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RE: One more mystery of the Robomower unlocked

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  • douglsmith1
    RJ12 connectors were often used in analog office phone systems. Sometimes you can find surplus cables, connectors, and tools through places that deal in that
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 8, 2013
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      RJ12 connectors were often used in analog office phone systems. Sometimes you can find surplus cables, connectors, and tools through places that deal in that kind of used equipment. 



      --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, <robomower@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Since Yahoo changed the format of the groups and in my opinion, really messed it up, I'm not sure if this is a post to the group until it shows up.

      As some of you may know, I've had an ongoing sad saga of getting my RL 1000 back up and running.   The controller/charging board was bad for one thing with corrosion and one pin eaten away.   Similar corrosion on the plug going to the manual controller.

      Step one was getting a cleaner/lubricate from Radio Shack which did remove the green corrosion.  Step two, replace the controller/charging board.  Next, 20-pin ribbon cable.  Now, I'm thinking the modular style plug which had corrosion and needs to be replaced.

      It took some investigating to figure out what this plug was.   It is indeed termed a modular-style plug originally used for telephones.  It's the same size as most telephone plugs which are often termed RJ11 plugs.  This means it has six slots or tracks but only four pins.

      However, it uses six of the slots and is termed an RJ12 or an 6P6C plug. This means it is the same size, same number of slots but six pins rather than the four.   I bought an RJ11 crimper tool at Lowes which will crimp RJ11 but not RJ12.

      If in fact it is simply a bad plug, that's a big savings over buying a new controller.   RJ12 crimpers are about 20 bucks up, but I will check with local computer repair shops to see if they can crimp it for me to save time.
    • Robert Silva
      I have a used RL500 that came with an extra (looks new) controller. This new controller constantly squeals as long as there s a battery present. Other
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 8, 2013
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        I have a used RL500 that came with an extra (looks new) controller. This new controller constantly squeals as long as there's a battery present. Other controller sounds do come through but they are muffled compared to the squeal. Turing off sounds in settings does not work. Any ideas?

        – Bob

        On Sep 8, 2013, at 8:23 AM, <Doug@...> wrote:

         

        RJ12 connectors were often used in analog office phone systems. Sometimes you can find surplus cables, connectors, and tools through places that deal in that kind of used equipment. 



        --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, <robomower@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        Since Yahoo changed the format of the groups and in my opinion, really messed it up, I'm not sure if this is a post to the group until it shows up.

        As some of you may know, I've had an ongoing sad saga of getting my RL 1000 back up and running.   The controller/charging board was bad for one thing with corrosion and one pin eaten away.   Similar corrosion on the plug going to the manual controller.

        Step one was getting a cleaner/lubricate from Radio Shack which did remove the green corrosion.  Step two, replace the controller/charging board.  Next, 20-pin ribbon cable.  Now, I'm thinking the modular style plug which had corrosion and needs to be replaced.

        It took some investigating to figure out what this plug was.   It is indeed termed a modular-style plug originally used for telephones.  It's the same size as most telephone plugs which are often termed RJ11 plugs.  This means it has six slots or tracks but only four pins.

        However, it uses six of the slots and is termed an RJ12 or an 6P6C plug. This means it is the same size, same number of slots but six pins rather than the four.   I bought an RJ11 crimper tool at Lowes which will crimp RJ11 but not RJ12.

        If in fact it is simply a bad plug, that's a big savings over buying a new controller.   RJ12 crimpers are about 20 bucks up, but I will check with local computer repair shops to see if they can crimp it for me to save time.

      • rann_georgia
        I ll check on that lead. Thanks. I think these things are very water resistance but humity not so much on the controller side of the unit. Or, who knows what
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 8, 2013
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          I'll check on that lead.  Thanks.   I think these things are very water resistance but humity not so much on the controller side of the unit.  Or, who knows what made that plug corrode?  Voltage likely plus maybe moisture.


          I did find online sources that sell RJ12 plugs for about a dollar.  BTW, RJ stands for registered jack.  The pliers, from one online place was around 20 bucks.  I'd only use them once.    The 6 pin will fit in the 8 pin slot of the RJ11 crimpers I bought but I think the way it crimps isn't designed to accept this style plug as now it's stuck.


          But, it's been an interesting summer of discovery of how these little creatures work or don't work.



          --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, <robomower@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          RJ12 connectors were often used in analog office phone systems. Sometimes you can find surplus cables, connectors, and tools through places that deal in that kind of used equipment. 



