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Volume 1, No. 61

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  • John N. Lupia
    ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS Volume 1, Issue 61 WEDNESDAY, 28 NOVEMBER, 2001 Thirty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time Feast of St. James Gangale of the Marches, OFM Today s
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 28, 2001
      ROMAN CATHOLIC NEWS

      Volume 1, Issue 61

      WEDNESDAY, 28 NOVEMBER, 2001

      Thirty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time

      Feast of St. James Gangale of the Marches, OFM

      Today's Lectionary Readings
      http://www.nccbuscc.org/nab/112801.htm

      * * *

      INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Holy See Address at Education Conference
      "A Key Factor in Fostering Tolerance Among Religious
      Communities"
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Anglican-Catholic Ecumenical Working Group Launched
      A 35-Year Dialogue Continues
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Weapons Alone Won´t Bring Peace to Afghanistan, Vatican Aide
      Says
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • ARCHBISHOP TAURAN MEETS WITH FORMER KING OF
      AFGHANISTAN
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Papal Condolences for Air-Crash Victims in Switzerland
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • HOLY SEE OBSERVER ON FREEDOM OF RELIGION OR
      BELIEF
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • AUDIENCES
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Catholic Media Group Picks Australian as First President
      Congress That Created Signis Concludes
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Israelis Honor Religious for Helping Jews During Holocaust
      Brother Stablum Saved 51 From the Nazis
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Church Keeps Microcredit Project Going in Bangladesh
      But Loans Aren´t Enough; Education Has a Role Too
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------

      * * *

      Holy See Address at Education Conference
      "A Key Factor in Fostering Tolerance Among Religious
      Communities"

      MADRID, Spain, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of an
      address Saturday by Archbishop Diarmuid Martin, head of a Holy
      See delegation at a conference on education relative to religious
      liberty. The conference ran Nov. 23-25.

      RELIGION PLAYS A CENTRAL ROLE IN THE LIVES OF
      MILLIONS

      1. The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of All
      Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination based on Religion or
      Belief notes that "religion or belief, for anyone who professes
      either, is one of the fundamental elements in his conception of
      life" (Preamble). The recent Durban World Conference against
      Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related
      Intolerance recalled how "religion, spirituality and belief play a
      central role in the lives of millions of women and men, and in the
      way they live and treat other persons" (Durban Declaration §6).

      This "International Consultative Conference on School Education
      in relation to Freedom of Religion or Belief, Tolerance and
      Non-Discrimination" comes at an opportune time. In an
      increasingly interdependent world, we feel the need urgently to
      rediscover the roots of what humankind has in common.
      Religious education is a powerful instrument to help believers
      intensify their efforts towards the realization of the unity of the one
      human family.

      School education is a key factor in fostering understanding and
      tolerance among religious communities. It must likewise be a
      key factor, in often increasingly pluralist or secularised societies,
      in fostering tolerance among all for religious expression and in
      ensuring religious freedom for all.

      EVERY RELIGION CAN BE A FERTILE GROUND FOR
      PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS

      2. The question of religious freedom was the object of a special
      Declaration of the Second Vatican Council. On the specific
      question of education, -- in language which is mirrored in both
      the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (§26,3) and in the
      Declaration on the Elimination of All Form of Intolerance and
      Discrimination based on Religion or Belief (§5) -- the Vatican
      Council's Declaration stresses that parents "have the right to
      decide in accordance with their own religious beliefs the form of
      religious education which is to be given to their children"(§5),
      and it adds, "parents should not be subjected directly or
      indirectly to unjust burdens because of this freedom of
      choice"(ibid.). Governments have the obligation to ensure that
      parents can attain full realisation of these fundamental rights.

      Religious freedom constitutes a fundamental human right and
      can certainly be considered one of the cornerstones of the
      edifice of human rights, because it touches such an intimate
      sphere of human existence and personal identity, the
      relationship between the person and the Transcendent.

      Every religion, just as every culture, is capable of fully fostering
      all human rights and indeed of providing the fertile ground in
      which respect for human rights and the respect for the dignity of
      all can take root. It is possible -- as can be seen, for example, in
      the practice of so many Catholic school systems, which now
      reach over 200,000 - for each religious tradition to educate its
      young members fully in the tenets of its own belief and at the
      same time create within them a spirit of openness to and
      respect for the religious traditions of others. Educational
      institutions established by a particular religious tradition can be
      open to and fully respectful of the rights of children of different
      religious traditions who attend them. This Conference could
      profitably initiate a process of sharing best practices in this
      regard.

