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Volume 2, No. 212

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  • John N. Lupia
    ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS Volume 2, Issue 212 THURSDAY 3 October 2002 * * * WEAR THE BROWN SCAPULAR OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL AND PRAY THE ROSARY DAILY FOR THE
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 2, 2002
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      ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS

      Volume 2, Issue 212
      THURSDAY 3 October 2002

      * * *

      WEAR THE BROWN SCAPULAR OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT
      CARMEL AND PRAY THE ROSARY DAILY FOR THE
      CONVERSION OF THE WHOLE WORLD AND FOR CHURCH
      UNITY

      * * *

      INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Papal Comment on Canticle in Isaiah 26
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Let Guardian Angels Guide You, Pope Urges
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Nuclear Arms Are Incompatible with Peace, Vatican Tells U.N.
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Vatican Aide's U.N. Address on Disarmament
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Bracing for the Worst in Belarus
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • CATALOGUE OF LINKS
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • HOW TO POST A QUESTION TO THE CATHOLIC REFERENCE
      DESK AND HOW TO SUBMIT AN ARTICLE FOR PUBLICATION
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • EUCHARISTIC PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE SORROWFUL
      HEART OF MARY
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • DAILY REMINDER
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS ARCHIVES
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • COPYRIGHT NOTICES
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------

      * * *

      Papal Comment on Canticle in Isaiah 26

      Faith in God Is the Rock in Life, Says John Paul II

      VATICAN CITY, OCT. 2, 2002 (Zenit.org).- Here is a translation of
      John Paul II's address at today's general audience, which he
      dedicated to a commentary on the canticle of Chapter 26 of the
      Book of Isaiah.

      1. In the Book of the Prophet Isaiah different voices converge,
      extended over a wide period of time and all placed under the
      name and inspiration of this great witness of the Word of God,
      who lived in the eighth century B.C.

      Within this vast scroll of prophecies, which Jesus also opened
      and read in the synagogue of his village, Nazareth (see Luke
      4:17-19), there is a series of chapters, from 24 to 27, generally
      entitled by scholars "the great apocalypse of Isaiah." In fact, a
      second and minor series is found in chapters 34-35. In pages
      that are often ardent and full of symbols, a powerful poetical
      description is delineated of the divine judgment on history and
      the expectation of salvation on the part of the righteous is
      exalted.

      2. Often, as is the case in the Apocalypse of John, two cities are
      contrasted that are antithetical to one another: the rebellious city,
      incarnated in some historical centers of that time, and the holy
      city, where the faithful gather.

      Well, the canticle we have just heard proclaimed, which is taken
      from Chapter 26 of Isaiah, is precisely the joyous celebration of
      the city of salvation. It rises strong and glorious, because it is the
      Lord himself who has laid the foundations and the walls of
      defense, rendering it a safe and tranquil dwelling (see verse 1).
      He now opens wide the gates to receive the righteous people
      (see verse 2), who seem to repeat the words of the Psalmist
      when, before the Temple of Zion, he exclaims: "Open the gates
      of victory; I will enter and thank the Lord. This is the Lord's own
      gate, where the victors enter" (Psalm 117:19-20).

      3. Whoever enters the city of salvation must have an essential
      requisite: a "firm purpose ... trust in you ... trust" (see Isaiah
      26:3-4). It is faith in God, a solid faith based on him, who is an
      "eternal Rock" (verse 4).

      It is trust, already express in the original Hebrew root of the word
      "amen," a synthesized profession of faith in the Lord, who -- as
      King David sang -- is "my rock, my fortress, my deliverer; My God,
      my rock of refuge, my shield, my saving horn, my stronghold"
      (Psalm 17[18]:2-3; see 2 Samuel 22:2-3).

      The gift that God offers the faithful is peace (see Isaiah 26:3), the
      messianic gift par excellence, synthesis of a life lived in justice,
      freedom and the joy of communion.

      4. It is a gift forcefully confirmed as well in the final verse of the
      Canticle of Isaiah: "O Lord, you mete our peace to us, for it is you
      who have accomplished all we have done" (verse 12). It was this
      verse that caught the attention of the Fathers of the Church: In
      that promise of peace they discerned the words of Christ that
      would resound centuries later: "Peace I leave with you; my peace
      I give to you" (John 14:27).

