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Re: Brigades in the army 1777

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  • Patrick O'Kelley
    Howdy, ... the ... to ... I ... to ... Heck no, what fun is that! Besides, information on the list may be new to some folks. I have read the fighting-est
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 1, 2007
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      Howdy,

      > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the composition of
      the
      > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help as
      to
      > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated. All
      I
      > can seem to ind is a list of briagdes at Valley Forge. So as not
      to
      > clutter the lsit you can respond off-list.

      Heck no, what fun is that! Besides, information on the list may
      be new to some folks.
      I have read the "fighting-est" brigade comments and such. I guess
      in the long run it all depends on where you stand during the
      battles. You could be a member of the "most fighting" brigade, and
      do nothing but guard an artillery piece. Also Washington's army
      didn't do much fighting until the very end of the summer of 1777.
      This was when the Burgoyne was concentrating on coming down from
      Canada.
      Now, onto the composition of us, the North Carolinians. You asked
      about units with Washington's army in the summer of 1777. We arrived
      up there at the end of summer, but don't believe most of what you
      read in the history books. Most books write that the North Carolina
      Brigade, under Nash, consisted of the 9 regiments of the North
      Carolina line. This is technically true, but they were not set up as
      9 regiments. It was more of an ad hoc organization, that had members
      from all 9 regiments in them.
      It took awhile for the North Carolinians to get from down South to
      up there. They started moving that way in February 1777. There was
      a stop in middle, such as Alexandria, Virginia, to be inoculated.
      This took a little time. There was also a stop, such as
      Philadelphia, to outfit them more suitably. By July Nash's brigade
      was in New Jersey.
      Because they arrived at two different times, there were Nash's
      Brigade with Washington at Morristown, and then there was the 3rd
      regiment under Sumner that was attached to Muhlenberg's Virginians.
      In August all the North Carolinians were together again, but none of
      the regiments were at regimental strength. So the organization
      within the brigade was a composite group of all 9 regiments.
      The real fighting started at the end of August, and a company of
      North Carolina "light infantry" was placed with Maxwell, and fought
      at Cooch's Bridge. These men were also with Maxwell at Brandywine,
      on the enemy side of the creek, to slow them down.
      Nash's brigade was with Greene's division, and during the fight
      they had to run four miles, in 45 minutes, and reinforce the line.
      Nash's North Carolinians were left of Muhlenberg's Virginians. They
      then had the non-enviable job of having to take on the entire British
      army while everyone else left the field.
      The British grenadiers met this line, not expecting such a stiff
      defense, and had to withdraw. Jagers came around the flanks and
      poured fire into the ranks. At one point the North Carolinians were
      within 50 yards of the British line, ready to go toe to toe with the
      bayonet. The firepower of both kept them at that "safe" distance.
      They fought for 45 minutes until Greene realized that he was about to
      be flanked and overrun. They were the last to leave the field. They
      retreated back to Dilworth, and formed a half moon perimeter that
      stopped the British advance up the road.
      On the other side of the field Maxwell's lights, with the company
      of North Carolinians, were with Wayne, trying to figure out what to
      do with all those cannons that were about to be captured. They then
      bumped into two battalions of Guards that had got lost in the
      battle. They abandoned the guns and went up the road.
      The North Carolinians had seven killed and four captured during
      the hand to hand fight in the cornfield. Captain James Gee, of the
      2nd North Carolina, was mortally wounded and died later.
      This was pretty much the only real fight in the summer of 1777
      with Washington's army. There was the non-battle of Goshen, that got
      rained out, but it didn't count. Germantown would be a few weeks
      later, but it was not in the summer. At Germantown the North
      Carolina brigade would lose its General, Francis Nash. They would
      also lose Lieutenant Colonel Henry Irwin, Captain Jacob Turner,
      Captain Benjamin Pike, and Lieutenant David Lucas. This was just the
      officers, and within the ranks there were dozens of killed and
      wounded. So as to "fighting-est", I guess the men who were killed
      standing their ground can attest to that.
      The organization of the North Carolina Brigade at this time is a
      bit of a mystery. There are the nine regiments of North Carolina in
      the returns of Nash's Brigade. The officers of all nine regiments
      are mentioned at the battle of Germantown in October. The men who
      were in the North Carolina Regiments had enlisted in January 1776 for
      30 months. Their enlistments would end in June of 1778. The total
      of the nine regiments was only about 1,000 men. A standard regiment
      at that time would be 500 men, in ten 50-man companies, so each
      regiment was only a shadow of what it should have been. Maxwell's
      Light Infantry had taken away 100 of the North Carolinians, and
      sickness and wounds reduced Nash's Brigade by another 300 men.
      Nash's Brigade was organized into three battalions, and those
      battalions were made up of all nine of the regiments. They were
      consolidated for command and control, and firepower. Throughout the
      battle they are only mentioned as Nash's Brigade, and they are not
      mentioned by any smaller regimental designations. The North
      Carolinians were fighting as just North Carolinians, and not as the
      1st or 2nd North Carolina or any other regimental designation.

