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Re: Advice on buying a robo mower

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  • boyerdk1
    Thanks for the response. I live in St. Louis, MO. Can you tell me the difference between mowers with BRUSH and ones without? Is one better than the other?
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 15, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks for the response. I live in St. Louis, MO. Can you tell me the difference between mowers with BRUSH and ones without? Is one better than the other?

      --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Richard Gard <richardgard@...> wrote:
      >
      > hi.  have fun researching - it is a great thing to have the robots.  they do do the work for you, but they do require some care.  I think the care they need is a fraction of what gas mowers need, and the electric robots are more reliable in the long run as long as you don't make them do things out of their design (like getting stuck on a root and burning up their motors)... just like gas mowers.
      >
      > hobbyist is the best.  you will learn as you go.
      >
      > reviews are few
      >
      > you figure out maintenance as you go.  batteries are top priority
      >
      > robomower is great.  get one used or new.  
      >
      > What city do you live in?  that might make a difference in parts or people.
      >
      > good luck
      > R
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...>
      > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 AM
      > Subject: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      > This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:
      >
      > 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?
      >
      > 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?
      >
      > 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?
      >
      > 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?
      >
      > 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?
      >
      > Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Richard Gard
      don t know what BRUSH is  ________________________________ From: boyerdk1 To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 1:32
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 15, 2013
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        don't know what BRUSH is 


        ________________________________
        From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...>
        To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 1:32 PM
        Subject: [RoboMower] Re: Advice on buying a robo mower



         
        Thanks for the response. I live in St. Louis, MO. Can you tell me the difference between mowers with BRUSH and ones without? Is one better than the other?

        --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Richard Gard <richardgard@...> wrote:
        >
        > hi.  have fun researching - it is a great thing to have the robots.  they do do the work for you, but they do require some care.  I think the care they need is a fraction of what gas mowers need, and the electric robots are more reliable in the long run as long as you don't make them do things out of their design (like getting stuck on a root and burning up their motors)... just like gas mowers.
        >
        > hobbyist is the best.  you will learn as you go.
        >
        > reviews are few
        >
        > you figure out maintenance as you go.  batteries are top priority
        >
        > robomower is great.  get one used or new.  
        >
        > What city do you live in?  that might make a difference in parts or people.
        >
        > good luck
        > R
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...>
        > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 AM
        > Subject: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        > This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:
        >
        > 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?
        >
        > 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?
        >
        > 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?
        >
        > 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?
        >
        > 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?
        >
        > Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David L. Johnson
        The Brush is in the motor. It makes electrical contact. I definitely prefer brushless. They last much longer. ... From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 15, 2013
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          The Brush is in the motor. It makes electrical contact. I definitely
          prefer brushless. They last much longer.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of Richard Gard
          Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 2:21 PM
          To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [RoboMower] Re: Advice on buying a robo mower

          don't know what BRUSH is 


          ________________________________
          From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...>
          To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 1:32 PM
          Subject: [RoboMower] Re: Advice on buying a robo mower



           
          Thanks for the response. I live in St. Louis, MO. Can you tell me the
          difference between mowers with BRUSH and ones without? Is one better than
          the other?

          --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Richard Gard <richardgard@...> wrote:
          >
          > hi.  have fun researching - it is a great thing to have the robots.
           they do do the work for you, but they do require some care.  I think the
          care they need is a fraction of what gas mowers need, and the electric
          robots are more reliable in the long run as long as you don't make them do
          things out of their design (like getting stuck on a root and burning up
          their motors)... just like gas mowers.
          >
          > hobbyist is the best.  you will learn as you go.
          >
          > reviews are few
          >
          > you figure out maintenance as you go.  batteries are top priority
          >
          > robomower is great.  get one used or new.  
          >
          > What city do you live in?  that might make a difference in parts or
          people.
          >
          > good luck
          > R
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...>
          > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 AM
          > Subject: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          > This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching
          robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to
          determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot
          with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo
          mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:
          >
          > 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about
          working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?
          >
          > 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?
          >
          > 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain
          these mowers. How big a deal is that?
          >
          > 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality)
          brands vs. better, more reliable brands?
          >
          > 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when
          you first started that you can share with me?
          >
          > Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting
          into this and am hoping to get some good direction.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links




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        • ronald heinz
          I ve got two rl 500 s I ll let go for 500.00. ron heinz 402-292-1015. Papillion,ne. ________________________________ From: Richard Gard
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 15, 2013
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            I've got two rl 500's I'll let go for 500.00. ron heinz 402-292-1015. Papillion,ne.