      In his "Commentary on the Gospel of John," St. Cyril of
      Alexandria recalls that, in giving peace, Jesus gives us his own
      Spirit. Therefore, he does not leave us orphans but through the
      Spirit remains with us. And St. Cyril comments: The prophet
      "prays that the divine Spirit be given to us, through which we have
      been readmitted to friendship with God the Father, we who
      before were far from him because of the sin that reigned in us."
      The commentary then becomes a prayer: "Grant us peace, O
      Lord. Then we will admit we have everything, and it will seem to
      us that he who has received the fullness of Christ does not lack
      anything. Indeed, the fullness of every good is the fact that God
      dwells in us by the Spirit (see Colossians 1:19)" (Volume II,
      Rome, 1994, p. 165).

      5. Let us give one last look to the text of Isaiah. It presents a
      reflection on "the way of the just" (see verse 7) and a declaration
      of adherence to the just decisions of God (see verses 8-9). The
      dominant image is that of the way, classic in the Bible, as
      already declared by Hosea, a prophet who lived just before
      Isaiah: "Let him who is wise understand these things. ... Straight
      are the paths of the Lord, in them the just walk, but sinners
      stumble in them" (Hosea 14:9).

      There is another element in the Canticle of Isaiah, which is very
      thought-provoking also because of its liturgical use in the liturgy
      of lauds. There is, in fact, a mention of dawn, awaited after a
      night dedicated to seeking God: "My soul yearns for you in the
      night, yes, my spirit within me keeps vigil for you" (Isaiah 26:9).

      It is precisely at the dawn of the day, when work begins and daily
      life already pulsates in the streets of the city, that the faithful one
      must again be determined to walk "in the ways of your
      judgments, O Lord" (verse 8), hoping in him and in his Word,
      only source of peace.

      Now the words of the Psalmist come to his lips, who professes
      his faith since dawn: "O God, you are my God -- for you I long! For
      you by body yearns; for you my soul thirsts. ... For your love is
      better than life" (Psalm 62[63]:2,4). With his spirit reassured, he
      can thus address the new day.

      * * *

      Let Guardian Angels Guide You, Pope Urges

      VATICAN CITY, OCT. 2, 2002 (Zenit.org).- John Paul II appealed
      to believers, especially young people, to rediscover the help of
      guardian angels in their lives.

      At the end of today's general audience, which gathered more
      than 15,000 people in St. Peter's Square, the Pope reminded the
      faithful that on Oct. 2 the Church celebrates the memorial of the
      Guardian Angels.

      This celebration encourages us "to think of these heavenly
      protectors that God's provident care has put next to each
      person," the Holy Father said.

      Then, addressing young people in particular, the Pope said: "let
      yourselves be led by the angels, so that your life will be a faithful
      living of the divine commandments."

      Later, seeing several people in wheelchairs at the audience,
      John Paul II addressed the sick so that "helped by the guardian
      angels, you will unite your sufferings to those of Christ for the
      spiritual renewal of the whole society."

      Several newlyweds, dressed in their wedding clothes, were on
      hand to see the Pope. John Paul II encouraged them to appeal
      "frequently to your guardian angels so that your family will be a
      place of mutual understanding and increasing unity in Christ."

      The memorial of the Guardian Angels, who are referred to in
      many passages of the Old and New Testament, was already
      celebrated in the year 800 in England. It became a feast for the
      universal Church in 1608.

      * * *

      Nuclear Arms Are Incompatible with Peace, Vatican Tells U.N.

      Representative Laments Stalled Process of Disarmament

      NEW YORK, OCT. 2, 2002 (Zenit.org).- The Vatican told the
      United Nations there is no moral justification for military and
      political doctrines that promote the proliferation or stocking of
      nuclear weapons.

      On Tuesday, when addressing the 1st Committee of the 57th
      Session of the U.N. General Assembly on General and
      Complete Disarmament, Archbishop Renato Martino, head of
      the Vatican delegation, expressed the Church's concern over the
      stagnation of the disarmament process.

      "There can be no moral acceptance of military doctrines that
      embody the permanence of nuclear weapons," said Archbishop
      Martino, who on that same day was appointed by the Pope as
      president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace.

      "They are incompatible with the peace we seek for the 21st
      century; they cannot be justified. These weapons are
      instruments of death and destruction," Archbishop Martino
      added.

      "The Holy See is convinced that in the sphere of nuclear
      weapons, the banning of tests and of the further development of
      these weapons, disarmament and nonproliferation are closely
      linked and must be achieved as quickly as possible under
      effective international controls," he added.

