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RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help

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  • Benjamin Hill
    I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½ inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing, solder it, and
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 19, 2010
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      I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½ inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing, solder it, and then use a heat gun to seal the shrink tubing. It takes about 10 minutes, but it should last for years.



      Ben





      From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Gard
      Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 7:39 AM
      To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help





      In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far). The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will get better.
      Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.

      Richard in new england.
      Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since April)..

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@... <mailto:twolff69%40hotmail.com> >
      Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
      To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> >
      Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help

      I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.

      I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.

      The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.

      You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.

      To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.

      I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.

      Tim Wolff

      > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
      > From: khawn@... <mailto:khawn%40yahoo.com>
      > Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -

      [The entire original message is not included]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ricew0
      I use an appropriate size of regular wire nuts and fill them with silicone caulk. I have not had a problem either. Ward
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 19, 2010
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        I use an appropriate size of regular wire nuts and fill them with silicone caulk. I have not had a problem either.

        Ward

        --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Benjamin Hill" <ben@...> wrote:
        >
        > I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½ inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing, solder it, and then use a heat gun to seal the shrink tubing. It takes about 10 minutes, but it should last for years.
        >
        >
        >
        > Ben
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Gard
        > Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 7:39 AM
        > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far). The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will get better.
        > Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.
        >
        > Richard in new england.
        > Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since April)..
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@... <mailto:twolff69%40hotmail.com> >
        > Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
        > To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> >
        > Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
        >
        > I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.
        >
        > I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
        >
        > The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
        >
        > You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.
        >
        > To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
        >
        > I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.
        >
        > Tim Wolff
        >
        > > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > From: khawn@... <mailto:khawn%40yahoo.com>
        > > Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -
        >
        > [The entire original message is not included]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • bkelley9401
        My wire nuts filled with dielectric grease have lasted 6 years no problems. Sent with my TR-80 over land-line.
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 19, 2010
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          My wire nuts filled with dielectric grease have lasted 6 years no problems.

          Sent with my TR-80 over land-line.

          --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Richard Gard <richardgard@...> wrote:
          >
          > In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far). The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will get better.
          > Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.
          >
          > Richard in new england.
          > Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since April)..
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@...>
          > Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
          > To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com>
          > Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
          >
          >
          >
          > I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.
          >
          > I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
          >
          > The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
          >
          > You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.
          >
          > To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
          >
          > I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.
          >
          > Tim Wolff
          >
          > > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
          > > From: khawn@...
          > > Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -
          >
          > [The entire original message is not included]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Richard Gard
          Love the TR-80 ~richard Sent via Xerox running CPM on 8 DSDD ... From: bkelley9401 Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:26 AM To:
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 19, 2010
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            Love the TR-80

            ~richard
            Sent via Xerox running CPM on 8" DSDD


            -----Original Message-----
            From: bkelley9401 <neverheardofhim@...>
            Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:26 AM
            To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help




            My wire nuts filled with dielectric grease have lasted 6 years no problems

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Danny Miller
            Do not use silicone caulk on wire. Caulk produces acetic acid- vinegar- as it cures. Which explains the vinegar-like stink it makes until dry. Acetic acid
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 19, 2010
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              Do not use silicone caulk on wire.

              Caulk produces acetic acid- vinegar- as it cures. Which explains the
              vinegar-like stink it makes until dry.
              Acetic acid aggressively corrodes copper (turns it green). Even solid
              wire will be damaged. Stranded could be corroded all the way through.

              Once it's fully cured, silicone caulk is not corrosive to copper, but
              it's a long time before every last trace of acetic acid leaves it. But
              since it's so aggressive, even traces continue to have a significant
              effect on copper.

              Dielectric grease is the appropriate solution.

              I'm not that big on wire nuts myself because they lower the mechanical
              strength of the wire. If it gets pulled tight, it can untwist itself
              out of the wire nut or simply break because of the way the copper is
              bent there weakens it. Though I gotta say I've had problems with the
              crimped-on linear connectors getting pulled apart under tension too.

