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Yoga Psychology 1/5

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  • zavrel@meaus.com
    This selection and the next four selections are from a talk given to teachers in training by Swami Veda at the Meditation Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 7, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      This selection and the next four selections are from a talk given to teachers in training by
      Swami Veda at the Meditation Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the Summer of 1983.
      They all deal with "cultivating positive emotions" as part of yoga psychology. Those that are
      interested in this topic might save them for the next five days and then read all five together
      as a unit. They will be numbered Yoga Psychology # 1, Yoga Psychology # 2, and so forth
      up to Yoga Psychology # 5.

      "Yoga Psychology" #1
      When we use the word "psychology," we don't use it in the reductionist sense - "My
      relationship with my mother caused it" - that kind of thing, you know. "Maybe if you talked
      with my mother, that would help me." That is not what we mean. Rather we are talking
      about the states of mind that we have cultivated. You see, when an incident "x" occurs in
      your life, there is no mechanically predetermined response "y" which you must always give.
      People say, "Well, I am this way because incident "x" occurred, implying that for "x" there is
      fixed response "y". And that becomes an excuse-making, rationalizing justification for the
      response that we choose. But, you see, we also have "y1", "y2","y3" and "y4", and also "z1"
      and "z2" and "z3" and "z4", and all the letters from "a" to "z", and all the possible algebraic
      formulations you can give, and so we must not use the Freudian-Jungian analytic methods
      so completely that we are slaves to them - that we are slaves to the incident "x" that
      occurred, because person A in the face of the same incident "x" will respond one way and
      person B will respond in a different way. And person A at one time will respond one way,
      and at a different time will respond in a different way.
    • zavrel@meaus.com
      This selection and the next four selections are from a talk given to teachers in training by Swami Veda at the Meditation Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 7, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        This selection and the next four selections are from a talk given to teachers in training by Swami Veda at the Meditation Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the Summer of 1983.
        They all deal with "cultivating positive emotions" as part of yoga psychology. They will be numbered Yoga Psychology # 1, Yoga Psychology # 2, and so forth
        up to Yoga Psychology # 5.


        "Yoga Psychology" #1

        When we use the word "psychology," we don't use it in the reductionist sense - "My relationship with my mother caused it" - that kind of thing, you know.

        "Maybe if you talked with my mother, that would help me." That is not what we mean. Rather we are talking about the states of mind that we have cultivated. You see, when an incident "x" occurs in your life, there is no mechanically predetermined response "y" which you must always give.

        People say, "Well, I am this way because incident "x" occurred, implying that for "x" there is fixed response "y". And that becomes an excuse-making, rationalizing justification for the response that we choose.

        But, you see, we also have "y1", "y2","y3" and "y4", and also "z1" and "z2" and "z3" and "z4", and all the letters from "a" to "z", and all the possible algebraic formulations you can give, and so we must not use the Freudian-Jungian analytic methods so completely that we are slaves to them - that we are slaves to the incident "x" that occurred, because person A in the face of the same incident "x" will respond one way and person B will respond in a different way.

        And person A at one time will respond one way, and at a different time will respond in a different way.
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