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Volume 2, No. 30

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  • jlupia2
    ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS Volume 2, Issue 30 WEDNESDAY 6 February, 2002 Feast of St. Paul Miki and Companions Today s Lectionary Readings
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 5, 2002
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      ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS

      Volume 2, Issue 30
      WEDNESDAY 6 February, 2002

      Feast of St. Paul Miki and Companions

      Today's Lectionary Readings
      http://www.nccbuscc.org/nab/020602.htm

      WEAR THE BROWN SCAPULAR OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT
      CARMEL AND PRAY THE ROSARY DAILY FOR THE
      CONVERSION OF THE WHOLE WORLD AND FOR CHURCH
      UNITY

      * * *

      INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • John Paul II´s Message for Lent 2002
      "You Received Without Paying, Give Without Pay"
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • ARCHBISHOP CORDES: RESIST THE TEMPTATION TO
      SELF-SUFFICIENCY
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • PUBLICATION OF PAPAL MESSAGE FOR LENT 2002
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • AUDIENCES
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • OTHER PONTIFICAL ACTS
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Icon of Virgin of Kazan a Key to Dialogue with Orthodox
      Mounting Hope on Eve of Cardinal Kasper´s Visit to Patriarch
      Alexy II
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Evaluation of Holy See´s Charitable Works Over 30 Years
      By Pontifical Council "Cor Unum"
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Sizing Up Guatemala Amid Strife and Sects
      New President of Episcopal Conference Outlines Challenges
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • More Education Urged on Use of Internet
      Archbishop John Foley Addresses Italian Catholic Journalists
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Ricardo J. Cardinal Vidal Celebrates 71st Birthday
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------

      * * *

      John Paul II´s Message for Lent 2002
      "You Received Without Paying, Give Without Pay"

      VATICAN CITY, FEB. 5, 2002 (Zenit.org).- Following is John Paul
      II's Message for Lent 2002, whose theme is "You Received
      Without Paying, Give Without Pay." It was presented today in the
      Vatican Press Office.

      MESSAGE OF THE HOLY FATHER FOR LENT 2002

      Dear Brothers and Sisters,

      1. We are preparing to follow the path of Lent, which will lead us
      to the solemn celebration of the central mystery of faith, the
      mystery of the Passion, Death, and Resurrection of Christ. We
      are preparing for the favorable time that the Church offers the
      faithful, so that they may contemplate the work of salvation
      accomplished by our Lord on the Cross. The heavenly Father's
      saving plan was completed in the free and total gift to us of the
      only begotten Son. "No one takes my life from me, but I lay it
      down of my own accord" (Jn 10:18), Jesus declares, leaving no
      doubt that he decides to sacrifice his own life for the salvation of
      the world. In confirmation of so great a gift of love, the Redeemer
      goes on: "Greater love has no one than this, that a man lay down
      his life for his friends" (Jn 15:13).

      Lent, the providential time for conversion, helps us to
      contemplate this stupendous mystery of love. It is a return to the
      roots of our faith, so that by pondering the measureless gift of
      grace which is Redemption, we cannot fail to realize that all has
      been given to us by God's loving initiative. In order to meditate
      upon this aspect of the mystery of salvation, I have chosen as the
      theme for this year's Lenten Message the Lord's words: "You
      received without paying, give without pay" (Mt 10:8).

      2. God has freely given us his Son: who has deserved or could
      ever deserve such a privilege? Saint Paul says: "All have sinned
      and have fallen short of the glory of God, but they are justified by
      his grace as a gift" (Rom 3:23-24). In his infinite mercy God loved
      us, not permitting himself to be blocked by the grievous state of
      separation to which man had been consigned by sin. He
      graciously stooped down to our weakness, and made it the
      cause of a new and still more wondrous outpouring of his love.
      The Church does not cease to proclaim this mystery of infinite
      goodness, exalting God's free choice and his desire not to
      condemn man but to draw him back into communion with
      himself.