              Danny

              ricew0 wrote:
              > I use an appropriate size of regular wire nuts and fill them with silicone caulk. I have not had a problem either.
              >
              > Ward
              >
              > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Benjamin Hill" <ben@...> wrote:
              >
              >> I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½ inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing, solder it, and then use a heat gun to seal the shrink tubing. It takes about 10 minutes, but it should last for years.
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Ben
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Gard
              >> Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 7:39 AM
              >> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
              >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far). The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will get better.
              >> Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.
              >>
              >> Richard in new england.
              >> Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since April)..
              >>
              >> -----Original Message-----
              >> From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@... <mailto:twolff69%40hotmail.com> >
              >> Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
              >> To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> >
              >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
              >>
              >> I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.
              >>
              >> I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
              >>
              >> The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
              >>
              >> You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.
              >>
              >> To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
              >>
              >> I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.
              >>
              >> Tim Wolff
              >>
              >>
              >>> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
              >>> From: khawn@... <mailto:khawn%40yahoo.com>
              >>> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -
              >>>
              >> [The entire original message is not included]
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • toolman_d
              I ve use the waterproof wire nuts (direct burial connectors) with no issues (going on 6 years now). Found in the electrical isle at Home Depot. Just this
              Message 6 of 19 , Jul 19, 2010
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                I've use the waterproof wire nuts (direct burial connectors) with no issues (going on 6 years now). Found in the electrical isle at Home Depot. Just this weekend I cut through the wire to replace a sprinker head - I immediately realized it just as I pushed the shovel through it. I'll use these nuts to fix it. If I can't pull the cut wires together I'll just add about a 3 inch length of wire and use 2 nuts.



                --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Danny Miller <dannym@...> wrote:
                >
                > Do not use silicone caulk on wire.
                >
                > Caulk produces acetic acid- vinegar- as it cures. Which explains the
                > vinegar-like stink it makes until dry.
                > Acetic acid aggressively corrodes copper (turns it green). Even solid
                > wire will be damaged. Stranded could be corroded all the way through.
                >
                > Once it's fully cured, silicone caulk is not corrosive to copper, but
                > it's a long time before every last trace of acetic acid leaves it. But
                > since it's so aggressive, even traces continue to have a significant
                > effect on copper.
                >
                > Dielectric grease is the appropriate solution.
                >
                > I'm not that big on wire nuts myself because they lower the mechanical
                > strength of the wire. If it gets pulled tight, it can untwist itself
                > out of the wire nut or simply break because of the way the copper is
                > bent there weakens it. Though I gotta say I've had problems with the
                > crimped-on linear connectors getting pulled apart under tension too.
                >
                > Danny
                >
                > ricew0 wrote:
                > > I use an appropriate size of regular wire nuts and fill them with silicone caulk. I have not had a problem either.
                > >
                > > Ward
                > >
                > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Benjamin Hill" <ben@> wrote:
                > >
                > >> I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½ inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing, solder it, and then use a heat gun to seal the shrink tubing. It takes about 10 minutes, but it should last for years.
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> Ben
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Gard
                > >> Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 7:39 AM
                > >> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
                > >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far). The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will get better.
                > >> Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.
                > >>
                > >> Richard in new england.
                > >> Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since April)..
                > >>
                > >> -----Original Message-----
                > >> From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@ <mailto:twolff69%40hotmail.com> >
                > >> Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
                > >> To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> >
                > >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                > >>
                > >> I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.
                > >>
                > >> I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
                > >>
                > >> The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
                > >>
                > >> You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.
                > >>
                > >> To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
                > >>
                > >> I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.
                > >>
                > >> Tim Wolff
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                > >>> From: khawn@ <mailto:khawn%40yahoo.com>
                > >>> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -
                > >>>
                > >> [The entire original message is not included]
                > >>
                > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >>
                > >>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • KennethH
                I read your suggestion about putting the bare wires on the internal connections in the perimeter box. Would using another connector (that works)do the same
                Message 7 of 19 , Jul 26, 2010
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                  I read your suggestion about putting the bare wires on the internal connections in the perimeter box. Would using another connector (that works)do the same thing?

                  Ken
                  Jacksonville




                  --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Tim Wolff <twolff69@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Tim Wolff
                  >
                  > > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
                  > > From: khawn@...
                  > > Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -0400
                  > > Subject: Re: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                  > >
                  > > If there was a problem in the perimeter box then I would have the same issues with the back yard perimeter. When I plug up the rear perimeter it works fine.
                  > >
                  > > Sent from Ken Hawn's iPhone
                  > >
                  > > On Jul 18, 2010, at 7:46 AM, "bkelley9401" <neverheardofhim@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Ken you say you have a battery warning this has nothing to do with the perimeter wire, a cut wire warning deals with perimeter wire problems. In either case open your P-switch you may have to remove the battery holder and clean and tighten all connections.
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "KennethH" <khawn@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I thought I was going to make it through the summer without any hitches. Not so. Here is my issue. I use my perimeter box for my front yard and the back yard and have to use separate hook-up for each. My front yard is the issue. There are 3 perimeters (hooked together) in the front yard. My perimeter box was giving me a battery warning for the front yard, but not the back yard. I have new batteries in the perimeter box.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > There is only one broken wire in the front yard setup. I thought that it was corroded. Well my tester was getting a signal on both sides of the repaired break, so I didn't bother it. My final experiment was to isolate my first perimeter. This perimeter goes from the box to a driveway crack, then across the crack to the other perimeters and then feeds back across the same driveway crack on the way back to the box. This arrangement has worked for years. My tester was picking up a good signal, in the first perimeter and two feet back from the driveway crack. So, there was a four foot separation between the wires I was testing.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Here is the question. Isn't it safe to presume that if there is a good signal in the first perimeter that the other two perimeters will be OK?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I don't know what I did, but I plugged the wired back into the perimeter box and again and it started working. Don't know why.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Ken Hawn
                  > > > > Jacksonville, Fl
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------
                  > >
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > _________________________________________________________________
                  > The New Busy is not the old busy. Search, chat and e-mail from your inbox.
                  > http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_3
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • KennethH
                  I saw those waterproof wire nuts at Home Depot. Do you put dielectric grease in the nut? I haven t been able to find dielectric gease anywhere. Maybe I need
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jul 26, 2010
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                    I saw those waterproof wire nuts at Home Depot. Do you put dielectric grease in the nut? I haven't been able to find dielectric gease anywhere. Maybe I need to try an electric shop. I did buy some anti-oxident stuff that stops corrosion. If the waterproof wire nut work without any grease, I might consider buying some.

