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Re: Typical Rate of Speed on the Track

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  • bitchesbruze
    I think we can simplify the distance around the track because WFTDA has. For all measurements of play, the track is 160 (there are sixteen 10 marks). With
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2009
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      I think we can simplify the distance around the track because WFTDA has. For all measurements of play, the track is 160' (there are sixteen 10' marks). With 5280 feet in a mile, 33 laps of the track = 1 mile.

      Pack speed varies. It has to. In the last jam of regular play for RMRG vs Philly, the pack is going 5.43 laps per minute which equates to 9.872mph.

      DeRanged travels 7.125 laps per minute in that jam which is 12.95mph.

      The overtime jam is slower.

      You were there, but for those who weren't:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY3BOAE1lPU

      I haven't calculated it, but I'm sure WFTDA has these stats. I suspect the average pack speed at Eastern Regionals was somewhere around 3.5 laps per minute or 6.36mph. That's average. That means some times they weren't moving at all and some times they were going much faster.

      Speed is also relative to direction. I can be moving at 5mph on a radius of the corner but I'd be making 0mph around the track while knocking someone on her a** in the corner.

      Personally, I find the slow/stopped/clockwise play fascinating. I think people don't like it because it can be very confusing. As the sport grows and fans learn the techniques, they'll learn to appreciate the brilliance of slow/stopped/clockwise play. Check out this primer I did and tell me you don't find the second time you see the play much more interesting:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JPPD9PmK1U

      Keep in mind, the rules only prohibit clockwise SKATING to block. There are no rules restricting the direction of stepping.

      Bitches Bruze
      #802 Western Mass Destruction
      Pioneer Valley Roller Derby

      --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "bustaarmov" <bustaarmov@...> wrote:
      >
      > From the WFTDA site:
      > Track Circumference:
      > Inside = 148.5' Outside = 236.5'
      >
      > The WFTDA flat track has a mean circumference around 192.5 feet (58.5 meters). On that shorter length, the top speeds are hard to achieve, and harder to maintain. To skate at 22mph (33 feet per second, or 10 seconds in the 100 meter or so), a skater would have to turn a 5.8 second lap, or thereabouts. 20mph is 6.4 seconds. The mean is a decent measure, as skaters take the turn tight, and go wide on the exit.
      >
      > --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "Bill, but my friends call me Bob" <bills@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > As a point of reference, most women quad speed skaters do 100 meters oval in 10-11 seconds. The fastest guys will do it around 9 plus a little bit. I know Rice, OJ, and Trouble were certainly in that 10-11 second bracket when they had open floor in front of them.
      > > BillS
      > > --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "Philar" <philar_72@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I have heard that skaters can go a little faster than 20 mph on the track. So if half that rate of speed is 10 mph, that would be around 15 feet per second. If that is a fairly average speed for blockers in a pack, and please inform me if it is slow or fast, then if you half that rate of speed to 5 mph, or around 8 feet per second, could that possibly reasonable minimum speed on the track if somebody was to write a rule about it. That would mean at that rate of speed it would take 2 1/2 seconds to cover a 20 foot section of track. To my thinking that is fairly slow and could easily be set a the slowest leagal speed.
      > > >
      > > > Anyway, I heard some folks talking about setting a minimum rate of speed to do away with stroller derby.
      > > >
      > > > Phil
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Hard Ass Brass
      Actually the 10 ft marks are only at 10 ft on the straightaways, on the apexes (curves) they are 7 6 on the inside as per track layout appendix B.
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Actually the 10 ft marks are only at 10 ft on the straightaways, on the apexes (curves) they are 7'6" on the inside as per track layout appendix B.