      On June 13, 2001, the Vatican adhered to the Comprehensive
      Test Ban Treaty. It also supports the Non-Proliferation Treaty
      (NPT).

      Referring to earlier efforts to eliminate the weapons, the
      archbishop noted that "the hopes raised in 2000 were dashed in
      2002 when it became clear that the nuclear weapons states are
      not adhering" to these agreements.

      "How can that which was agreed to in 2000 be cast aside just
      two years later?" asked the archbishop, who has represented
      the Pope at the United Nations for the past 16 years.

      "It must not be forgotten that genuine multilateral efforts are
      required to achieve nuclear disarmament," he said. "These, by
      their very nature, possess the potential to guarantee universal
      and permanent norms which bind all states."

      "In this respect, the NPT remains the centerpiece of the global
      nuclear nonproliferation regime and the value of the NPT
      depends on all parties honoring their obligations," the
      archbishop continued. "[It] plays a critical role in efforts to prevent
      the spread of nuclear weapons, especially to terrorists and
      states that support them."

      According to the Vatican representative, the "old policies of
      nuclear deterrence, which prevailed during the time of the Cold
      War, must lead now to concrete disarmament measures, based
      on dialogue and multilateral negotiation, which are essential
      values in the disarmament process."

      "Through the instruments of international law, they facilitate the
      peaceful resolution of controversies, help better mutual
      understanding and foster a climate of trust, cooperation and
      respect between all states," he added. "In this way they promote
      the effective affirmation of the culture of life and peace, which is
      based upon the values of responsibility, solidarity and dialogue."

      The papal representative also insisted on the need to prohibit
      biological and chemical weapons, and to create appropriate
      instruments to ensure that international treaties on this matter
      are monitored and respected. Archbishop Martino also
      emphasized the need to reinforce present measures geared to
      promoting disarmament and the illicit sales of small-caliber
      weapons.

      * * *

      Vatican Aide's U.N. Address on Disarmament

      Weapons Incompatible with Peace, Says Archbishop Martino

      NEW YORK, OCT. 2, 2002 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of an
      address given Tuesday by Archbishop Renato Martino, head of
      the Holy See's delegation at a session of the U.N. General
      Assembly on General and Complete Disarmament.

      Mr. Chairman,

      The Holy See congratulates you on your election as Chairman
      and my Delegation assures you of its cooperation in your
      leadership of this important committee.

      The General Assembly has considered the theme of "General
      and complete disarmament" annually since 1959. The threats to
      international peace and security faced by the world today are in
      some important respects different from the threats of 40 years
      ago.

      When we met last year, the horror of the terrorist attacks on New
      York and Washington was fresh in our minds and our resolve to
      stamp out terrorism strong. While governments continue to be
      deeply concerned about terrorism, our role in this Committee is
      to ensure that the processes of disarmament continue.

      The order imposed by the circumstances of the Cold War no
      longer exists, and our thinking on disarmament must reflect the
      new realities of today. For instance, by signing, on May 24, 2002,
      the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty, States that were once
      adversaries agreed to reduce the number of strategic nuclear
      warheads from 2,200 to 1,700 by the year 2012. While the
      reductions could have gone further and even though the Treaty
      would have been more reassuring if it provided for irreversible
      disarmament, transparency and effective verification, the
      agreement should be welcomed as a new sign of cooperation.
      The world awaits and in fact seriously needs more of the same.

      Practical disarmament measures to consolidate peace, regional
      disarmament agreements, and especially the measures
      adopted to curb the illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons
      can be re-energized. These steps, along with the strengthening
      of the relationship between disarmament and development, can
      have tremendous effects by improving the conditions for human
      security throughout the world.

      Mr. Chairman, the threats posed by biological and chemical
      weapons have received much attention, partly because rather
      small amounts of material can have such pervasive and
      devastating effects. All of us have seen the fear and hysteria that
      trace, but deadly amounts of anthrax can produce. Because
      these threats respect no borders, multilateral efforts towards
      their elimination are absolutely necessary. The world's security
      now depends on how well States can adapt to these new
      circumstances. It is a duty of the first-order.

      During these next few months, the Fifth Review Conference of
      the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) will re-convene to
      complete work on negotiating a legally binding verification
      protocol. The first session of this Review can hardly be termed a
      success.