            ________________________________
            From: Richard Gard <richardgard@...>
            To: "RoboMower@yahoogroups.com" <RoboMower@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 11:20 AM
            Subject: Re: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower


             

            hi.  have fun researching - it is a great thing to have the robots.  they do do the work for you, but they do require some care.  I think the care they need is a fraction of what gas mowers need, and the electric robots are more reliable in the long run as long as you don't make them do things out of their design (like getting stuck on a root and burning up their motors)... just like gas mowers.

            hobbyist is the best.  you will learn as you go.

            reviews are few

            you figure out maintenance as you go.  batteries are top priority

            robomower is great.  get one used or new.  

            What city do you live in?  that might make a difference in parts or people.

            good luck
            R

            ________________________________
            From: boyerdk1 <mailto:boyerdk1%40yahoo.com>
            To: mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 AM
            Subject: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower


             
            This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:

            1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?

            2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?

            3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?

            4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?

            5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?

            Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lee Hart
            ... Brushes do wear out, but they still last for thousands of hours of running time. You re not going to be able to wear out the brushes in a Robomower s
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 15, 2013
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              David L. Johnson wrote:
              > The Brush is in the motor. It makes electrical contact. I definitely
              > prefer brushless. They last much longer.

              Brushes do wear out, but they still last for thousands of hours of
              running time. You're not going to be able to wear out the brushes in a
              Robomower's motors.

              Brushes normally last for the life of the motor. When was the last time
              you ever heard of anyone replacing the brushes in anything?

              Every single electric motor in your car has brushes, and they typically
              last for the life of the car. When they fail, it's usually for some
              other reason than the brushes (rust, overheating, bearings wearing out,
              etc.)

              --
              Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
              -- Albert Einstein
              --
              Lee A. Hart, http://www.sunrise-ev.com/LeesEVs.htm
            • Lee Hart
              Welcome to the RoboMower list, boyerdk1! I ve had a roboMower 850 for about 4 years now, and love it. Maybe I can answer some of your questions, at least based
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 15, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Welcome to the RoboMower list, boyerdk1! I've had a roboMower 850 for
                about 4 years now, and love it. Maybe I can answer some of your
                questions, at least based on my experiences.

                > 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about
                > working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?

                The RoboMower is a stable product that you can "just use". No technical
                knowledge is needed. I have never had to do any maintenance or repairs,
                except:

                a. The original cheap Chinese batteries only lasted one year. I replaced
                them with two Hawker/Enersis "Genesis" G12V13Ah10EP batteries, which are
                still going strong.

                b. The first year, a pine cone got jammed between one wheel and the
                housing, and the motor burned out. I returned it for repair under
                warranty, and it was repaired at no charge.

                > 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various
                > brands?

                Probably so, but I haven't looked for any since I bought it 4 years ago.

                > 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to
                > maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?

                If all goes well, there *isn't* any maintenance. Replacing or sharpening
                the mower blades is about it. I just resharpened mine with a home
                knife/scissor sharpener.

                > 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in
                > quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?

                I've only had the Friendly Robotics RoboMower. I can't say how it
                compares to any others.

                > 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered
                > when you first started that you can share with me?

                The only pitfall has been a yard-nut neighbor that kept cutting the
                perimeter wire that ran between our property. I finally replaced it with
                a 1/8" plastic coated steel cable. He hasn't been able to "accidentally"
                cut that!

                Other than that, I'm happy. The RoboMower doesn't do as good as a job as
                I did myself, but it does a better job than my teenage son (and is more
                reliable). You do have to pick up sticks and pine cones that a regular
                mower would just have chopped up, but that takes less time than mowing
                yourself. The RoboMower takes a *lot* longer to mow; but I don't care
                since I don't have to do it. I just let it run unattended until it runs
                down.

