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Re: [Revlist] Thanks and a New Question About Indians

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  • bobjinpa@comcast.net
    Hi again Mike - I am very backed up with getting my new home ready for my move in two weeks and, of course, all my books and notes are scattered and packed.
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 31, 2007
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      Hi again Mike -
      I am very backed up with getting my new home ready for my move in two weeks and, of course, all my books and notes are scattered and packed.
      But some things I can offer include:
      Virginia early on set up reservations for its Amerindian inhabitants and many still exist. Most of the tribes have websites - search on Virginia AND Indians. I think many of the remaining reservations are in the Northern Neck area. There is also at least one big pow wow fest, but cannot remember when or where.
      There were few if any non-reservation Amerindians in what is now the state of VA. The Shenandoah hadn't had any Amerindians since about 1600 when bands of Shawnees? left for Ohio.
      WV was mostly empty and most of KY was not home to any tribal groups.
      Ohio, Indiana and Illinois were home to a number of tribes including Mingoes (Hurons), Maumees, Shawnee, Delawares (most recent immigrants), others that I cannot recall off hand.
      During the first couple of years in particular of the FIW, raids nearly emptied the Shenandoah and South Potomac valleys of colonists.
      I wish I could add more at this time.
      Bob Johnson
      York PA

      -------------- Original message --------------
      From: umfspock87@...
      Dear List,

      Thank you to everyone who chimed in on my camp follower question. I got some great tips about sources. I found Todd Post's reference to John Rees's articles on camp followers in the Brigade Dispatch and Continental Soldier particularly helpful. I've pasted a draft of what I've gleaned from my reading. It's probably a lot shorter than some expected ( or would like ), but my intention was to briefly mention camp followers, not write in detail about them.

      That brings me to one more question. I've reached a point in my writing where I feel compelled to discuss the role of Virginia's slaves/free blacks, and women in the Revolution, and the impact of the Revolution on them. There is one more group I want to focus on... Virginia's Indian population. I know almost nothing about Virginia's Indians and would appreciate some advice regarding good sources. It seems to me that by the time of the Revolution, the Indian populations that existed in the state were probably west of the mountains. Complicating a discussion about

      The Revolution's Impact on Virginia's Indians,

      is that I'm not really sure what constitutes "Virginia's Indians". I mean, Virginia claimed a lot of land out west, so I guess I'll base the discussion on the Indians that fell within that area... Kentucky, Tennesee, Ohio, West Virginia (of course) and Indiana and Illinois.

      Once again though, this discussion is meant to be brief and broad. Basically a few accurate generalizations about the war's impact on the Indians. Again, I know next to nothing about this topic and would appreciate some input and advice about sources. I'd really like to read about this from both points of view. The discussion a few weeks ago about Gary Nash's perspective on History got me thinking about alternative views of the Revolution.

      In any case, thanks again for the help on camp followers. I look forward to your input on the topic of Virginia's Indians.

      Thanks,

      Mike Cecere 7th VA

      __________________________________________
      DRAFT on camp followers

      Not all women dutifully tended the home front during the war. Some followed their loved ones to the army and became camp followers. They bore many of the challenges of army life alongside their men folk. Although they were relegated to march with the baggage train in the rear of the column when the army was on the move, some women were known to share a tent with their husband or partner and his mess mates in camp.36 This practice was not necessarily sanctioned by the army, which, in at least one instance, assigned a tent for every six women in the army.37
      Camp followers performed a number of important tasks and received a daily ration for their service. They washed and mended the soldiers clothing, nursed the sick and injured, and occasionally cooked for the troops. Some of these hardy women faced the difficulties of army life with the additional burden of children. In 1777, General Washington complained about the strain that women with children placed on the army.

      The multitude of women in particular, especially those who are pregnant, or have children, are a clog upon every movement.38

      Officers were urged to, ���use every reasonable method in their power to get rid of [the women who were] not absolutely necessary.39 This proved impossible to do, and hundreds of women, including scores of Virginians, remained with the army throughout the war.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Chuck Hudson
      There are NO federal reservation in VA and only 2 state reservations. One is the Mattaponi Reservation which is East of Richmond near West Point, VA. The other
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
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        There are NO federal reservation in VA and only 2 state
        reservations. One is the Mattaponi Reservation which is East of
        Richmond near West Point, VA. The other is the Pamunkey Reservation
        which is between Richmond and Williamsburg near King William, VA.
        These are the only 2 reservation that I am aware that the
        Commonwealth of Virginia ever set up and as you can see they only
        included 2 of the tribes.

        There are 8 state recognized tribes in Virginia (none of them
        currently federally recognized) all but one of them are located east
        of a north/south line drawn through Richmond. The one tribe west of
        Richmond is the Monacan Nation whoose headquarters is at Bear
        Mountain, in Amherst County.