      RELIGIOUS VALUES CONTRIBUTE TO THE ORGANIZATION
      AND INSPIRATION OF SOCIETY

      3. The Declaration of the Second Vatican Council notes that
      religious freedom also includes "the right of religious groups not
      to be prevented from freely demonstrating the special value of
      their teachings for the organization of society and the inspiration
      of human activity in general" (§4). Religious discourse, if
      presented within the framework of democratic debate, has the
      right to full citizenship in every society. To deny respect for such
      discourse would be to impose a limit on people to express their
      most deep-felt sentiments. Unfortunately, all too often, religion is
      superficially presented in contemporary society only in the
      context of division and intolerance, rather than its capacity to
      foster respect and unity.

      Obviously, religious freedom must be exercised in such a way
      that it fully respects the views and the religious traditions of
      others. Curricula for school-based religious education -- in both
      religious and public educational institutions -- should include
      programmes that foster a more accurate and a more sensitive
      knowledge and understanding of a broad range of religious
      traditions. Education to sensitive respect for the religious values
      of others belongs to the education of believers and
      non-believers alike. Much unhealthy and negative stereotyping of
      religious traditions springs from a lack of knowledge or from the
      lack of an open and sympathetic understanding of the tenets of
      another's religious traditions.

      Stringent efforts should be made by religious communities and
      their leaders to prevent religious factors from being used to
      exacerbate already existing historical, ethnic, social or political
      divisions. Fundamental religious values should rather be
      directed towards rejecting violence as a means of resolving
      disputes. Similarly, religious leaders should be attentive to reject
      false interpretations of religious tenets that offend human dignity
      or the unity of the human family. Religious-based school
      systems should ensure especially that girls have full access to
      education.

      A FUTURE OF DIALOGUE, UNDERSTANDING AND RESPECT

      4. Where mutual respect develops among religious groups, it
      becomes possible for all to work more effectively for the
      common good, without anyone renouncing his or her deep-felt
      convictions. It becomes possible to address tensions that may
      have arisen in the past. It becomes possible to re-read history
      together, in order to reach a better understanding of the hurts
      that individual religious communities may have caused or have
      suffered. This is a theme that has been particularly developed by
      Pope John Paul II, for example, at a special ceremony of
      repentance that was held during the Jubilee Year of 2000 or
      during his visit to significant centres of worship of other
      confessions and religions.

      Honestly addressing the tensions of the past generates a strong
      force for the construction of a different future and for the
      beginnings of a process of reconciliation and healing. The
      formation of future teachers should pay special attention to their
      ability to sensitively address divisive historical issues. Where
      necessary, school textbooks and curricula should be revised to
      remove harmful or unbalanced presentations of other religious
      traditions and historical events.

      The task of fostering inter-religious dialogue belongs in the first
      place to religious leaders themselves. Such dialogue should be
      extended to include the widest possible sector of each religious
      community, with special attention being given to young persons.
      All educational establishments can and should be open to such
      respectful dialogue, which respects the specific values of the
      religious traditions of each individual and opens out to the
      values of others.

      It is to be hoped that this International Consultative Conference
      will be an important impetus worldwide to such a process of
      dialogue, understanding and respect.

      * * *

      Anglican-Catholic Ecumenical Working Group Launched
      A 35-Year Dialogue Continues

      VATICAN CITY, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- Ecumenical dialogue
      took another step forward when John Paul II gave his backing to
      the new Anglican-Roman Catholic Working Group, which held its
      inaugural meeting in Rome last weekend.

      Before going to Rome, the group's members, bishops of the two
      Christian confessions, met in London with Anglican Archbishop
      George Carey of Canterbury.

      When John Paul II received the participants in this new initiative
      on Saturday, he referred to "the many genuine advances of
      ecumenism in recent years, of which the new group gives
      evidence."

      The Pontiff recalled that the first such working group began in
      1966, at the initiative of Paul VI and Anglican Archbishop Michael
      Ramsey, and resulted in the establishment of the Anglican and
      Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC).

      Following his visit to Canterbury in 1982, John Paul II and
      Anglican Archbishop Robert Runcie established a second
      ARCIC.

      The third ecumenical step was taken in 1996, when the Pope
      and the present Archbishop of Canterbury published a Joint
      Declaration, inviting Catholics and Anglicans "to repent of the
      past, to pray for the grace of unity, and to open themselves to
      God's transforming power."