      "You received without paying, give without pay." May these words
      of the Gospel echo in the heart of all Christian communities on
      their penitential pilgrimage to Easter. May Lent, recalling the
      mystery of the Lord's Death and Resurrection, lead all Christians
      to marvel in their heart of hearts at the greatness of such a gift.
      Yes! We have received without pay. Is not our entire life marked
      by God's kindness? The beginning of life and its marvellous
      development: this is a gift. And because it is gift, life can never be
      regarded as a possession or as private property, even if the
      capabilities we now have to improve the quality of life can lead
      us to think that man is the "master" of life. The achievements of
      medicine and biotechnology can sometimes lead man to think of
      himself as his own creator, and to succumb to the temptation of
      tampering with "the tree of life" (Gn 3:24).

      It is also worth repeating here that not everything that is
      technically possible is morally acceptable. Scientific work aimed
      at securing a quality of life more in keeping with human dignity is
      admirable, but it must never be forgotten that human life is a gift,
      and that it remains precious even when marked by suffering and
      limitations. A gift to be accepted and to be loved at all times:
      received without pay and to be placed without pay at the service
      of others.

      3. In setting before us the example of Christ offering himself for
      us on Calvary, Lent helps us in a unique way to understand that
      life is redeemed in him. Through the Holy Spirit, Jesus renews
      our life and makes us sharers in the divine life which draws us
      into the intimate life of God and enables us to experience his
      love for us. This is a sublime gift, which the Christian cannot fail
      to proclaim with joy. In his Gospel, Saint John writes: "This is
      eternal life, that they know you the only true God, and Jesus
      Christ whom you have sent" (Jn 17:3). This life is passed on to
      us in Baptism, and we must nourish it constantly by responding
      to it faithfully, both individually and communally, through prayer,
      the celebration of the Sacraments and evangelical witness.
      Since we have received this life freely, we must in turn offer it
      freely to our brothers and sisters. This is what Jesus asked of
      the disciples when he sent them out as his witnesses in the
      world: "You received without paying, give without pay." And the
      first gift to be given is the gift of a holy life, bearing witness to the
      freely given love of God. May the Lenten journey be for all
      believers an unceasing summons to enter more deeply into this
      special vocation of ours. As believers, we must be open to a life
      marked by "gratuitousness," by the giving of ourselves
      unreservedly to God and neighbour.

      4. "What do you have," Saint Paul asks, "that you did not
      receive?" (1 Cor 4:7). The demand which follows this recognition
      is that of loving our brothers and sisters, and of dedicating
      ourselves to them. The more needy they are, the more urgent the
      believer's duty to serve them. Does not God permit human need
      so that by responding to the needs of others we may learn to free
      ourselves from our egoism and to practice authentic Gospel
      love? The command of Jesus is clear: "If you love those who love
      you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax-collectors do
      the same?" (Mt 5:46). The world prizes human relationships
      based on self-interest and personal gain, and this fosters an
      egocentric vision of life, in which too often there is no room for
      the poor and weak. Every person, even the least gifted, must be
      welcomed and loved for themselves, regardless of their qualities
      and defects. Indeed, the greater their hardship, the more they
      must be the object of our practical love. This is the love to which
      the Church, through her countless institutions, bears witness in
      accepting responsibility for the sick, the marginalized, the poor,
      and the exploited. In this way, Christians become apostles of
      hope and builders of the civilization of love.

      It is highly significant that Jesus spoke the words "You received
      without paying, give without pay," as he sent the Apostles out to
      spread the Gospel of salvation, which is his first and foremost
      gift to humanity. Christ wants his Kingdom, which is already
      close at hand (cf. Mt 10:5ff.), to be spread through gestures of
      gratuitous love accomplished by his disciples. This is what the
      Apostles did in the early days of Christianity, and those who met
      them saw them as bearers of a message greater than
      themselves. In our own day, too, the good done by believers
      becomes a sign, and often an invitation to believe. When, like the
      Good Samaritan, Christians respond to the needs of their
      neighbour, theirs is never merely material assistance. It is
      always a proclamation of the Kingdom as well, and speaks of
      the full meaning of life, hope, and love.

      5. Dear Brothers and Sisters! Let this be how we prepare to live
      this Lent: in practical generosity towards the poorest of our
      brothers and sisters! By opening our hearts to them, we realize
      ever more deeply that what we give to others is our response to
      the many gifts which the Lord continues to give to us. We have
      received without paying, let us give without pay!