                Hope this helps. :-)
                --
                Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
                -- Albert Einstein
                --
                Lee A. Hart, http://www.sunrise-ev.com/LeesEVs.htm
              • Kevin Turner
                I live in the UK and have owned an RL2000 for about a year. I have got to say that setting up the perimeter wire is a bit of a pain in the bum – especially
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 16, 2013
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                  I live in the UK and have owned an RL2000 for about a year. I have got to say that setting up the perimeter wire is a bit of a pain in the bum – especially if your garden has a complex layout (mine does). You just have to be prepared to keep tweaking the position of the wire to get the optimum. Now I have it the way I prefer, I couldn’t do without it. I have set various programs and zones and the mower just gets on with it. Occasionally, when I get home, I find it has got itself stuck somewhere but not very often. If it has, I just either set it going again or send it home so it can try again the next day. The RL2000 mows for a good 4 hours+ so I get pretty decent coverage. I still have to strim some edges, but that is a lot less hassle than mowing ☺

                  Personally I think they are ideal for people who like gadgets, have some patience, and have a pragmatic approach to small issues (like setting it up), but you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to have one working well. Every time I have an irritation with it, I remember what it was like to mow the garden myself and my irritation soon subsides.



                  ________________________________
                  From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...<mailto:boyerdk1%40yahoo.com>>
                  To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com<mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 AM
                  Subject: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower



                  This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:

                  1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?

                  2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?

                  3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?

                  4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?

                  5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?

                  Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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                • rann_georgia
                  I ve read the replies so far and will weigh in my thoughts. I have a watt/amp meter and figured that each mowing costs about 25 cents in electricity when
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 16, 2013
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                    I've read the replies so far and will weigh in my thoughts.

                    I have a watt/amp meter and figured that each mowing costs about 25 cents in electricity when recharging. I had seen a comparison of gasoline powered mowers versus these for the lifetime of the mowers and I think it was about equal or a bit higher to have a robotic mower.

                    As another poster pointed out, the perimeter wire is the Achilles heel of these beasts. I never had trouble with breaks in the wire until a neighbor woman dug up ground on her side to plant a garden and broke the wire. I eventually decided to solder everything from that point on, apply shrink wrap tubing and coat it in liquid black tape.

                    Lightening is a problem. I live in Georgia and while away, lightening struck destroying the docking station, TV, stereo, fridge and total about 13k of damage. As I was out of town, I had locked the mowing unit up and it was undamaged. Now, I operate it with the battery operated transmitter and use the indoor charger.

                    Theft. No, it won't work without the wire or the transmitter or docking station. However, anyone thinking of stealing it is unlikely to know that. I therefore, mow the yard and then place it in a fairly hidden location.

                    A thief might take the unit, discover that it won't work but unlikely to come knocking on your door saying "here's your mower back." I considered making a garage/tunnel/dog house that the unit would drive into with the docking station at the end. Basic design, wooden stakes in the ground, pressure treated plywood roof that could be raised after removing a padlock making it hard to snatch it.

                    Ants. Occasionally, if it's not used everyday ants may want to make it a nice home for themselves. I've never found that they can get inside the unit, only that they get into the controller compartment.

                    Is it for everyone? No. If the yard is fairly smooth with no holes or tree roots, you can expect a relatively trouble-free mowing for several years.



                    --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "boyerdk1" <boyerdk1@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:
                    >
                    > 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?
                    >
                    > 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?
                    >
                    > 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?
                    >
                    > 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?
                    >
                    > 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?
                    >
                    > Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.
                    >
                  • Danny Miller
                    24v x 20AH = 480 watt/hrs Electricity costs ~$0.11/KWH. The charging cycle is certainly not 100% efficient. On the other hand you don t get a full 20AH run in
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 16, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      24v x 20AH = 480 watt/hrs
                      Electricity costs ~$0.11/KWH.

                      The charging cycle is certainly not 100% efficient. On the other hand
                      you don't get a full 20AH run in most cases. Basically "less than a
                      dime" though.

                      Battery life is another thing though. The replacement cells are $125.
                      In theory you can get 300 full cycles off them, in practice, 200 is
                      probably the max, which would be $0.63/cycle plus the electricity.
                      That's assuming they're maintained well and you keep using them over and
                      over until they're all used up. That is, if you use them 50 times, have
                      something break, put the broken mower in the shed and forget about it
                      until the batts die, it's $125/50= $2.50/cycle.