      In May 2000, a decisive meeting of Anglican and Catholic
      Bishops took place in Mississauga, Ontario, when it was
      decided to create the new ecumenical working group. It was that
      group that came into being this past weekend.

      The Pope told the bishops that they "are especially well qualified
      to consider the next practical steps that might be taken, not only
      to consolidate the gains already made, but also to lead us to
      new depths of communion on the way to that fullness of unity
      that is the will of Christ."

      "It is clear that disunity has impaired our mission in the world,"
      the Holy Father said. "In these troubled times, the world needs
      more than ever the common witness of Christians in every area,
      from the defense of human life and dignity to the promotion of
      justice and peace."

      "When discouragement threatens or new difficulties arise, we
      need to focus once more upon the Spirit's power to do what
      seems to us impossible," he added. "At times of apparent
      pause, we must wait for the Holy Spirit to do what we ourselves
      cannot do."

      Last January, the names of the members of the new working
      group were published. The team will work under the
      chairmanship of Bishop David Beetge, Anglican bishop of the
      Highveld, South Africa; and Catholic Archbishop John Bathersby
      of Brisbane, Australia.

      The other Catholic members are Archbishop Alexander Brunett
      of Seattle, Washington; Bishop Anthony Farquhar of the Down
      and Connor Diocese of Ireland; Bishop Crispian Hollis of
      Portsmouth, England; Bishop Lucius Ugorji of Umuahia, Nigeria;
      and Father Peter Cross of Melbourne, Australia.

      Monsignor Timothy Galligan of the Pontifical Council for
      Promoting Christian Unity is Catholic co-secretary.

      The other Anglican members are Archbishop Peter Carnley of
      Perth, primate of the Anglican Church of Australia; Bishop Edwin
      Gulick of Kentucky; Archbishop Peter Kwong, primate of Hong
      Kong; Bishop Michael Nazir-Ali of Rochester, England; and Dr.
      Mary Tanner of England.

      The Anglican co-secretary is Canon David Hamid of the Anglican
      Communion Office in London.

      * * *

      Weapons Alone Won´t Bring Peace to Afghanistan, Vatican Aide Says

      VATICAN CITY, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- A top Vatican aide and
      an exiled Afghan king agreed that weapons alone cannot bring
      peace and security to Afghanistan.

      Archbishop Jean-Louis Tauran, Vatican secretary for relations
      with states, and King Mohammed Zaher Shah met Monday in the
      well-guarded Roman residence of the 87-year-old monarch.

      Archbishop Tauran was accompanied by Archbishop Paolo
      Romeo, apostolic nuncio in Italy. The meeting was also attended
      by Mir Wais, son of the former monarch, and General Abdul Wali,
      a principal adviser and relative of Zaher Shah.

      Vatican spokesman Joaquín Navarro-Valls said that the visit, on
      the eve of the Bonn conference to debate Afghanistan's future,
      served to "renew the Holy Father's concern and the Vatican's
      commitment to peace and the well-being of the Afghan people."

      Navarro-Valls revealed that, during the meeting, "there was talk
      on the need for a negotiated peace and for international
      solidarity to reconstruct the country, convinced that weapons
      alone cannot bring peace and security."

      "The sovereign also expressed heartfelt gratitude for the Pope's
      concern and that of Catholic humanitarian organizations," the
      Vatican spokesman's press statement concludes.

      * * *

      ARCHBISHOP TAURAN MEETS WITH FORMER KING OF AFGHANISTAN

      VATICAN CITY, NOV 27, 2001 (VIS) - Holy See Press Office
      Director Joaquin Navarro-Valls, released the following
      declaration late yesterday afternoon:

      "I can confirm that this afternoon Archbishop Jean-Louis Tauran,
      secretary for Relations with States, accompanied by Archbishop
      Paolo Romeo, apostolic nuncio in Italy, met with former King of
      Afghanistan Zaher Shah, in his Roman residence.

      "The meeting permitted Archbishop Tauran to renew the Holy
      Father's solicitude and the Holy See's willingness to help in favor
      of peace and the well-being of the Afghan people.

      "They discussed the necessity of a negotiated peace and
      international solidarity for the rebuilding of the country, convinced
      that arms, by themselves, cannot bring peace and security.