      What better time is there than Lent for offering this testimony of
      gratuitousness which the world so badly needs? In the very love
      which God has for us, there lies the call to give ourselves freely
      to others in turn. I thank all those throughout the world -- lay
      people, religious and priests -- who offer this witness of charity.
      May it be true of all Christians, whatever the circumstances in
      which they live.

      May the Virgin Mary, Mother of Fair Love and Hope, be our guide
      and strength on this Lenten journey. Assuring you all of an
      affectionate remembrance in my prayers, I gladly impart my
      Apostolic Blessing to each of you, especially to those engaged
      day after day on the many frontiers of charity.

      From the Vatican, October 4, 2001, Feast of Saint Francis of
      Assisi.

      JOANNES PAULUS II

      * * *

      ARCHBISHOP CORDES: RESIST THE TEMPTATION TO
      SELF-SUFFICIENCY

      VATICAN CITY, FEB 5, 2002 (VIS) - In the Holy See Press Office
      this
      morning, Archbishop Paul Josef Cordes, president of the
      Pontifical Council
      "Cor Unum," presented the Pope's message for Lent 2002.

      Archbishop Cordes began by recalling that "Cor Unum" was
      founded by Pope Paul VI a little more than 30 years ago on July
      15, 1971; and that up to the year 2001, popes have channelled
      funds to the value of 87,510,201 U.S. dollars through the
      dicastery. Moreover, as of January 31 2002, more than two
      million Euros have been collected in response to the Pope's call
      for offerings for the day of fasting on December 14, 2001.

      For its 30th anniversary, "Cor Unum" published the book "Ars
      Caritatis" which is a collection of Papal addresses to members
      of the dicastery together with two reports; one on the John Paul II
      Foundation for the Sahel and another on the "Populorum
      Progressio" Foundation for Latin America.

      The president of "Cor Unum" went on to speak of the Lenten
      message in which, he said, "we find a call to help those in need.
      ... The key theme of this year's message is the conviction that we
      have received much. ... In an age in which man wishes to live in
      complete autonomy," the temptation to "be self-sufficient, to have
      no need of others," is countered by an idea often repeated by
      John Paul II and that may be found in the pastoral constitution
      "Gaudium et Spes": "man can fully discover his true self only in a
      sincere giving of himself."

      There followed a speech from Jean Vanier, the Canadian
      founder of the first "L'Arche" community and "one of the great
      initiators of Catholic voluntary work." The aim of the foundation is
      "to give a family, a community, to those who have mental
      handicaps, so offering them the chance to learn, as far as
      possible, to live their daily lives independently, working, living in
      communion with others and meeting God."

      "For 37 years now," said Jean Vanier, "I have had the privilege of
      living with men and women with learning disabilities who have
      often known the pain of being mocked, rejected and excluded.
      People with mental handicaps are among the most oppressed
      people; they are not wanted in our stressful world of competition.
      ... I would like to bear witness here however to the 'power' of
      these so-called 'powerless' people, their capacity ... to help
      people become more truly human, to lead people into the
      mystery of the Gospels and a meeting with Jesus."

      He indicated that in the 120 'L'Arche' communities and the 1,500
      communities of 'Faith and Light,' volunteers share their lives on a
      daily basis with disabled men and women. "Many volunteers," he
      highlighted, "live an experience of transformation."

      "Many other young people," he went on, "today want to go to
      poorer areas of the world, to share their lives with people in the
      slums, in refugee camps, in schools for disadvantaged children.
      ... They realize how closed and prejudiced they were before, how
      they were only concerned about their own immediate family or
      group or religion or culture, and they begin to understand how
      richer cultures oppress the poorer ones. This shared experience
      with suffering and weak people helps them to discover what it
      means to be part of the human family. They discover that to be
      human and to be Christian means to love people. ... Many young
      volunteers come to our communities wanting to do good to the
      poor, but what they discover is that it is the weak and the poor
      who are healing and transforming them."