      A re-energization of this process is clearly called for, and this is
      the reason why the Holy See decided to accede to the BWC on 4
      January 2002. As stated in the Holy See Declaration attached to
      the instrument of accession to the BWC "the tragic events of 11
      September 2001 have led to a clearer and more widespread
      awareness of the need to build a culture of multilateral dialogue
      and a climate of trust between all the members of the human
      family. At this particular point in history, instruments of
      cooperation and prevention constitute one of the most effective
      safeguards in the face of heinous acts such as the use of
      biological weapons, capable of indiscriminately striking at
      innocent civilian populations".

      When the BWC, prohibiting the development, production and
      stockpiling of bio-weapons was opened for signature in 1972, it
      was the first-ever arms control convention to completely ban a
      whole class of weapons.

      However, it lacked mechanisms for monitoring or verifying
      compliance. In 1995, work began to draft concrete measures to
      ensure countries comply with the Convention. The setback that
      occurred at the Review last year must be overcome because the
      future Biological Weapons prohibition regime must be
      strengthened.

      The 145 States Parties to the BWC should agree on a
      comprehensive list of measures, perhaps to be implemented in
      stages, that will ensure a strengthening of the BWC through
      increased transparency and an increase in potential detection
      and deterrence of prohibited activities. Such an approach will
      build confidence in the BWC.

      In the past year, two important conferences -- involving the
      Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the
      Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) -- were held in the nuclear
      weapons field. Here again, troubling signs of discord were
      evident.

      As stated in the Holy See Declaration attached to the instrument
      of accession to the CTBT on 13 June 2001, "the Holy See is
      convinced that in the sphere of nuclear weapons, the banning of
      tests and of the further development of these weapons,
      disarmament and non-proliferation are closely linked and must
      be achieved as quickly as possible under effective international
      controls".

      A major step forward was taken when the CTBT was opened for
      signature in 1996. When the Conference on Facilitating
      Entry-into-Force of the CTBT was held in 2001, 161 States had
      signed and 87 had ratified the Treaty. But now the momentum
      appears to have stalled. While all nations and peoples must be
      grateful that a moratorium on testing is still holding, the
      resistance to achieving the requisite number of ratifications
      threatens a collapse of the architecture of the non-proliferation
      regime that has painstakingly been built over many years.

      The second conference, the First Preparatory Conference for the
      2005 NPT Review, also revealed the stalled nature of nuclear
      disarmament. At the 2000 NPT Review, the Nuclear Weapons
      States pledged "an unequivocal undertaking to accomplish the
      total elimination of their nuclear arsenals". A program of 13
      Practical Steps was adopted for systematic and progressive
      nuclear disarmament. But the hopes raised in 2000 were
      dashed in 2002 when it became clear that the Nuclear Weapons
      States are not adhering to the 13 Steps.

      The ABM Treaty, now abandoned, and the CTBT were both
      integral to the 13 Steps. How can that which was agreed to in
      2000 be cast aside just two years later? It must not be forgotten
      that genuine multilateral efforts are required to achieve nuclear
      disarmament. These, by their very nature, possess the potential
      to guarantee universal and permanent norms which bind all
      States. In this respect, the NPT remains the centrepiece of the
      global nuclear non-proliferation regime and the value of the NPT
      depends on all parties honouring their obligations. It plays a
      critical role in efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons,
      especially to terrorists and States that support them.

      Mr. Chairman, the concern of the Holy See increases as we see
      the non-proliferation regime, with the NPT as its cornerstone, in
      disarray. The old policies of nuclear deterrence, which prevailed
      during the time of the Cold War, must lead now to concrete
      disarmament measures, based on dialogue and multilateral
      negotiation, which are essential values in the disarmament
      process. Through the instruments of international law, they
      facilitate the peaceful resolution of controversies, help better
      mutual understanding and foster a climate of trust, cooperation
      and respect between all States. In this way they promote the
      effective affirmation of the culture of life and peace, which is
      based upon the values of responsibility, solidarity and dialogue.

      The Holy See has stated in this Committee many times and
      repeats now: There can be no moral acceptance of military
      doctrines that embody the permanence of nuclear weapons.
      They are incompatible with the peace we seek for the 21st
      century; they cannot be justified. These weapons are
      instruments of death and destruction.