                      Danny

                      On 7/16/2013 2:14 PM, rann_georgia wrote:
                      > I've read the replies so far and will weigh in my thoughts.
                      >
                      > I have a watt/amp meter and figured that each mowing costs about 25 cents in electricity when recharging. I had seen a comparison of gasoline powered mowers versus these for the lifetime of the mowers and I think it was about equal or a bit higher to have a robotic mower.
                      >
                      > As another poster pointed out, the perimeter wire is the Achilles heel of these beasts. I never had trouble with breaks in the wire until a neighbor woman dug up ground on her side to plant a garden and broke the wire. I eventually decided to solder everything from that point on, apply shrink wrap tubing and coat it in liquid black tape.
                      >
                      > Lightening is a problem. I live in Georgia and while away, lightening struck destroying the docking station, TV, stereo, fridge and total about 13k of damage. As I was out of town, I had locked the mowing unit up and it was undamaged. Now, I operate it with the battery operated transmitter and use the indoor charger.
                      >
                      > Theft. No, it won't work without the wire or the transmitter or docking station. However, anyone thinking of stealing it is unlikely to know that. I therefore, mow the yard and then place it in a fairly hidden location.
                      >
                      > A thief might take the unit, discover that it won't work but unlikely to come knocking on your door saying "here's your mower back." I considered making a garage/tunnel/dog house that the unit would drive into with the docking station at the end. Basic design, wooden stakes in the ground, pressure treated plywood roof that could be raised after removing a padlock making it hard to snatch it.
                      >
                      > Ants. Occasionally, if it's not used everyday ants may want to make it a nice home for themselves. I've never found that they can get inside the unit, only that they get into the controller compartment.
                      >
                      > Is it for everyone? No. If the yard is fairly smooth with no holes or tree roots, you can expect a relatively trouble-free mowing for several years.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "boyerdk1" <boyerdk1@...> wrote:
                      >> This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:
                      >>
                      >> 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?
                      >>
                      >> 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?
                      >>
                      >> 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?
                      >>
                      >> 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?
                      >>
                      >> 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?
                      >>
                      >> Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.
                      >>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Gene Harvey
                      My first RoboMower was a refurbished 500 from WOOT, bought in 2005. Its life ended with getting stuck on a root and ruining the gears that drove one of the
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 17, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        My first RoboMower was a refurbished 500 from WOOT, bought in 2005. Its life ended with getting stuck on a root and ruining the gears that drove one of the wheels. I bought an 850 to replace it. It has been going strong for years. I learned that the batteries need to be charged separately and when they are cool. My current set of batteries are on their fourth year of use. I sold my gas mower because I never need a backup. I have replaced blades a few times. I have needed to lay new wire were it has been cut a couple of times. This is all of the maintenance that has been required. RobowMowers have worked well for me, so I have not looked at replacing them with something else. This group has been great when I have needed answers to my questions.

                        I too, wish you good luck.
                        Gene




                        ________________________________
                        From: Richard Gard <richardgard@...>
                        To: "RoboMower@yahoogroups.com" <RoboMower@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 10:20 AM
                        Subject: Re: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower



                         
                        hi.  have fun researching - it is a great thing to have the robots.  they do do the work for you, but they do require some care.  I think the care they need is a fraction of what gas mowers need, and the electric robots are more reliable in the long run as long as you don't make them do things out of their design (like getting stuck on a root and burning up their motors)... just like gas mowers.

                        hobbyist is the best.  you will learn as you go.

                        reviews are few

                        you figure out maintenance as you go.  batteries are top priority

                        robomower is great.  get one used or new.  

                        What city do you live in?  that might make a difference in parts or people.

                        good luck
                        R

                        ________________________________
                        From: boyerdk1 <boyerdk1@...>
                        To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 8:38 AM
                        Subject: [RoboMower] Advice on buying a robo mower


                         
                        This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:

                        1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?

                        2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?

                        3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?

                        4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?

                        5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?

                        Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • bluenosr
                        I ll weigh in too. I have an RL1000 and I m halfway through my 6th season. My battery still gives me ~2-2 1/2 hours on a charge, but I ve bought a new set this
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 22, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I'll weigh in too.