      * * *

      PUBLICATION OF PAPAL MESSAGE FOR LENT 2002

      VATICAN CITY, FEB 5, 2002 (VIS) - Made public today was John
      Paul II's message for Lent 2002, the theme of which is: "You
      received without paying, give without pay." The text bears the date
      of October 4, 2001, and has been published in Italian, English,
      French, Spanish, German, Portuguese and Polish. Some
      extracts from the message are given below:

      "'You received without paying, give without pay.' May these words
      of the Gospel echo in the heart of all Christian communities on
      their penitential pilgrimage to Easter. May Lent, recalling the
      mystery of the Lord's Death and Resurrection, lead all Christians
      to marvel in their heart of hearts at the greatness of such a gift.

      "Yes! We have received without pay. Is not our entire life marked
      by God's kindness? The beginning of life and its marvelous
      development: this is a gift. And because it is gift, life can never be
      regarded as a possession or as private property, even if the
      capabilities we now have to improve the quality of life can lead
      us to think that man is the 'master' of life."

      "It is also worth repeating here that not everything that is
      technically possible is morally acceptable. Scientific work aimed
      at securing a quality of life more in keeping with human dignity is
      admirable, but it must never be forgotten that human life is a gift,
      and that it remains precious even when marked by suffering and
      limitations. A gift to be accepted and to be loved at all times:
      received without pay and to be placed without pay at the service
      of others."

      "Through the Holy Spirit, Jesus renews our life and makes us
      sharers in the divine life which draws us into the intimate life of
      God and enables us to experience His love for us. ... This life is
      passed on to us in Baptism, and we must nourish it constantly
      by responding to it faithfully, both individually and communally,
      through prayer, the celebration of the Sacraments and
      evangelical witness.

      "Since we have received this life freely, we must in turn offer it
      freely to our brothers and sisters. ... And the first gift to be given is
      the gift of a holy life, bearing witness to the freely given love of
      God. May the Lenten journey be for all believers an unceasing
      summons to enter more deeply into this special vocation of
      ours."

      "The world prizes human relationships based on self-interest
      and personal gain, and this fosters an egocentric vision of life, in
      which too often there is no room for the poor and weak. Every
      person, even the least gifted, must be welcomed and loved for
      themselves, regardless of their qualities and defects. Indeed,
      the greater their hardship, the more they must be the object of
      our practical love. This is the love to which the Church, through
      her countless institutions, bears witness in accepting
      responsibility for the sick, the marginalized, the poor and the
      exploited. In this way, Christians become apostles of hope and
      builders of the civilization of love."

      "Dear Brothers and Sisters! Let this be how we prepare to live
      this Lent: in practical generosity towards the poorest of our
      brothers and sisters! By opening our hearts to them, we realize
      ever more deeply that what we give to others is our response to
      the many gifts which the Lord continues to give to us. We have
      received without paying, let us give without pay!

      "What better time is there than Lent for offering this testimony of
      gratuitousness which the world so badly needs? In the very love
      which God has for us, there lies the call to give ourselves freely
      to others in turn. I thank all those throughout the world - lay
      people, religious and priests - who offer this witness of charity.
      May it be true of all Christians, whatever the circumstances in
      which they live."

      * * *

      AUDIENCES

      VATICAN CITY, FEB 5, 2002 (VIS) - The Holy Father today
      received in separate audiences:

      - Archbishop Stephen Zurbriggen, apostolic nuncio in Lithuania,
      Estonia and Latvia, apostolic administrator "ad nutum Sanctae
      Sedis" of the apostolic administration of Estonia.
      - Four prelates from the Episcopal Conference of Argentina, on
      their "ad limina" visit:
      - Bishop Joaquin Pina Batllevell S.J., of Puerto Iguazu.
      - Bishop Antonio Juan Baseotto C.SS.R., of Anatuya.
      - Bishop Agustin Roberto Radrizzani S.D.B., of Lomas de
      Zamora.
      - Bishop Rinaldo Fidel Bredice of Santa Rosa.

