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New perimeter switch power supply

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  • daryl_reece
    I bought 2 perimeter switches from Ebay. One was the style with which I am familiar, 3 c cell batteries to power it. The other one had the 32VDC battery
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 25, 2012
      I bought 2 perimeter switches from Ebay. One was the style with which I am familiar, 3 c cell batteries to power it. The other one had the 32VDC battery charger included with it and 4 huge resistors on the perimeter switch pcb. No batteries. Is that the new style? I want to make sure it is safe to plug the 32VDC power supply into the perimeter switch before I fry it.
    • Doug Smith
      I believe the permitter switch with the power jack is an older model. Some of the newer ones still have a place for the connector on the PCB but the parts
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 26, 2012
        I believe the permitter switch with the power jack is an older model. Some of the newer ones still have a place for the connector on the PCB but the parts aren't included.

        I don't think any mowers actually included an AC adapter, though. You would probably want only a 6v adapter for that purpose. I had a 6v adapter around that worked well with my older permitter switch.

        Is the 32v power supply the one for charging the mower? It's way too high voltage for the permitter switch.

        --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "daryl_reece" <dsr14@...> wrote:
        >
        > I bought 2 perimeter switches from Ebay. One was the style with which I am familiar, 3 c cell batteries to power it. The other one had the 32VDC battery charger included with it and 4 huge resistors on the perimeter switch pcb. No batteries. Is that the new style? I want to make sure it is safe to plug the 32VDC power supply into the perimeter switch before I fry it.
        >
      • Christopher Zach
        ... High is relative; the board includes a 7805 voltage regulator right in the front of the power paths. So as long as you don t top the input voltage of a
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 26, 2012
          On 4/26/2012 9:34 AM, Doug Smith wrote:
          > Is the 32v power supply the one for charging the mower? It's way too
          > high voltage for the permitter switch.

          High is relative; the board includes a 7805 voltage regulator right in
          the front of the power paths. So as long as you don't top the input
          voltage of a 7805 you should be fine.

          C
        • Doug Smith
          That s true. Depending on the variation of the 7805 it could possibly handle it. It s not unusual to see a 7805 with a max input voltage of 35v.
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 27, 2012
            That's true. Depending on the variation of the 7805 it could possibly handle it. It's not unusual to see a 7805 with a max input voltage of 35v.

            --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Zach <cz@...> wrote:
            >
            > On 4/26/2012 9:34 AM, Doug Smith wrote:
            > > Is the 32v power supply the one for charging the mower? It's way too
            > > high voltage for the permitter switch.
            >
            > High is relative; the board includes a 7805 voltage regulator right in
            > the front of the power paths. So as long as you don't top the input
            > voltage of a 7805 you should be fine.
            >
            > C
            >
          • Lee Hart
            ... True; but that s the absolute maximum one-time surge rating. If used continuously at such voltages, life will be quite short. If it really has to work with
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 27, 2012
              On 4/27/2012 6:11 AM, Doug Smith wrote:
              > That's true. Depending on the variation of the 7805 it could possibly handle it. It's not unusual to see a 7805 with a max input voltage of 35v.

              True; but that's the absolute maximum one-time surge rating. If used
              continuously at such voltages, life will be quite short.

              If it really has to work with 32vdc on the input, there are better parts
              with a higher maximum input rating.

              Also watch out for heat. A linear regulator burns up the voltage
              difference (32v-5v) as heat. With such a large input-output difference,
              the part could run excessively hot. Again, that makes it fail early.

              Why would they have such a high input voltage? It seems pointless.

              --
              A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is
              nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
              -- Antoine de Saint Exupéry
              --
              Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart at earthlink.net
            • Christopher Zach
              ... True, however heat comes from power, which is I*E. Since the current draw of the perimeter switch is really small (it can run off 3 C batteries for a
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 27, 2012
                On 4/27/2012 10:44 AM, Lee Hart wrote:
                > Also watch out for heat. A linear regulator burns up the voltage
                > difference (32v-5v) as heat. With such a large input-output difference,
                > the part could run excessively hot. Again, that makes it fail early.

                True, however heat comes from power, which is I*E. Since the current
                draw of the perimeter switch is really small (it can run off 3 C
                batteries for a season with no trouble) I would guess that the power
                dropped as heat would be very small as well.

                > Why would they have such a high input voltage? It seems pointless.

                Maybe so they could source it from the same 32 volt power supply as the
                charger? Oddly enough the 7805 is a drain when using the batteries, as 3
                C cells will only put out 4.5 volts regardless.

                In the meantime I have one of my perimeter switches apart: This one I
                installed last year as new, and put it in the shed for the winter. Come
                spring it didn't work, took it apart and found that the rubber gasket
                behind the PCB didn't work so well; there was rust all over the board,
                and the little PCB button was the source of said rust.

                Cleaned it with alcohol and it immediately goes to beep, even with the
                output jumpered. My first guess is rust residue on the chip pins, so
                I'll have to get some dedicated cleaner with a brush to clean this off.
                Note that this model (unlike my "old" one) is *not* conformal coated.
                Once I fix it I'll put some coating on it....