      The cooperation among governments, including the military,
      humanitarian organizations and other representatives of civil
      society in implementing the Landmines Convention has been
      exemplary in building up trust and goodwill among all concerned
      groups. The physical or ideological distance between concerned
      groups or similar difficulties facing disarmament activities need
      not be an insurmountable obstacle. "In this era of
      interdependence, it is no longer tolerable to condemn, through
      inaction, entire populations to live in fear and precariousness"
      (Address of the Holy See to the Fourth Meeting of Parties to the
      Ottawa Convention, Geneva, 19 September 2002, n. 8).

      Mr. Chairman, this Committee has done valuable work over
      many years in raising the norms and standards for disarmament
      in all its aspects. Though the cycles of history bring with them
      both advances and retreats, we must keep our minds focused
      on our goal of reducing the causes of war. Pope John Paul II's
      World Day of Peace Message for 2002, entitled "No Peace
      without Justice, No Justice without Forgiveness", expressed a
      great hope, "based on the conviction that evil, the mysterium
      iniquitatis, does not have the final word in human affairs" (n.1).

      The techniques of mediation, negotiation and verification are all
      being advanced today. They provide a basis of hope for
      humanity. These are the steps we must support in the
      continuing quest to eliminate the weapons of war.

      Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

      * * *

      Bracing for the Worst in Belarus

      Strict Legislation on Religions Would Complicate Life of Catholic
      Church

      MINSK, Belarus, OCT. 2, 2002 (Zenit.org).- The Belarusian
      Parliament approved amendments that would make its religious
      law one of the most repressive in Europe.

      The legislation, which prohibits the registration of religious
      communities that were not established during the Soviet era,
      was adopted overwhelmingly today by the upper house, 46-to-2.

      If President Aleksandr Lukashenko sanctions the new norm, all
      religious activity not registered administratively, will be outside
      the law.

      The purpose of the draft law is to favor the establishment of the
      Orthodox Church, Stanislav Buko, the president of the state
      Commission for Religious and National Affairs, told Parliament.

      "The law takes into consideration Belarusian tradition, which
      needs to protect itself from new cults and sects," he said.

      The text of the law recognizes "the determinant role of the
      Orthodox Church both in the historical destiny and spiritual and
      cultural development as well as in the traditions of the
      Belarusian people."

      According to the text, the possibility of publishing texts and of
      imparting religious education is limited to confessions that have
      10 registered communities, one of which was registered before
      1982. At that time, the Communist regime did not recognize
      many Christian communities, including the Greek-Catholics.

      About half of Belarus' 10.1 million people are avowed believers.
      Of those, 80% are Orthodox, 14% are Catholic and 2% are
      Protestant, according to the Institute of Sociology of the Academy
      of Sciences.

      Last weekend, during a congress organized by the Charismatic
      Renewal in Czestochowa, Archimandrite Sergiusz Jan Gajek of
      Minsk, of the Greek-Catholic Church of Belarus, warned that the
      new law would make the Church's evangelization efforts in
      Belarus extremely difficult.

      "We are used to clandestinity and persecution, but we do not
      want them to apply euthanasia or suicide to us. Pray for our
      witness in former Soviet countries," said the priest, who is also a
      consultor of the Vatican Congregation for Eastern Churches.

      * * *

      CATALOGUE OF LINKS

      1. HOW TO USE LINKS -- RealPlayer

      Roman catholic News is very happy to announce new exciting
      links available to you, our fine subscribers. Some links require
      Realplayer a software program that allows you to see live
      television and hear audio recordings as well as listen to live
      radio. The software is free. To obtain your free copy go to EWTN
      Live TV and Radio on the link below and scroll down until you
      find the Download Free RealPlayer link and click it on.


      2. Live EWTN TV and Radio
      http://www.ewtn.com/audiovideo/index.htm

      CONTAINS:

      • Live EWTN TV - English • EWTN AM/FM RADIO
      • Live EWTN TV - Spanish • Catholic World Today Radio
      • Today's Homily (Video) • Audio of Today's Homily
      • Audio of Pope's Wednesday Audience • Radio Catolica Mundial
      • Audio of EWTN's The World Over • Mother Angelica Live (Video)
      • Audio Library • Life On The Rock (Video)
      • The Journey Home (Video) • EWTN Religious Catalogue
      (Video)

      Send EWTN donations online:
      https://www.ewtn.com/ewtn/ssl/donation/donation_ewtn.asp

