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Simplicity and Self-Understanding 1/15

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  • John Zavrel
    Dear friends, I was thinking about with what topic we should start the New Year 2001. Should we continue with excerpts from Swami Veda s lectures, OR should I
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 4, 2001
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      Dear friends,

      I was thinking about with what topic we should start the New Year
      2001. Should we continue with excerpts from Swami Veda's lectures, OR
      should I introduce you to a highly interesting talk given by Swami
      Veda's leading disciple, the young, energetic and inspiring Pandit
      Dabral from Calgary?

      Finally, I remembered Swamiji's famous saying, "if you have to choose
      between two opposing courses, choose both." --"Should I do this, or
      should I do that?" 'Yes." -- "Is he right or is he wrong?" "Yes."

      So I decided to take his advice, and chose YES for both options.

      One day of the week we will have an excerpt from Swami Veda's
      lecture, which he gave in Minneapolis, MN on June 5, 1998.

      The second excerpt of the week will be of Pandit Dabral's inspiring
      talk on the BHAGAVAD-GITA.

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      Simplicity and Self-Understanding 1/15
      by Swami Veda Bharati


      All the minds, for while, for about 25 or 30 minutes, each and
      every mind thinking exactly the same thought.

      As though for those moments the minds have all been pooled together.
      If the world's minds could be pooled together thus, once a day,
      what a world this would be!

      Forget about the world.

      How about a single nation?

      A state. Or just one town or village?

      We can make a start with just family or friends.

      And I assure you, that when the conflicting minds thus become
      harmonized in sharing the stillness even for 5 minutes, the
      individual peace that you seek and elusive ideal of world peace that we
      all try to pursue, both of those can be achieved.

      When I was living here in Minneapolis, I used to advise people to
      form little neighborhood meditation groups, and I suggested that the
      groups meditate together.

      Everybody did not have to come to the Meditation Center.

      They could meditate in somebody's basement in their own
      neighborhood.

      And there were many, many groups throughout Minneapolis and St. Paul
      at that time.

      Then I suggested an even easier way.

      There are two kinds of group meditations: One in which people meet at
      the same place and at the same time.

      The other is that people meet, not necessarily at the same place, but
      at the same time.

      So five of you, ten of you, friends, family members, agree with each
      other: "We cannot meet every day personally in one place.

      Let's organize it this way: Every day at 6:00 a.m. we'll
      sit. Once a week we can give each other a call."

      But you will not even need to give that call because after a while
      you will sense the unity of the minds.

      You will sense the field being created.

      And if one person is missing, you will see that something is missing
      from the field.

      Learn to bury your hatchets that way.

      You can bring people close to each other that way.

      It's been tried.

      And whenever this has been tried in the history of the world, those
      areas where such attempts were made did enjoy social, national and
      international peace.


      An excerpt rom Swami Veda Bharati's lecture.

      zavrel@...
      January 4, 2001
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