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Re: [RoboMower] Re: wire problems again

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  • tysamigo@aol.com
    Ken, The P.Switch uses DC C-cell batteries to power the unit. The unit s output is an AC signal at a specific frequency, V and I to properly generate the
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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      Ken,

      The P.Switch uses DC C-cell batteries to power the unit. The unit's output
      is an AC signal at a specific frequency, V and I to properly generate the
      artificial electromagnetic field necessary for the mower to operate
      automatically. Very simple :)

      Tyler



      In a message dated 8/7/2006 3:37:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      khawn8@... writes:

      OK. Now I am confused. All Batteries use DC power. Are you saying
      that my perimeter box is changing the current to AC?

      Ken






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Austin Morgan
      No, He is saying that energy ( or matter for that matter ) can be converted from one form to another relatively easily. Therefore do not assume that the input
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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        No,
        He is saying that energy ( or matter for that matter ) can be converted from
        one form to another relatively easily. Therefore do not assume that the input
        = output. Just so people know, what is put out is basically RF at very low
        energy levels.

        Austin Morgan

        khawn (khawn8@...) wrote:
        >
        > OK. Now I am confused. All Batteries use DC power. Are you saying
        > that my perimeter box is changing the current to AC?
        >
        > Ken
        >
        >
        > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Dan Barclay" <Dan@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Ken,
        > >
        > > While batteries are DC, they are just a power supply. An iPod runs on
        > > batteries as well, but the audio you hear isn't DC.
        > >
        > > I can't point you to an archive of messages here, but finding a
        > broken wire
        > > has been discussed a number of times and there are some good tips here.
        > >
        > > If I were going to find a broken wire (and I have<g>) I'd use a tone
        > > generator and pickup as described in previous messages here.
        > Failing that,
        > > you need something that measures resistance (ohms).
        > >
        > > Dan
        > >
        > > > -----Original Message-----
        > > > From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On
        > > > Behalf Of khawn
        > > > Sent: Monday, August 07, 2006 11:49 AM
        > > > To: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Subject: [RoboMower] Re: wire problems again
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe batteries are always DC.
        > > >
        > > > Ken
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "Tstewartjr" <tstewartjr@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In RoboMower@yahoogroups.com, "khawn" <khawn8@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Looks like I've got a bad wire. My perimeter box works for
        > the back
        > > > > > yard but not the front. Could someone tell me if the voltage
        > meter
        > > > > > below will work to find a broken wire? Looks like it checks 0-200
        > > > > volts.
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/Digital-Volt-Meter-DC-Current-Multi-Tester-No-
        > > > >
        > Reserve_W0QQitemZ150019326665QQihZ005QQcategoryZ42291QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewIt
        > > > > em
        > > > > >
        > > > > > thanks,
        > > > > > Ken
        > > > > >
        > > > > It looks like this meter only reads DC volts. I beleive the
        > perimeter
        > > > > wire signal is 5 volts AC.
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Dan Barclay
        ... Yup, that s what I m saying. AC only means that it s Alternating Current, not Direct Current. There are all kinds of AC. It s AC, but don t assume that
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: RoboMower@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RoboMower@yahoogroups.com] On
          > Behalf Of khawn


          > OK. Now I am confused. All Batteries use DC power. Are you saying
          > that my perimeter box is changing the current to AC?

          Yup, that's what I'm saying.

          AC only means that it's Alternating Current, not Direct Current. There are
          all kinds of AC. It's AC, but don't assume that it's turned into your
          normal house current.

          There are also all sorts of AC meters. Most of them are designed for
          50/60Hz household current, so it's possible to get one without enough
          frequency range to read anything.

          Again, if you're trying to figure out how to find a wire break you'll find
          some good procedures in messages here. Below is a procedure I posted
          sometime last year. There are also other methods posted somewhere that
          don't require a tone generator.

          Dan

          =======================================

          Iggy,

          I had some landscapers that cut my perimeter wire in two places! They
          weren't even places they should have been digging. I think they play with
          their shovels, poking them in the ground.

          I used a tone generator and tone detector. You can get one at Home Depot or
          any electronics store where phone/network install equipment is sold. It is
          really for identifying wires. You put the tone generator on one end of the
          wire and use the wand to check a bundle of wires to identify the one with
          the tone on it.

          I have that kind of tool around anyway. They're not cheap, but they are
          well under $100. Go to www.homedepot.com and enter "701k" in the search
          field for an example. If you have a friend who does phone or network work
          he'll likely have one you can borrow for a few minutes.

          Here is what I did:

          1. Unplug the perimeter wire connector from the perimeter switch.
          2. Connect the tone generator to *one* of the perimeter wire ends.
          3. Use the tone pickup wand to confirm you have tone on the connected
          wire, and no tone on the other wire.
          4. You will be tempted to follow the tone wire to look for the break. A
          much faster way to find it is to walk across the yard and check for tone
          about half way around the perimeter.
          5. If you have tone at that location, walk to a point about half way into
          the remainder of the wire and check. If you don't have tone, back up half
          way to the start.

          Continue to check until you narrow the length of wire down and you can find
          the break quickly.

          Dan

          ============================
          > I need a link to find a tone generator.

          Go to www.homedepot.com and enter "701k" in the search field (top of the
          screen, right hand side). I could post the link I get but the link is
          specific to the session so they can keep up with your shopping cart. Here's
          the description:

          "Progressive Electronics
          Classic Tone & Probe Kit
          Model 701K"

          Use the procedure I posted earlier. Connecting just one wire of the
          generator to the probe works fine, but if you want you can clip the other
          wire on the metal docking station stake.

          > I believe Tyler's "old school way" is to strip points on the perimeter
          > wire and jump another wire across to another point until your
          > transmitter will show a completed circuit. This is how RoboMower
          > documentation solves it. It's not too much fun if you've had a
          > lighting strike to a zone, though (with multiple breaks)!

          That would work well also, but the tone generator is completely unintrusive.
          No wire to drag around, no nicks left in the wire and it only takes a second
          to test a location.

          Downside it's about $85, but everybody should already have one<g>.

          Dan
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