                Chris
              • Lee Hart
                Christopher Zach wrote: ... I really don t know how much current it draws. The batteries may last a season, but that s operating maybe a couple hours a week.
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 27, 2012
                  Christopher Zach wrote:
                  Lee Hart wrote:
                  >> Also watch out for heat.

                  > True, however heat comes from power, which is I*E. Since the current
                  > draw of the perimeter switch is really small (it can run off 3 C
                  > batteries for a season with no trouble) I would guess that the power
                  > dropped as heat would be very small as well.

                  I really don't know how much current it draws. The batteries may last a
                  season, but that's operating maybe a couple hours a week. It's still too
                  early to start mowing here in Minnesota (except for my yard-nut
                  neighbor), but I'll see if I can measure it when I get the Robomower
                  back out.

                  > perimeter switch... didn't work, there was rust all over the board,
                  > and the little PCB button was the source of said rust...
                  > this model (unlike my "old" one) is *not* conformal coated.
                  > Once I fix it I'll put some coating on it....

                  Yeah, conformal coating costs money. Customer don't know, so they don't
                  care, so leave it out. They'll just buy a new one anyway. More $$$ for
                  CEO bonuses.

                  --
                  Humanity is acquiring all the right technology for all the wrong reasons.
                  -- R. Buckminster Fuller
                  --
                  Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart at earthlink.net
                • daryl_reece
                  This is definitely a different style. I m familiar with the old style that could accommodate a 6VDC supply. I more closely examined the box and it is
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 27, 2012
                    This is definitely a different style. I'm familiar with the old style that could accommodate a 6VDC supply. I more closely examined the box and it is labelled 85161 for RM models. Anyone know the difference? I haven't tried it with my RL version.

                    --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Doug Smith" <Doug@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I believe the permitter switch with the power jack is an older model. Some of the newer ones still have a place for the connector on the PCB but the parts aren't included.
                    >
                    > I don't think any mowers actually included an AC adapter, though. You would probably want only a 6v adapter for that purpose. I had a 6v adapter around that worked well with my older permitter switch.
                    >
                    > Is the 32v power supply the one for charging the mower? It's way too high voltage for the permitter switch.
                    >
                    > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "daryl_reece" <dsr14@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I bought 2 perimeter switches from Ebay. One was the style with which I am familiar, 3 c cell batteries to power it. The other one had the 32VDC battery charger included with it and 4 huge resistors on the perimeter switch pcb. No batteries. Is that the new style? I want to make sure it is safe to plug the 32VDC power supply into the perimeter switch before I fry it.
                    > >
                    >
                  • bkelley9401
                    Re: New perimeter switch power supply (UPDATE) Check the parts list here it should be a 24vdc or 34vdc power supply if it is for an RM mower. Part numbers
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 28, 2012
                      Re: New perimeter switch power supply (UPDATE)
                      Check the parts list here it should be a 24vdc or 34vdc power supply if it is for an RM mower. Part numbers don't match but, i'll leave that up to you to check out.
                      http://www.magic-parts.co.uk/acatalog/Robomow-RM-Series.php
                      http://www.magic-parts.co.uk/acatalog/300mA--34V--Power-Supply--UK--for-Perimeter-Switch--PWS0014A.html

                      Check the parts list here it should be a 24vdc power supply if it is for an RM
                      mower. Part numbers don't match but, i'll leave that up to you to check out.
                      http://www.magic-parts.co.uk/acatalog/Robomow-RM-Series.php



                      --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "daryl_reece" <dsr14@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > This is definitely a different style. I'm familiar with the old style that could accommodate a 6VDC supply. I more closely examined the box and it is labelled 85161 for RM models. Anyone know the difference? I haven't tried it with my RL version.
                      >
                      > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Doug Smith" <Doug@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I believe the permitter switch with the power jack is an older model. Some of the newer ones still have a place for the connector on the PCB but the parts aren't included.
                      > >
                      > > I don't think any mowers actually included an AC adapter, though. You would probably want only a 6v adapter for that purpose. I had a 6v adapter around that worked well with my older permitter switch.
                      > >
                      > > Is the 32v power supply the one for charging the mower? It's way too high voltage for the permitter switch.
                      > >
                      > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "daryl_reece" <dsr14@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > I bought 2 perimeter switches from Ebay. One was the style with which I am familiar, 3 c cell batteries to power it. The other one had the 32VDC battery charger included with it and 4 huge resistors on the perimeter switch pcb. No batteries. Is that the new style? I want to make sure it is safe to plug the 32VDC power supply into the perimeter switch before I fry it.
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • bkelley9401
                      Part # for the RL/RM perimeter switch power supply is PWS0013A (US) 300ma 34vdc. This was listed under the RL spare parts.
                      Message 10 of 10 , Apr 28, 2012
                        Part # for the RL/RM perimeter switch power supply is PWS0013A (US) 300ma 34vdc. This was listed under the RL spare parts.
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