                          I have an RL1000 and I'm halfway through my 6th season. My battery still gives me ~2-2 1/2 hours on a charge, but I've bought a new set this year. I've got approx 7000 square feet in front yard, 5000 square feet in back. If I can get back to 3 1/2 hours + run time on a charge, I can get the entire front yard done in one shot, hardly ever a missed spot. Hec, 2 1/2 hours barely misses a spot. While I'm still able to purchase them, I would not do without it, I love it. Not a big fan of the mowers that mow a bit, charge a bit, mow a bit more. I don't want to spend 5 hours + watching my mower, I'd prefer mowing in just one session. The RL1000 is big and burly enough to handle it.

                          --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Danny Miller <dannym@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > 24v x 20AH = 480 watt/hrs
                          > Electricity costs ~$0.11/KWH.
                          >
                          > The charging cycle is certainly not 100% efficient. On the other hand
                          > you don't get a full 20AH run in most cases. Basically "less than a
                          > dime" though.
                          >
                          > Battery life is another thing though. The replacement cells are $125.
                          > In theory you can get 300 full cycles off them, in practice, 200 is
                          > probably the max, which would be $0.63/cycle plus the electricity.
                          > That's assuming they're maintained well and you keep using them over and
                          > over until they're all used up. That is, if you use them 50 times, have
                          > something break, put the broken mower in the shed and forget about it
                          > until the batts die, it's $125/50= $2.50/cycle.
                          >
                          > Danny
                          >
                          > On 7/16/2013 2:14 PM, rann_georgia wrote:
                          > > I've read the replies so far and will weigh in my thoughts.
                          > >
                          > > I have a watt/amp meter and figured that each mowing costs about 25 cents in electricity when recharging. I had seen a comparison of gasoline powered mowers versus these for the lifetime of the mowers and I think it was about equal or a bit higher to have a robotic mower.
                          > >
                          > > As another poster pointed out, the perimeter wire is the Achilles heel of these beasts. I never had trouble with breaks in the wire until a neighbor woman dug up ground on her side to plant a garden and broke the wire. I eventually decided to solder everything from that point on, apply shrink wrap tubing and coat it in liquid black tape.
                          > >
                          > > Lightening is a problem. I live in Georgia and while away, lightening struck destroying the docking station, TV, stereo, fridge and total about 13k of damage. As I was out of town, I had locked the mowing unit up and it was undamaged. Now, I operate it with the battery operated transmitter and use the indoor charger.
                          > >
                          > > Theft. No, it won't work without the wire or the transmitter or docking station. However, anyone thinking of stealing it is unlikely to know that. I therefore, mow the yard and then place it in a fairly hidden location.
                          > >
                          > > A thief might take the unit, discover that it won't work but unlikely to come knocking on your door saying "here's your mower back." I considered making a garage/tunnel/dog house that the unit would drive into with the docking station at the end. Basic design, wooden stakes in the ground, pressure treated plywood roof that could be raised after removing a padlock making it hard to snatch it.
                          > >
                          > > Ants. Occasionally, if it's not used everyday ants may want to make it a nice home for themselves. I've never found that they can get inside the unit, only that they get into the controller compartment.
                          > >
                          > > Is it for everyone? No. If the yard is fairly smooth with no holes or tree roots, you can expect a relatively trouble-free mowing for several years.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "boyerdk1" <boyerdk1@> wrote:
                          > >> This is my first post so sorry for the length. I have been researching robo mowers and am finding it difficult to know what I should be doing to determine whether to pursue buying one or not. I have a double city lot with a practically flat yard. I see that there are quite a range of robo mowers available both in cost and function. Here are my basic questions:
                          > >>
                          > >> 1. Is this really a market for hobbyists who already know a lot about working with this technology, or is it stable enough for neophytes?
                          > >>
                          > >> 2. Are there reputable reviews and comparisons for the various brands?
                          > >>
                          > >> 3. The number one issue I keep reading about is being able to maintain these mowers. How big a deal is that?
                          > >>
                          > >> 4. Does brand make a big difference? Are there really cheap (in quality) brands vs. better, more reliable brands?
                          > >>
                          > >> 5. Are there any major pitfalls that any of you may have discovered when you first started that you can share with me?
                          > >>
                          > >> Thanks for any information you can provide. I am excited about getting into this and am hoping to get some good direction.
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ------------------------------------
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
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