      * * *

      OTHER PONTIFICAL ACTS

      VATICAN CITY, FEB 5, 2002 (VIS) - The Holy Father:

      - Appointed Msgr. Gerard Hanna, vicar general of Wagga Wagga
      (area 24,000, population 206,000, Catholics 62,000, priests 55,
      religious 131), Australia, as bishop of the same diocese. The
      bishop-elect was born in Armindale, Australia, in 1941 and
      ordained a priest in 1968. He succeeds Bishop William John
      Brennan whose resignation from the pastoral care of the same
      diocese the Holy Father accepted, in accordance with Canon
      401, para. 2, of the Code of Canon Law.

      - Appointed Archbishop Marco Dino Brogi O.F.M., apostolic
      nuncio in Sudan and apostolic delegate in Somalia, as apostolic
      nuncio in the Arab Republic of Egypt.

      - Appointed Archbishop Giuseppe Pinto, apostolic nuncio in
      Senegal and apostolic delegate in Mauritania, as apostolic
      nuncio in Mali and Cape Verde.

      - Appointed Archbishop Adolfo Tito Yllana, apostolic nuncio in
      Papua New Guinea, as apostolic nuncio in the Solomon Islands.

      * * *

      Icon of Virgin of Kazan a Key to Dialogue with Orthodox
      Mounting Hope on Eve of Cardinal Kasper´s Visit to Patriarch
      Alexy II

      MOSCOW, FEB. 5, 2002 (Zenit.org).- The Marian icon of Kazan is
      again at the heart of the ecumenical dialogue between the
      Catholic Church and the Russian Orthodox Patriarchate of
      Moscow.

      Russian agencies reported that the day after the Assisi meeting,
      the Pope had a private talk with two representatives (Metropolitan
      Pitirim and Bishop Hilarion) of Patriarch Alexy II, and expressed
      his hope to visit Moscow and his desire to restore the holy
      image.

      Russian sources, and a statement on the patriarchate's Internet
      site, explain that Bishop Hilarion reiterated Moscow's position,
      according to which the patriarch "in principle agrees to see the
      Pope."

      But, the bishop added, the meeting can only be held "after a
      common position is reached on the principal questions of
      inter-ecclesial relations" -- namely, Rome's alleged proselytism
      and the issue of Ukrainian Greek-Catholics. He further stated
      that "the Moscow Patriarchate regards the relations between the
      two Churches at present as extremely unsatisfactory."

      Yet, Bishop Hilarion said the presence in Moscow of the
      president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity,
      Cardinal Walter Kasper, might "contribute constructive elements
      capable of improving in a substantial way" the state of such
      relations. Cardinal Kasper is due to visit the Russian capital
      Feb. 21-22.

      The cardinal will meet Alexy II and Metropolitan Kirill, director of
      the Department of Foreign Ecclesial Relations.

      The posture of openness was confirmed in statements of the
      Reverend Andrej Elisejev, director of the patriarchate's
      inter-Christian relations, which were published today by the
      Italian newspaper Avvenire. The Reverend Elisejev spoke of
      "great hopes."

      Regarding the question of the Marian icon, he said: "The return
      of the Kazan icon would be welcomed by our Church as a very
      friendly gesture. However, there must be no special conditions."

      Legend and mystery surround the icon of Our Lady of Kazan. In
      1552 Czar Ivan the Terrible conquered the city, and in 1579 the
      icon appeared miraculously in Kazan following a devastating fire.

      Matrjona Ounicina, a 12-year-old girl, saw the Virgin three times
      in her dreams, who ordered her to excavate a place. The girl
      carried out the request, informing Metropolitan Germogen. She
      then found the icon. The czar had the Assumption Convent for
      nuns built on the site.

      The icon remained in the convent until it was stolen in 1903 or
      1904. The image was one of the most venerated in Russia.
      Many copies of it exist.

      There are contradictory versions about the fate of the original.
      One account says it reappeared in Warsaw, where it was
      purchased by an English nobleman who then resold it. The icon
      passed through several hands before reappearing in the United
      States.

      There, a group of Catholics, who were perhaps ignorant of its
      origin, purchased it and gave it to the Fatima Shrine. Eventually, it
      was given to the Pope as a gift in 1993.