          --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, <robomower@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          Since Yahoo changed the format of the groups and in my opinion, really messed it up, I'm not sure if this is a post to the group until it shows up.

          As some of you may know, I've had an ongoing sad saga of getting my RL 1000 back up and running.   The controller/charging board was bad for one thing with corrosion and one pin eaten away.   Similar corrosion on the plug going to the manual controller.

          Step one was getting a cleaner/lubricate from Radio Shack which did remove the green corrosion.  Step two, replace the controller/charging board.  Next, 20-pin ribbon cable.  Now, I'm thinking the modular style plug which had corrosion and needs to be replaced.

          It took some investigating to figure out what this plug was.   It is indeed termed a modular-style plug originally used for telephones.  It's the same size as most telephone plugs which are often termed RJ11 plugs.  This means it has six slots or tracks but only four pins.

          However, it uses six of the slots and is termed an RJ12 or an 6P6C plug. This means it is the same size, same number of slots but six pins rather than the four.   I bought an RJ11 crimper tool at Lowes which will crimp RJ11 but not RJ12.

          If in fact it is simply a bad plug, that's a big savings over buying a new controller.   RJ12 crimpers are about 20 bucks up, but I will check with local computer repair shops to see if they can crimp it for me to save time.
        • rann_georgia
          If it came with two controllers, I m guessing whoever sold it to you knew one was bad or failing but kept the original one for parts, maybe. Does it work ok?
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 8, 2013
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            If it came with two controllers, I'm guessing whoever sold it to you knew one was bad or failing but kept the original one for parts, maybe.

            Does it work ok?    I've never heard mine do that.

            Here's just a guess on this one, could be a bad capacitor that's whistling.   You'll have to do a Google search for bad, counterfeit or fake capacitors and will find sites that describe this issue.   Sometimes counterfeit capacitors get put into a board and they cause problems.   The dialectic used in them is water based, they heat up and whistle, pop and sometimes explode.

            My controller has small screws in it.  I assume it's possible to take it apart.  If you see bulging electronic components in it, blown-out from the top capacitors (these are larger and usually about the size and shape of a cigarette butt but vary in color), burned areas on the circuit board, you've found your problem.  If the circuit board is burned, it's likely now landfill.  A bad capacitor can be replaced, though.

            However, since I've went through this corrosion issue on mine, I suggest trying the simple things first.   That would be removing the plug from the connector and inspecting it for damage.

            If it's working ok, I think about your only recourse would be to keep using until it fails.   I doubt that it has moisture inside it, but hard to say?


            --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, <robomower@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            I have a used RL500 that came with an extra (looks new) controller. This new controller constantly squeals as long as there's a battery present. Other controller sounds do come through but they are muffled compared to the squeal. Turing off sounds in settings does not work. Any ideas?

            – Bob

            On Sep 8, 2013, at 8:23 AM, <Doug@...> wrote:

             

            RJ12 connectors were often used in analog office phone systems. Sometimes you can find surplus cables, connectors, and tools through places that deal in that kind of used equipment. 



            --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, <robomower@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            Since Yahoo changed the format of the groups and in my opinion, really messed it up, I'm not sure if this is a post to the group until it shows up.

            As some of you may know, I've had an ongoing sad saga of getting my RL 1000 back up and running.   The controller/charging board was bad for one thing with corrosion and one pin eaten away.   Similar corrosion on the plug going to the manual controller.

            Step one was getting a cleaner/lubricate from Radio Shack which did remove the green corrosion.  Step two, replace the controller/charging board.  Next, 20-pin ribbon cable.  Now, I'm thinking the modular style plug which had corrosion and needs to be replaced.

            It took some investigating to figure out what this plug was.   It is indeed termed a modular-style plug originally used for telephones.  It's the same size as most telephone plugs which are often termed RJ11 plugs.  This means it has six slots or tracks but only four pins.

            However, it uses six of the slots and is termed an RJ12 or an 6P6C plug. This means it is the same size, same number of slots but six pins rather than the four.   I bought an RJ11 crimper tool at Lowes which will crimp RJ11 but not RJ12.

            If in fact it is simply a bad plug, that's a big savings over buying a new controller.   RJ12 crimpers are about 20 bucks up, but I will check with local computer repair shops to see if they can crimp it for me to save time.
          • vvician
            Is there a wiring for this cabble somewhere ?
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 25 12:56 PM
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              Is there a wiring for this cabble somewhere ?


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