      * * *

      3. Today's Lectionary Readings Text
      http://www.nccbuscc.org/nab/100302.htm

      * * *

      4.DIVINE OFFICE TEXTS & AUDIO ONLINE:

      OFFICE OF READINGS, TEXTS
      http://www.universalis.com/cgi-bin/display/-600/USA/Readings.html

      MORNING, EVENING & NIGHT PRAYERS, TEXTS:
      http://www.liturgyhours.org

      AUDIO RECORDINGS OF THE DIVINE OFFICE: recited by the
      Monks of Adoration:
      http://www.monksofadoration.org/audiolit.html

      * * *

      5. Polish Rosary Hour by the Conventual Franciscans
      http://www.rosaryhour.net/ra/program.ram

      * * *

      6. CHANTED ROSARY ONLINE
      http://www.monksofadoration.org/rosarych.html

      DOWNLOAD FREE SCRIPTURAL ROSARY
      http://www.virtualrosary.org/

      * * *

      7. CHAPLET OF DIVINE MERCY ONLINE
      http://www.suba.com/~gunkel/divinemercy/dmvirtchap.htm

      * * *

      8. BIOGRAPHY OF MAMA GILI WITH PHOTO
      http://www.holyfaceofjesus.com/mama.html
      Then once inside click on
      PRAYER FOR THE BEATIFICATION OF MAMA GILI

      Cause of Mama Gili as Servant of God (Part 1)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/33

      Cause of Mama Gili as Servant of God (Part 2)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/37

      Need a Miracle?
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/55

      Dolores Immacolata "Mama" Gili (1892-1985)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/117

      MAMA GILI GUILD

      The Mama Gili Guild was established several years ago to
      gather, collect, and publish information on Dolores Immacolata
      Gili (1892-1985) for an investigation into her cause as a Servant
      of God, as well as to promote her cause and to perpetuate her
      cult by directing prayer groups assembled in her honor. It has
      continuously enjoyed the ecclesiastical approval of Theodore
      Cardinal McCarrick, and the Most Reverend John Joseph Myers,
      Archbishop of Newark, New Jersey.

      Call or write today regarding favors granted through the
      intercession of Dolores Immacolata "Mama" Gili, or, for more
      information about the cause of her investigation for canonization to:

      Rev. Dante DiGirolamo, Director
      Mama Gili Guild
      P. O. Box 455
      Kearny, New Jersey 07032
      Phone (973) 412-1170
      Fax (973) 412-7011

      * * *

      HOW TO POST A QUESTION TO THE CATHOLIC REFERENCE
      DESK AND HOW TO SUBMIT AN ARTICLE FOR PUBLICATION

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      * * *

      EUCHARISTIC PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE SORROWFUL
      HEART OF MARY

      When the Eucharistic host is elevated at Mass say:

      "Eternal Father, through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of
      Mary, I offer you the crucified Body of Your dearly beloved Son,
      Jesus Christ, in reparation for all the sins committed against you
      and for the conversion and salvation of the whole world."

      When the Eucharistic chalice is elevated at Mass say:

      "Eternal Father, through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of
      Mary, I offer you the precious Blood of Your dearly beloved Son,
      Jesus Christ, in reparation for all the sins committed against you
      and for the conversion and salvation of the whole world."

      * * *

      DAILY REMINDER

      "during this important time, as the eve of the new millennium
      approaches unity among all Christians of the various
      confessions will increase until they reach full communion." John
      Paul II, Tertio Millennio Adveniente, 16

      "Keep close to the Mother of God as if you were the child Jesus
      clinging to her robes while walking down a dusty and busy
      crowded street and you'll always be safe."

      * * *

      ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS ARCHIVES
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      the URL:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News

      This will give you the archive of all of the articles in all issues.
      There are four ways to access archived articles: (1) Go to the
      Home Page panel on the far left and click on the word
      "Messages" just below the word "Home"; (2) then click on the
      articles posted by date; (3) or click on the blue Arabic numerals
      in the box for the month in the yearly calendar window at the
      bottom of the page; (4) or type in a keyword in the long
      rectangular white box alongside the long rectangular button that
      reads SEARCH ARCHIVE, and then click that button.

      * * *

      __________________________________________________
      © Copyright 2002 John N. Lupia for Roman Catholic News at the
      URL: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News,
      unless specified otherwise. All rights reserved. Neither this work
      nor any part of it may be reproduced, distributed, performed or
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      permission in writing from the copyright owners. All articles from
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