        --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "bitchesbruze" <bbruze@...> wrote:
        >
        > I think we can simplify the distance around the track because WFTDA has. For all measurements of play, the track is 160' (there are sixteen 10' marks). With 5280 feet in a mile, 33 laps of the track = 1 mile.
        >
        > Pack speed varies. It has to. In the last jam of regular play for RMRG vs Philly, the pack is going 5.43 laps per minute which equates to 9.872mph.
        >
        > DeRanged travels 7.125 laps per minute in that jam which is 12.95mph.
        >
        > The overtime jam is slower.
        >
        > You were there, but for those who weren't:
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY3BOAE1lPU
        >
        > I haven't calculated it, but I'm sure WFTDA has these stats. I suspect the average pack speed at Eastern Regionals was somewhere around 3.5 laps per minute or 6.36mph. That's average. That means some times they weren't moving at all and some times they were going much faster.
        >
        > Speed is also relative to direction. I can be moving at 5mph on a radius of the corner but I'd be making 0mph around the track while knocking someone on her a** in the corner.
        >
        > Personally, I find the slow/stopped/clockwise play fascinating. I think people don't like it because it can be very confusing. As the sport grows and fans learn the techniques, they'll learn to appreciate the brilliance of slow/stopped/clockwise play. Check out this primer I did and tell me you don't find the second time you see the play much more interesting:
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JPPD9PmK1U
        >
        > Keep in mind, the rules only prohibit clockwise SKATING to block. There are no rules restricting the direction of stepping.
        >
        > Bitches Bruze
        > #802 Western Mass Destruction
        > Pioneer Valley Roller Derby
        >
        > --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "bustaarmov" <bustaarmov@> wrote:
        > >
        > > From the WFTDA site:
        > > Track Circumference:
        > > Inside = 148.5' Outside = 236.5'
        > >
        > > The WFTDA flat track has a mean circumference around 192.5 feet (58.5 meters). On that shorter length, the top speeds are hard to achieve, and harder to maintain. To skate at 22mph (33 feet per second, or 10 seconds in the 100 meter or so), a skater would have to turn a 5.8 second lap, or thereabouts. 20mph is 6.4 seconds. The mean is a decent measure, as skaters take the turn tight, and go wide on the exit.
        > >
        > > --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "Bill, but my friends call me Bob" <bills@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > As a point of reference, most women quad speed skaters do 100 meters oval in 10-11 seconds. The fastest guys will do it around 9 plus a little bit. I know Rice, OJ, and Trouble were certainly in that 10-11 second bracket when they had open floor in front of them.
        > > > BillS
        > > > --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "Philar" <philar_72@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I have heard that skaters can go a little faster than 20 mph on the track. So if half that rate of speed is 10 mph, that would be around 15 feet per second. If that is a fairly average speed for blockers in a pack, and please inform me if it is slow or fast, then if you half that rate of speed to 5 mph, or around 8 feet per second, could that possibly reasonable minimum speed on the track if somebody was to write a rule about it. That would mean at that rate of speed it would take 2 1/2 seconds to cover a 20 foot section of track. To my thinking that is fairly slow and could easily be set a the slowest leagal speed.
        > > > >
        > > > > Anyway, I heard some folks talking about setting a minimum rate of speed to do away with stroller derby.
        > > > >
        > > > > Phil
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Philar
        My basic thinking was that 20 mph was jammer speed, mach jammer speed (very fast) at that. That half of jammer speed was pack speed or around 10 mph. That a
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 1, 2009
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          My basic thinking was that 20 mph was jammer speed, mach jammer speed (very fast) at that. That half of jammer speed was pack speed or around 10 mph. That a 5 mph speed, covering a 20 foot section in 2.5 seconds would be a slow pack speed.

          As you might guess, I do not find stopping on the track, or even nearly stopping on the track to be enthralling strategy. If this becomes a typical practice by leagues and the WFTDA, I will quit traveling to see and report on roller derby. I do not find it nearly as interesting and exciting as a fast skated, defensive game. Every once in a while I'll see a bout like this (fast packs) and think, "This is the way roller derby should be skated!"

          When I saw the Denver Roller Dolls applying their strategy (actual stopping and blocking, or just stopping on the track) at the national tournament, I was booing along with the majority of fans, of whom many were skaters.

          My guess is the rules will be changed to stop at least some aspects of stroller derby, much as destroying the packs were addressed in 4.0. I am still amazed that refs would not call stopping on the track while positional blocking as blocking while at a standstill. My understanding is the refs tried to tighten up on the clockwise blocking (packs and skaters normally skate counter clockwise) in Philadelphia, but unfortunately I saw several missed calls where clockwise blocking was occurring and gaining a major advantage in my opinion.

          I must say that there are always people looking for loopholes in derby rules, and I think there were some who found this loophole for what I consider something contrary to the spirit of roller derby. I have a tendency to look at the banked track tradition of skating forward, and even the historic flat track tendency of skating forward or counter-clockwise. I just don't think that a)blocking was meant to come to a standstill, or near standstill, and b)that skaters were meant to skate clockwise. But I knew as early as May this might be an undesirable situation with major implication on interleague bouts; and tried to address the situations by either inquiring of the WFTDA rules online, or by addressing subjects like blocking while stopping or skating clockwise in this forum.

          I can understand skaters skating clockwise in a few situations, but not in all but three exceptions. Again, I am fairly hopeful that these situations will be addressed in the next rules production.

          Phil


          --- In RollerDerbyIsSport@yahoogroups.com, "bitchesbruze" <bbruze@...> wrote:
          >
          > I think we can simplify the distance around the track because WFTDA has. For all measurements of play, the track is 160' (there are sixteen 10' marks). With 5280 feet in a mile, 33 laps of the track = 1 mile.
          >
          > Pack speed varies. It has to. In the last jam of regular play for RMRG vs Philly, the pack is going 5.43 laps per minute which equates to 9.872mph.
          >
          > DeRanged travels 7.125 laps per minute in that jam which is 12.95mph.
          >
          > The overtime jam is slower.
          >
          > You were there, but for those who weren't:
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY3BOAE1lPU
          >
          > I haven't calculated it, but I'm sure WFTDA has these stats. I suspect the average pack speed at Eastern Regionals was somewhere around 3.5 laps per minute or 6.36mph. That's average. That means some times they weren't moving at all and some times they were going much faster.
          >
          > Speed is also relative to direction. I can be moving at 5mph on a radius of the corner but I'd be making 0mph around the track while knocking someone on her a** in the corner.
          >
          > Personally, I find the slow/stopped/clockwise play fascinating. I think people don't like it because it can be very confusing. As the sport grows and fans learn the techniques, they'll learn to appreciate the brilliance of slow/stopped/clockwise play. Check out this primer I did and tell me you don't find the second time you see the play much more interesting:
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JPPD9PmK1U
          >
          > Keep in mind, the rules only prohibit clockwise SKATING to block. There are no rules restricting the direction of stepping.
          >
          > Bitches Bruze
          > #802 Western Mass Destruction
          > Pioneer Valley Roller Derby
          >
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