      Another version of the story now circulating in Russia says the
      icon was stolen in 1903 by a madman who burned it.

      * * *

      Evaluation of Holy See´s Charitable Works Over 30 Years
      By Pontifical Council "Cor Unum"

      VATICAN CITY, FEB. 5, 2002 (Zenit.org).- Just under $2 million
      was donated by people worldwide Dec. 14 in response to the
      Holy Father's appeal for a day of prayer and fasting.

      The figure was reported today by Archbishop Paul Joseph
      Cordes, president of the Pontifical Council "Cor Unum," the
      institution entrusted by John Paul II with the collection of those
      funds and its allocation to victims of terrorism and war.

      This was one of the Pontiff's responses to the Sept. 11 terrorist
      attacks and the aftermath.

      In evaluating the activity of the pontifical council, Archbishop
      Cordes revealed that "Cor Unum" during its 30 years has
      allocated $87.5 million in charitable papal gestures. The council,
      founded by Paul VI in 1971, also coordinates and fosters the
      assistance work of Catholic institutions worldwide.

      "Cor Unum" is "not a simple charitable institution," Archbishop
      Cordes said. "Our intention is not to be an emergency service.
      [...] All of us need something more than bread and a roof."

      "Cor Unum" published a book entitled "Ars Caritatis" which
      summarizes the council's activities, and includes addresses
      delivered by Paul VI and John Paul II to its plenary assemblies.

      The council also administers two foundations created by the
      current Pope.

      The John Paul II Foundation for the Sahel, created in 1984 to
      combat drought and desertification, financed 312 projects over
      the past year, amounting to a total of $2.99 million.

      The "Populorum Progressio" Foundation, created in 1992 to help
      the Indian, mestizo, Afro-American and peasant population of
      Latin America and the Caribbean, financed 215 projects over the
      past year, to the tune of $1.77 million.

      * * *

      Sizing Up Guatemala Amid Strife and Sects
      New President of Episcopal Conference Outlines Challenges

      GUATEMALA CITY, FEB. 4, 2002 (Zenit.org).- The invasion of
      fundamentalist sects over the past 40 years has given the
      Catholic Church in Guatemala renewed dynamism, asserts the
      new head of the bishops' conference.

      Metropolitan Archbishop Rodolfo Quezada Toruno, the new
      president of the Guatemalan episcopal conference, was asked
      by the newspaper Prensa Libre about the percentage of
      Catholics in the country.

      "There are many statistics, but we have no trustworthy
      information," he said. "I am not that interested in numbers; my
      concern is that the Church fulfill its mission." (Statistics say 85%
      to 95% of Guatemala's 12 million inhabitants are Catholic.)

      Known as a conciliator for his role in the peace process that
      ended the decades-long civil war, Archbishop Quezada
      announced that the Church would foster good relations with
      other Christian denominations in the country.

      "This is Pope John Paul II's wish; therefore, the doors of the
      Archdiocesan Palace are open to all," he said. "To promote
      ecumenism means to agree with those things that unite us, and
      not [focus] on those that divide us."

      "We still need to know one another better, and to eliminate
      religious fanaticism," the archbishop continued. "At this time, it is
      imperative that we unite, so that we can avoid unnecessary
      polarizations, as happens in other sectors."

      In regard to the peace process, the archbishop said that one
      must not forget its benefits, "because death and the exile of
      thousands of Guatemalans has stopped."

      "The causes of the war have not been eliminated, because it has
      not been possible to implement the peace agreements," he
      cautioned. "We insist that these begin, because they are a
      platform to reduce the gap between rich and poor, and to
      improve the living conditions of all."

      When Archbishop Quezada took office, the press said there
      would be changes in the archdiocese's Office of Human Rights,
      which had been run by Bishop Juan Gerardi before his murder.

      "I have reviewed all their activities, as well as the way funds are
      administered, and I am satisfied, so I will not make changes,"
      the archbishop said.

      Three military men and a priest were convicted and sentenced in
      the 1998 murder of Bishop Gerardi. With reference to the case,
      Archbishop Quezada said the episcopal conference "has always
      said it wants to know the truth, no matter what it is, and that it is
      against impunity."