      "The sovereign also expressed words of heartfelt gratitude for
      the solicitude of the Pope and the Catholic humanitarian
      organizations."

      * * *

      Papal Condolences for Air-Crash Victims in Switzerland

      VATICAN CITY, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- In a telegram of
      condolence, John Paul II expressed his sympathy for the victims
      of the weekend air accident near Zurich.

      A Crossair Jumbolino Avro RJ-100 coming from Berlin crashed
      as it tried to land Saturday, killing 24.

      The message, signed by Cardinal Angelo Sodano, Vatican
      secretary of state, and addressed to Bishop Amede Grab of
      Chur, states: "Overwhelmed by the dimensions of the accident,
      His Holiness prays to God, Lord of life and death, for the victims
      and implores eternal life for them."

      In the telegram, written in German, John Paul II says he is "close
      to the relatives who weep for a loved one and prays that they will
      receive Christian consolation to overcome dark hours and days."

      * * *

      HOLY SEE OBSERVER ON FREEDOM OF RELIGION OR BELIEF

      VATICAN CITY, NOV 27, 2001 (VIS) - Made public today was the
       speech given on November 24 by Archbishop Diarmuid Martin,
      Holy See permanent observer to the United Nations Office and
      Other International Organizations in Geneva, and head of the
      Holy See delegation to the International Consultative Conference
      on School Education in relation to Freedom of Religion or Belief,
      Tolerance and Non-Discrimination. The conference was held in
      Madrid from November 23 to 25.

      Archbishop Martin focussed his talk on educating young people
      in their faith and in respect for the faith of others. Noting that
      religion plays a central role in the lives of millions, he said that
      "religious education is a powerful instrument to help believers
      intensify their efforts towards the realization of the unity of the one
      human family, ... and a key factor in fostering understanding and
      tolerance among religious communities."

      Religious freedom," the archbishop affirmed, "constitutes a
      fundamental human right and can certainly be considered one of
      the cornerstones of the edifice of human rights, because it
      touches such an intimate sphere of human existence and
      personal identity, the relationship between the person and the
      Transcendent." This freedom, he added, also includes "the right
      of religious groups not to be prevented from freely demonstrating
      the special value of their teachings for the organization of society
      and the inspiration of human activity in general."

      "Honestly addressing the tensions of the past," Archbishop
      Martin concluded, "generates a strong force for the construction
      of a different future and for the beginnings of a process of
      reconciliation and healing. The formation of future teachers
      should pay special attention to their ability to sensitively address
      divisive historical issues. Where necessary, school textbooks
      and curricula should be revised to remove harmful or
      unbalanced presentations of other religious traditions and
      historical events."

      * * *

      AUDIENCES

      VATICAN CITY, NOV 27, 2001 (VIS) - The Holy Father received
      today in separate audiences two prelates of the Episcopal
      Conference of Costa Rica, on the occasion of their "ad limina"
      visit:

      Bishop Jose Rafael Barquero Arce of Alajuela.
      Bishop Hector Morera Vega of Tilaran.

      * * *

      Catholic Media Group Picks Australian as First President
      Congress That Created Signis Concludes

      ROME, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- Australian Sacred Heart
      missionary Peter Malone is the first president of Signis, the
      organization that combines OCIC and Unda, the Catholic film,
      radio and television associations.

      Malone, a specialist in film arts, had been president of OCIC
      since 1998. He was elected Signis' president during the world
      congress that gave birth to this organization. The congress
      ended today.

      The new vice presidents, elected by the 500 participants in the
      meeting, are Asian and European: Augustine Loorthusamy,
      professor of media communications in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;
      and Gaye Williams Ortiz, associate professor at Ripon and York
      University College, and BBC radio and television program
      producer and presenter.

      Among other things, the congress helped to appreciate the
      difficult challenge that faces all communicators today who wish
      to evangelize through the media, as Father Pierre Belanger
      revealed on Vatican Radio. Until today, Father Belanger was
      secretary-general of Unda.

      "In very many realms, to engage in religious communication is
      certainly not an easy undertaking from the financial point of view,"
      he said.

      "The support of the economic community is often not very great,"
      he added. "There are many areas in the world, including in the
      West itself, in which commercial, governmental and
      para-governmental organizations do not want to have too direct
      or too evident relations with organizations that are officially linked
      to a specific religious confession."

      Given the situation, Father Belanger disclosed that Catholic
      communications organizations decided to dedicate "particular
      attention to formation, especially in developing countries."