                    Ken

                    Jacksonville




                    --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "toolman_d" <toolman_d@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I've use the waterproof wire nuts (direct burial connectors) with no issues (going on 6 years now). Found in the electrical isle at Home Depot. Just this weekend I cut through the wire to replace a sprinker head - I immediately realized it just as I pushed the shovel through it. I'll use these nuts to fix it. If I can't pull the cut wires together I'll just add about a 3 inch length of wire and use 2 nuts.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, Danny Miller <dannym@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Do not use silicone caulk on wire.
                    > >
                    > > Caulk produces acetic acid- vinegar- as it cures. Which explains the
                    > > vinegar-like stink it makes until dry.
                    > > Acetic acid aggressively corrodes copper (turns it green). Even solid
                    > > wire will be damaged. Stranded could be corroded all the way through.
                    > >
                    > > Once it's fully cured, silicone caulk is not corrosive to copper, but
                    > > it's a long time before every last trace of acetic acid leaves it. But
                    > > since it's so aggressive, even traces continue to have a significant
                    > > effect on copper.
                    > >
                    > > Dielectric grease is the appropriate solution.
                    > >
                    > > I'm not that big on wire nuts myself because they lower the mechanical
                    > > strength of the wire. If it gets pulled tight, it can untwist itself
                    > > out of the wire nut or simply break because of the way the copper is
                    > > bent there weakens it. Though I gotta say I've had problems with the
                    > > crimped-on linear connectors getting pulled apart under tension too.
                    > >
                    > > Danny
                    > >
                    > > ricew0 wrote:
                    > > > I use an appropriate size of regular wire nuts and fill them with silicone caulk. I have not had a problem either.
                    > > >
                    > > > Ward
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Benjamin Hill" <ben@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > >> I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½ inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing, solder it, and then use a heat gun to seal the shrink tubing. It takes about 10 minutes, but it should last for years.
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Ben
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >> From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Gard
                    > > >> Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 7:39 AM
                    > > >> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
                    > > >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >> In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far). The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will get better.
                    > > >> Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Richard in new england.
                    > > >> Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since April)..
                    > > >>
                    > > >> -----Original Message-----
                    > > >> From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@ <mailto:twolff69%40hotmail.com> >
                    > > >> Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
                    > > >> To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> >
                    > > >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good batteries on only one of my zones.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at Harbor Freight Tools.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside. Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to solder, but I haven't tested them.
                    > > >>
                    > > >> Tim Wolff
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > > >>> From: khawn@ <mailto:khawn%40yahoo.com>
                    > > >>> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -
                    > > >>>
                    > > >> [The entire original message is not included]
                    > > >>
                    > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >>
                    > > >>
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > ------------------------------------
                    > > >
                    > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                  • Dan Barclay
                    The waterproof nuts have grease already in them. I haven’t had trouble with them. Generally I bend the wire so the pointy end is up so that water doesn’t
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jul 26, 2010
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      The waterproof nuts have grease already in them.



                      I haven’t had trouble with them. Generally I bend the wire so the pointy
                      end is up so that water doesn’t collect in them (even when they’re buried).



                      Dan



                      From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      Of KennethH
                      Sent: Monday, July 26, 2010 7:35 PM
                      To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help





                      I saw those waterproof wire nuts at Home Depot. Do you put dielectric grease
                      in the nut? I haven't been able to find dielectric gease anywhere. Maybe I
                      need to try an electric shop. I did buy some anti-oxident stuff that stops
                      corrosion. If the waterproof wire nut work without any grease, I might
                      consider buying some.