      "We want justice to be done, and we want it in memory of Bishop
      Gerardi and in tribute to his struggle for human rights," he said.
      "Following serious studies, the archdiocese has decided to
      continue as a co-plaintiff, and we would like the second hearing
      to be carried out objectively, in keeping with the law, according to
      what has been done and proved in the trial, and without any
      pressure. The magistrates must analyze this case in total
      serenity."

      Archbishop Quezada said he has no plans to approach the
      political authorities. "Up to now, I have been dedicated to matters
      in my own house," he said. "However, this does not mean that I
      am not aware of the state of the country."

      He added: "Our democracy is very weak. This is why it is
      important that it be exercised with much clarity and that the
      elections of the new procurator of human rights, the magistrates,
      the procurator of the nation, and the attorney general, not be
      politicized."

      * * *

      More Education Urged on Use of Internet
      Archbishop John Foley Addresses Italian Catholic Journalists

      CAGLIARI, Sardinia, FEB. 5, 2002 (Zenit.org).- Internet is not a
      threat but an opportunity, yet more education is needed on the
      use of the media, says the president of the Pontifical Council for
      Social Communications.

      "Our educational systems have delayed for too long education in
      the media, they have postponed for too long the development of
      critical consumers of films, radio and television programs,
      publications," said Archbishop John P. Foley. "Now these
      systems find themselves behind in the development of critical
      users capable of discernment in the use of Internet."

      He made his comments while addressing a Feb. 1 congress
      organized here by the Sardinian section of the Italian Catholic
      Press Union.

      In his address entitled "Man on the Net," Archbishop Foley
      pointed out that in this year's message for World
      Communications Day, John Paul II focused on Internet,
      presenting it "as a new forum to proclaim the Gospel."

      Regard anti-Internet criticism, Archbishop Foley said: "There are
      too many voices that are opposed, too many people who
      condemn Internet, because some make an evil use of it. It would
      be like condemning the human race because we are all sinners
      and because many abuse their own freedom."

      He expressed the hope that, through a correct use of Internet, a
      "culture of dialogue, participation, solidarity and reconciliation"
      will spread. Moreover, the archbishop highlighted the
      extraordinary "opportunity to reach the world directly," which the
      Church has today thanks to Internet.

      "Missionaries can reach those who live in nations whose
      borders are closed to priests and religious," the archbishop
      continued.

      Speaking of the Holy See's presence on Internet, Archbishop
      Foley emphasized the need for the Vatican to have its own site
      which would guarantee the authenticity of the information.

      The confusion of identity is one of the problems to consider
      when it comes to discussing ethical values on Internet, he said.
      The archbishop pointed out specifically the importance of
      identifying data transmission in research and in detection of
      pederasts on Internet.

      * * *

      Ricardo J. Cardinal Vidal Celebrates 71st Birthday

      Ricardo J. Cardinal Vidal was born on February 6, 1931, in
      Mogpoc, diocese of Boac, Philippines. He completed his
      studies at the Minor Seminary of the Most Holy Rosary, (now Our
      Lady of Carmel) and San Carlo Seminary in Manila. He was
      ordained a priest on 17 March, 1956. He was appointed Bishop
      of the titular Church of Claterna and coadjutor Bishop of Melalos
      on 10 September, 1971 and ordained two months later on 30
      November. He was appointed Archbishop of Lipa on August 22,
      1973 where he remained until 1981. He was then appointed
      Coadjutor Archbishop of Cebu on 13 April , 1981. On 24 August,
      1982, he was appointed Archbishop of Cebu. John Paul II
      elevated him to the College of Cardinals during the Consistory of
      25 May, 1985 as a Cardinal-Priest of the titular church, Sts. Peter
      and Paul in Via Ostiensi. He helped found the Catechist
      Missionaries of St. Theresa, a religious order concerned with
      spiritual education. Curial membership: Evangelizaton of
      Peoples, Catholic Education (congregations); Health Care
      Workers, Family (counci).

      * * *

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      * * *

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      __________________________________________________
      © Copyright 2002 John N. Lupia for Roman Catholic News at the
      URL: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News,
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