      "In our organizations, interest in formation has existed for a long
      time," he added, "But in recent years there has been an
      accentuation: We have realized the importance of reinforcing the
      professional character of our personnel to support them in their
      insertion in the work environment, thanks to the quality of their
      work."

      "One third of the projects we have, for example, with the
      Congregations for the Evangelization of Peoples, in Africa, Asia
      and the Pacific, have the dimension of formation for our
      members," Father Belanger revealed.

      * * *

      Israelis Honor Religious for Helping Jews During Holocaust
      Brother Stablum Saved 51 From the Nazis

      ROME, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- A religious was
      posthumously awarded the people of Israel's highest
      recognition who having helped save Jews during the Holocaust.

      Brother Emanuele Stablum (1895-1950) of the Congregation of
      the Sons of the Immaculate Conception was awarded the
      "Righteous Among the Nations" medal last week.

      During World War II, Brother Stablum saved 51 Jews from Nazi
      violence in Rome, by hiding them, with the help of his brothers in
      religion, in the corridors of hospitals run by his religious
      congregation.

      To avoid German suspicion, the refugees were registered in the
      hospital as patients with skin diseases. The hospital was, and
      continues to be, the most prestigious dermatology center in
      Rome.

      On more than one occasion, the religious applied creams to the
      Jews, so that the Nazis would think they were genuine patients.

      The ceremony to confer the medal was held in the very same
      hospital, known as the Dermatological Institute of the
      Immaculate in Rome.

      Father Giovanni Cazzaniga, postulator general of the cause of
      beatification of the congregation's religious, and firsthand
      witness of the heroic work of Brother Stablum, revealed: "Despite
      the fact that everything was complicated at that time, Emanuele
      Stablum did not hesitate in face of the dramatic emergency, and
      opened the hospital's doors to anyone who knocked."

      According to Father Cazzaniga, the doctor and religious not only
      saved persecuted Jews, but also politicians sought by the
      police. Brother Stablum made no distinctions of "faith, age,
      social condition, and asked for nothing in return."

      The historian said that Brother Stablum "welcomed the Vatican's
      appeal to help the Jews." Although strengthened and supported
      by his religious community, "in the end the decision was his to
      accept the marginalized and desperate Jews."

      "He made the decision, conscious of the fact that he risked his
      life; what is more, from that moment he tied his life to the life of
      those he helped. Had the Nazis discovered him, he would have
      been sent to a death camp in Germany," Father Cazzaniga
      affirmed.

      Stablum "also opened the chapel to Jewish refugees," the priest
      explained. The religious invoked God the Father, as Jesus
      revealed, while the Jews, "as elder brothers, prayed to the God of
      the Old Covenant, present in the Psalms," he said.

      Tibor Schlosser, adviser of the Israeli Embassy in Italy,
      explained that one of the principal tasks of the Yad Vashem
      Institute, which confers the recognition of the Jewish people, is
      not to forget anyone who helped the Jews during the war.

      "Every one of the hundreds of thousands of Jewish survivors has
      an 'angel' like Brother Stablum," he said.

      * * *

      Church Keeps Microcredit Project Going in Bangladesh
      But Loans Aren´t Enough; Education Has a Role Too

      DHAKA, Bangladesh, NOV. 27, 2001 (Zenit.org).- The Catholic
      Church in Bangladesh has kept afloat a microcredit project for
      the indigenous populations.

      Since 1996, Father Giulio Berutti, missionary of the Pontifical
      Institute for Foreign Missions (PIME), has coordinated the credit
      unions, or microcredit cooperatives, in the Diocese of Dinajpur.

      "Our indigenous peoples live in a subsistence economy; they do
      not think of the morrow; when they are in need, they acquire a
      sack of rice from usurers and remain enslaved for life," the priest
      told the Italian newspaper Avvenire. "This impedes the formation
      of capital and development."

      Because of this, missionaries in the past, and the local
      churches today, formed credit unions for the local peoples. In
      every mission there is a credit union commission, presided over
      by the parish priest and made up of a representative from each
      Christian village.

      The credit cooperative aims to encourage savings and place
      them at the disposal of others when necessary. Loans must be
      repaid -- something unknown in the tribal culture of Bangladesh,
      one of the world's poorest countries.

      So solidarity among the poor takes on a new dimension and
      serves to foster development. Having to save 8 to 10 takas (20
      cents) every week to pay back a loan is an important cultural
      leap.