        Chuck Hudson



        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, bobjinpa@... wrote:
        >
        > Hi again Mike -
        > I am very backed up with getting my new home ready for my
        move in two weeks and, of course, all my books and notes are
        scattered and packed.
        > But some things I can offer include:
        > Virginia early on set up reservations for its Amerindian
        inhabitants and many still exist. Most of the tribes have websites -
        search on Virginia AND Indians. I think many of the remaining
        reservations are in the Northern Neck area. There is also at least
        one big pow wow fest, but cannot remember when or where.
        > There were few if any non-reservation Amerindians in what is
        now the state of VA. The Shenandoah hadn't had any Amerindians
        since about 1600 when bands of Shawnees? left for Ohio.
        > WV was mostly empty and most of KY was not home to any tribal
        groups.
        > Ohio, Indiana and Illinois were home to a number of tribes
        including Mingoes (Hurons), Maumees, Shawnee, Delawares (most recent
        immigrants), others that I cannot recall off hand.
        > During the first couple of years in particular of the FIW,
        raids nearly emptied the Shenandoah and South Potomac valleys of
        colonists.
        > I wish I could add more at this time.
        > Bob Johnson
        > York PA
        >
        > -------------- Original message --------------
        > From: umfspock87@...
        > Dear List,
        >
        > Thank you to everyone who chimed in on my camp follower question.
        I got some great tips about sources. I found Todd Post's reference
        to John Rees's articles on camp followers in the Brigade Dispatch
        and Continental Soldier particularly helpful. I've pasted a draft of
        what I've gleaned from my reading. It's probably a lot shorter than
        some expected ( or would like ), but my intention was to briefly
        mention camp followers, not write in detail about them.
        >
        > That brings me to one more question. I've reached a point in my
        writing where I feel compelled to discuss the role of Virginia's
        slaves/free blacks, and women in the Revolution, and the impact of
        the Revolution on them. There is one more group I want to focus
        on... Virginia's Indian population. I know almost nothing about
        Virginia's Indians and would appreciate some advice regarding good
        sources. It seems to me that by the time of the Revolution, the
        Indian populations that existed in the state were probably west of
        the mountains. Complicating a discussion about
        >
        > The Revolution's Impact on Virginia's Indians,
        >
        > is that I'm not really sure what constitutes "Virginia's Indians".
        I mean, Virginia claimed a lot of land out west, so I guess I'll
        base the discussion on the Indians that fell within that area...
        Kentucky, Tennesee, Ohio, West Virginia (of course) and Indiana and
        Illinois.
        >
        > Once again though, this discussion is meant to be brief and broad.
        Basically a few accurate generalizations about the war's impact on
        the Indians. Again, I know next to nothing about this topic and
        would appreciate some input and advice about sources. I'd really
        like to read about this from both points of view. The discussion a
        few weeks ago about Gary Nash's perspective on History got me
        thinking about alternative views of the Revolution.
        >
        > In any case, thanks again for the help on camp followers. I look
        forward to your input on the topic of Virginia's Indians.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Mike Cecere 7th VA
        >
        > __________________________________________
        > DRAFT on camp followers
        >
        > Not all women dutifully tended the home front during the war. Some
        followed their loved ones to the army and became camp followers.
        They bore many of the challenges of army life alongside their men
        folk. Although they were relegated to march with the baggage train
        in the rear of the column when the army was on the move, some women
        were known to share a tent with their husband or partner and his
        mess mates in camp.36 This practice was not necessarily sanctioned
        by the army, which, in at least one instance, assigned a tent for
        every six women in the army.37
        > Camp followers performed a number of important tasks and received
        a daily ration for their service. They washed and mended the
        soldiers clothing, nursed the sick and injured, and occasionally
        cooked for the troops. Some of these hardy women faced the
        difficulties of army life with the additional burden of children. In
        1777, General Washington complained about the strain that women with
        children placed on the army.
        >
        > The multitude of women in particular, especially those who are
        pregnant, or have children, are a clog upon every movement.38
        >
        > Officers were urged to, “use every reasonable method in their
        power to get rid of [the women who were] not absolutely necessary.39
        This proved impossible to do, and hundreds of women, including
        scores of Virginians, remained with the army throughout the war.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Chris E.
        Hey Lt. Mike...does this mean we can stay?? Chris E Hampton, VA ... a daily ration for their service. They washed and mended the soldiers clothing, nursed the
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1, 2007
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          Hey Lt. Mike...does this mean we can stay??

          Chris E
          Hampton, VA

          >...
          > Camp followers performed a number of important tasks and received
          a daily ration for their service. They washed and mended the
          soldiers clothing, nursed the sick and injured, and occasionally
          cooked for the troops. Some of these hardy women faced the
          difficulties of army life with the additional burden of children. In
          1777, General Washington complained about the strain that women with
          children placed on the army.
          > ..

          38. Officers were urged to, use every reasonable method in their
          power to get rid of [the women who were] not absolutely necessary.

          39. This proved impossible to do, and hundreds of women, including
          scores of Virginians, remained with the army throughout the war.
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