTED ROSARY ONLINE
      <http://www.monksofadoration.org/rosarych.html>

      DOWNLOAD FREE SCRIPTURAL ROSARY
      <http://www.virtualrosary.org/>

      Our Father Movie
      <http://www.dayspring.com/movies/webmovies/lordsprayer.html>

      * * *

      7. CHAPLET OF DIVINE MERCY ONLINE
      <http://www.markhargrave.com/chaplet.html>

      * * *

      8. THE BEATIFICATION OF MAMA GILI

      Color Photograph of Mama Gili, Biography and Prayers
      <http://holyfaceofjesus.com/dolores_immacolata.htm>

      Cause of Mama Gili as Servant of God (Part 1)
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/33>

      Cause of Mama Gili as Servant of God (Part 2)
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/37>

      Need a Miracle?
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/55>

      Dolores Immacolata "Mama" Gili (1892-1985)
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/117>

      MAMA GILI GUILD

      The Mama Gili Guild was established several years ago to gather,
      collect, and publish information on Dolores Immacolata Gili (1892-
      1985) for an investigation into her cause as a Servant of God, as
      well as to promote her cause and to perpetuate her cult by directing
      prayer groups assembled in her honor. It has continuously enjoyed
      the
      ecclesiastical approval of Theodore Cardinal McCarrick, and the Most
      Reverend John Joseph Myers, Archbishop of Newark, New Jersey.

      Call or write today regarding favors granted through the
      intercession
      of Dolores Immacolata "Mama" Gili, or, for more information about
      the
      cause of her investigation for canonization to:

      Rev. Dante DiGirolamo, Director
      Mama Gili Guild
      P. O. Box 455
      Kearny, New Jersey 07032
      Phone (973) 412-1170
      Fax (973) 412-7011

      * * *

      9. ABBAYE SAINT-JOSEPH DE CLAIRVAL

      The Benedictine monks of Abbaye Saint-Joseph de Clairval mail a free
      monthly newsletter to anyone who requests it. Also free of charge
      are: the tract about the divinity of Jesus Christ; tract about the
      Truths of the Catholic Religion; scapular of Our Lady of Mount
      Carmel, with explanatory notice; the promises of the Sacred Heart;
      the mysteries of the Rosary.

      Sample Newsletter

      <http://www.clairval.com/lettre.cgi?language=EN>

      Abbey of Saint-Joseph de Clairval

      21150 FLAVIGNY-SUR-OZERAIN
      France

      Phone.: 03 80 96 22 31
      Fax: 03 80 96 25 29
      Email: <englishspoken@c...> or
      <stjoseph.flavigny@l...>

      <http://www.clairval.com>

      10. Thomas a Kempis, Imitation of Christ. English Trans. Online
      <http://www.ccel.org/k/kempis/imitation2/htm/i.htm>

      Thomas a Kempis, De Imitatione Christi. Latin Text Online
      <http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/kempis.html>

      * * *

      EUCHARISTIC PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE SORROWFUL HEART OF MARY


      When the Eucharistic host is elevated at Mass say:

      "Eternal Father, through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary,
      I offer you the crucified Body of Your dearly beloved Son, Jesus
      Christ, in reparation for all the sins committed against you and for
      the conversion and salvation of the whole world."

      When the Eucharistic chalice is elevated at Mass say:

      "Eternal Father, through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary,
      I offer you the precious Blood of Your dearly beloved Son, Jesus
      Christ, in reparation for all the sins committed against you and for
      the conversion and salvation of the whole world."

      * * *

      DAILY REMINDER

      "during this important time, as the eve of the new millennium
      approaches unity among all Christians of the various confessions
      will
      increase until they reach full communion." John Paul II, Tertio
      Millennio Adveniente, 16

      "Keep close to the Mother of God as if you were the child Jesus
      clinging to her robes while walking down a dusty and busy crowded
      street and you'll always be safe."

      * * *

      ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS ARCHIVES
      To gain access to all of the Roman Catholic News archives go to the
      URL:<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News>

      This will give you the archive of all of the articles in all issues.
      There are four ways to access archived articles: (1) Go to the Home
      Page panel on the far left and click on the word "Messages" just
      below the word "Home"; (2) then click on the articles posted by
      date;
      (3) or click on the blue Arabic numerals in the box for the month in
      the yearly calendar window at the bottom of the page;(4)or type in a
      keyword in the long rectangular white box alongside the long
      rectangular button that reads SEARCH ARCHIVE, and then click that
      button.

      __________________________________________________
      © Copyright 2004 John N. Lupia for Roman Catholic News at the URL:
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News>, unless
      specified
      otherwise. All rights reserved. Neither this work nor any part of it
      may be reproduced,distributed, performed or displayed in any medium,
      including electronic or digital, without permission in writing from
      the copyright owners. All articles from VIS, VID, Zenit , Associated
      Press (AP), Reuters, and Noticias Eclesiales are republished by
      approval and courtesy of these news agencies. We encourage our
      readers to send financial support to Zenit, a private news
      organization in Rome. Zenit (www.zenit.org), VIS (V.I.S. - Vatican
      Information Service) Zenit, Associated Press (AP), Reuters, (VID)
      Vidimus Dominum, and Noticias Eclesiales own the original copyright
      for their news releases as credited. All copyright materials copied
      in any form must include the appropriate copyright owner; for Roman
      Catholic News use our URL as follows:

      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News>.

      All correspondence should be sent to:
      <Roman-Catholic-News-owner@yahoogroups.com>
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.