      The project was launched in this diocese in 1997 when Mani
      Tese (Open Hands), an Italian Christian nongovernmental
      organization, decided to finance the salary of employees who
      meet with villagers to learn their needs.

      Father Berutti meets every month with these agents to study the
      problems.

      "In seven or eight years we have accumulated a social capital of
      $113,000, a notable figure in Bangladesh," he told Avvenire.
      "Open Hands' initial investment has given fruit and the
      cooperative continues to expand; there are always new villages
      that want to join us."

      "Our credit unions are not self-sufficient yet, because we do not
      charge interest rates of 25-30% as the banks do -- usurers,
      100% -- but only 10-12%," the priest explained. "Moreover, at the
      end of the year, we distribute the earnings among those who
      have deposits."

      "In total, there are 20 full-time employees and the credit unions
      will be self-sufficient when we have enough deposits to pay the
      employees," he added.

      The missionary acknowledged that the initiative would not have
      lasted without the help of Open Hands, which will pay
      employees' salaries for at least the first five years.

      A total of 259 villages, with 8,707 associated families, participate
      in the Dinajpur Diocese credit unions. It's a start in a nation of
      131 million people who live into an area smaller than the state of
      Wisconsin.

      "The secret of success is in education -- courses, meetings,
      discussions, diocesan meetings are constantly held -- and in
      control and supervision," Father Berutti said.

      "The habit of spending is strong: vital necessities, pressures
      from the family, parents, and friends is often irresistible," he
      concluded. "If a local is left alone, in no time he returns to his
      former way, spends it all, and remains with nothing. The
      mentality and customs must be changed. The work for
      development is long term, because it is based on education."

      * * *

      CHANTED ROSARY ONLINE
      http://www.monksofadoration.org/rosarych.html

      DOWNLOAD FREE SCRIPTURAL ROSARY
      http://www.virtualrosary.org/

      * * *

      DIVINE OFFICE ONLINE

      For the Divine Office texts online:
      http://www.liturgyhours.org

      For the Divine Office audio recording recited by the Monks of
      Adoration:
      http://www.monksofadoration.org/audiolit.html

      * * *

      Call or write today regarding favors granted through the
      intercession of Dolores Immaculate "Mama" Gili or for more
      information about the cause of her investigation for canonization
      to:

      Rev. Dante DiGirolamo
      (973) 412-1170

      Rev. Dante DiGirolamo
      P. O. Box 455
      Kearny, New Jersey 07032

      Volume 1, Issue 14 C
      Cause of Mama Gili as Servant of God (Part 1)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/33

      Volume 1, No. 16
      Cause of Mama Gili as Servant of God (Part 2)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/37

      Volume 1, No. 29
      Need a Miracle?
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Roman-Catholic-News/message/55

      * * *

      EUCHARISTIC PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE SORROWFUL
      HEART OF MARY

      When the Eucharistic host is elevated at Mass say:

      "Eternal Father, through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of
      Mary, I offer you the crucified Body of Your dearly beloved Son,
      Jesus Christ, in reparation for all the sins committed against you
      and for the conversion and salvation of the whole world."

      When the Eucharistic chalice is elevated at Mass say:

      "Eternal Father, through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of
      Mary, I offer you the precious Blood of Your dearly beloved Son,
      Jesus Christ, in reparation for all the sins committed against you
      and for the conversion and salvation of the whole world."

      * * *

      PLEASE SUPPORT EWTN

      Send donations to:

      Mother Angelica
      EWTN
      5817 OLD LEEDS ROAD
      IRONDALE, AL 35210

      https://www.ewtn.com/ewtn/ssl/donation/donation_ewtn.asp

      * * *
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------

      WEAR THE BROWN SCAPULAR OF OUR LADY OF MOUNT
      CARMEL AND PRAY THE ROSARY DAILY FOR THE
      CONVERSION OF THE WHOLE WORLD AND FOR CHURCH
      UNITY
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------

      "during this important time, as the eve of the new millennium
      approaches unity among all Christians of the various
      confessions will increase until they reach full communion." John
      Paul II, Tertio Millennio Adveniente, 16

      "Keep close to the Mother of God as if you were the child Jesus
      clinging to her robes while walking down a dusty and busy
      crowded street and you'll always be safe."
      __________________________________________________
      © Copyright 2001 John N. Lupia for Roman Catholic News at the
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