                      Ken

                      Jacksonville

                      --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                      "toolman_d" <toolman_d@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I've use the waterproof wire nuts (direct burial connectors) with no
                      issues (going on 6 years now). Found in the electrical isle at Home Depot.
                      Just this weekend I cut through the wire to replace a sprinker head - I
                      immediately realized it just as I pushed the shovel through it. I'll use
                      these nuts to fix it. If I can't pull the cut wires together I'll just add
                      about a 3 inch length of wire and use 2 nuts.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                      Danny Miller <dannym@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Do not use silicone caulk on wire.
                      > >
                      > > Caulk produces acetic acid- vinegar- as it cures. Which explains the
                      > > vinegar-like stink it makes until dry.
                      > > Acetic acid aggressively corrodes copper (turns it green). Even solid
                      > > wire will be damaged. Stranded could be corroded all the way through.
                      > >
                      > > Once it's fully cured, silicone caulk is not corrosive to copper, but
                      > > it's a long time before every last trace of acetic acid leaves it. But
                      > > since it's so aggressive, even traces continue to have a significant
                      > > effect on copper.
                      > >
                      > > Dielectric grease is the appropriate solution.
                      > >
                      > > I'm not that big on wire nuts myself because they lower the mechanical
                      > > strength of the wire. If it gets pulled tight, it can untwist itself
                      > > out of the wire nut or simply break because of the way the copper is
                      > > bent there weakens it. Though I gotta say I've had problems with the
                      > > crimped-on linear connectors getting pulled apart under tension too.
                      > >
                      > > Danny
                      > >
                      > > ricew0 wrote:
                      > > > I use an appropriate size of regular wire nuts and fill them with
                      silicone caulk. I have not had a problem either.
                      > > >
                      > > > Ward
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                      , "Benjamin Hill" <ben@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >> I agree. Solder is the best way to repair the wires. I strip about ½
                      inch of insulation back on each side, slip on a piece of shrink tubing,
                      solder it, and then use a heat gun to seal the shrink tubing. It takes about
                      10 minutes, but it should last for years.
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >> Ben
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >> From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                      [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
                      Behalf Of Richard Gard
                      > > >> Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 7:39 AM
                      > > >> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >> In my yard crimped and tightly taped connections last about 3 months
                      before intermittent problems arise; soldered joints last 4+ years (so far).
                      The time hassle is getting out the testing and repairing tools and finding
                      the break, plus rationalizing time away hoping the intermittent break will
                      get better.
                      > > >> Use solder, do it only once, and you will save lots of time.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> Richard in new england.
                      > > >> Using EB batteries now this season and they are excellent (since
                      April)..
                      > > >>
                      > > >> -----Original Message-----
                      > > >> From: Tim Wolff <twolff69@ <mailto:twolff69%40hotmail.com> >
                      > > >> Sent: Sunday, July 18, 2010 10:12 AM
                      > > >> To: Robo Mower <robomower@yahoogroups.com
                      <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:robomower%40yahoogroups.com> >
                      > > >> Subject: RE: [RoboMower] Re: Need some help
                      > > >>
                      > > >> I had a perimeter switch beeping a battery warning with good
                      batteries on only one of my zones.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> I use alligator clips at the perimeter switches and clip them to the
                      bare wire ends of each zone. The clips eleminate any possibe problems with
                      the stock (obscenely expensive) connectors.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> The problem wound up being an old repair (splice) on the problem zone
                      that has gone south. It was not open, but did have a high resistance.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> You'll need to check the problem zone for a higer than normal
                      resistance. It should be fairly obvious with a DMM set to read resistance
                      (ohms). If you don't have one, you can get inexpensive (less than $10) at
                      Harbor Freight Tools.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> To check it out TODAY. Remove the connector from the perimeter wire
                      and connect them directly to the perimeter switch screw terminals inside.
                      Polarity does not matter. If it works, you have a high resistance (bad
                      connection) in the connector. If it still does not work just dig up any
                      repairs you have made to the problem zone. Chances are that the bad splice
                      will pull apart before you get it out of the ground.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> I've found that the crimp-on wire splices allways fail. I've been
                      soldering and covering the repair with heat shrink tubing on mine. Water
                      proof wire nuts may also be an option if you don't have the ability to
                      solder, but I haven't tested them.
                      > > >>
                      > > >> Tim Wolff
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>> To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                      <mailto:RoboMower%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > >>> From: khawn@ <mailto:khawn%40yahoo.com>
                      > > >>> Date: Sun, 18 Jul 2010 07:53:59 -
                      > > >>>
                      > > >> [The entire original message is not included]
                      > > >>
                      > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >>
                      > > >>
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > ------------------------------------
                      > > >
                      > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >





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