      Patrick O'Kelley http://www.2nc.org/
      Author of "Nothing but Blood and Slaughter" The Revolutionary War in
      the Carolinas
      Volume One 1771-1779 http://www.booklocker.com/books/1469.html
      Volume Two 1780 http://www.booklocker.com/books/1707.html
      Volume Three 1781
      http://www.booklocker.com/books/1965.html
      Volume Four 1782
      http://www.booklocker.com/books/2167.html
      "Unwaried Patience and Fortitude" Francis Marion's Orderly Book 1775-
      1782
      http://www.bbotw.com/description.asp?ISBN=0-7414-3666-3
    • frostfree12
      Matthew, Have you taken a look at http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm This is taken almost completely from Wright s book. An important
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 1, 2007
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        Matthew,

        Have you taken a look at

        http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm

        This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.

        An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little attention
        to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY that were
        drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777 Establishment. I've
        seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no direct
        knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the 1st
        NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
        Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some militia
        draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there around
        Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not clear
        from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to mention this
        part of his career.

        I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because of
        material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture of my
        ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in March
        1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
        overall Continental picture at this time.

        Good luck,
        Judy

        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@...> wrote:
        >
        > List,
        >
        > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the composition of
        the
        > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help as to
        > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
      • Glenn Williams
        Matthew and Judy, Drafting, or draughting, levies from the militia by states to bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength levels for a
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 1, 2007
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          Matthew and Judy,

          Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states to bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength levels for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies" or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades, sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done in every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick explanation, and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may be why Wright and others have not included it.

          Best Regards,

          Glenn

          frostfree12 <frostfree12@...> wrote:
          Matthew,

          Have you taken a look at

          http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm

          This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.

          An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little attention
          to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY that were
          drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777 Establishment. I've
          seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no direct
          knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the 1st
          NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
          Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some militia
          draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there around
          Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not clear
          from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to mention this
          part of his career.

          I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because of
          material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture of my
          ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in March
          1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
          overall Continental picture at this time.

          Good luck,
          Judy

          --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@...> wrote:
          >
          > List,
          >
          > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the composition of
          the
          > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help as to
          > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.






          ---------------------------------
          Get your own web address.
          Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mike Barbieri
          ... because of ... my ... Judy and other interested parties, Here s a bit about that incident that I have noted: 23 Mar: [Col Anthony Wayne to Schuyler after
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 1, 2007
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            --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "frostfree12" <frostfree12@...> wrote:
            >
            > . . . I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga
            because of
            > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture of
            my
            > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in March
            > 1777. . . .

            Judy and other interested parties,

            Here's a bit about that incident that I have noted:

            23 Mar: [Col Anthony Wayne to Schuyler after skirmish between
            Capt.Baldwin of Stillwater Rangers & Indians at Sabbath-day Point] "I
            have sent Capt. Whitcomb with a party of Rangers, to bury the dead."
            [Jared Sparks,Corres.;v.1,387]

            29 Mar: [extract of a letter dated Albany, 3/29 and printed in
            the "Continental Journal" 4/10]:
            "About a week ago the famous McCay (who broke out of Hartford Goal
            last September and made his escape) with a party of Indians attack'd
            thirty odd unarmed recruits with two officers, at Sabbath-day-point,
            a little before day, as they were asleep round a fire; they were on
            their way from Ticonderoga to Fort George to join their corps. They
            tomahawked four of the men on the spot and fired a ball through the
            upper part of the breast of Capt. Henry, of which he is getting
            better. Capt. Whitcomb with 40 men was dispatch'd as soon as the
            account reached Ticonderoga with a design to fall in with the enemy
            on their way to Canada, and I am just now informed he succeeded in
            his plan, and has kiled several of the Indians and wounded several
            more: I hope it may be true. Only two of the party, beside the
            wounded officer, got clear of the Savages, the remainder that were
            not killed were taken prisoners."

            Apr: [James Rankins pension app.] "That when he and his company left
            Tyconderoga, which occured in the latter part of the winter of the
            years 1776 and 1777. They were ordered, he believes, to Albany, and
            when they arrived on this journey, to a place called Saboda Point on
            Lake George about midway between Fort George and Tyconderoga, they
            were surprised and attacked by a band of Indians and Canadians
            commanded by one Captain McCoy: an engagement ensued and Rankins and
            about 25 or 30 others were taken prisoners and four others killed and
            the remainder of the company escaped. Rankins and the other prisoners
            were taken to Montreal, and in performing that journey at that
            season, suffered extremely from fatigue and want of food and of the
            number one perished on the way. He (Rankins) was for a long time (he
            cannot state the length of time) confined in prison in Montreal and
            until an exchange of prisoners took place, he did not get an
            opportunity to escape, being closely watched and remained in Canada
            until the close of the war."

            Mike Barbieri
            Whitcomb's Corps
          • ju_rees18938
            The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months) began in 1777 and
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 2, 2007
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              The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
              Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
              began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.

              In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
              augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
              general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states (SC
              and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9 month
              draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men. (One
              result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
              of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
              Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
              poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
              good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
              New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
              units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served with
              Lee's Advance force of picked men.

              The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-year
              basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
              state and year-by-year.

              For details see:

              "'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
              Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
              Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
              1778 Recruiting Acts"
              Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
              Jersey Service Narratives"
              Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged …": New Jersey,
              Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy Narratives"
              ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4 (Winter
              2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.

              Cheers,

              John Rees





              --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Matthew and Judy,
              >
              > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states to
              bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength levels
              for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
              all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
              or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
              enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
              called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
              sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
              entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
              service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
              the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done in
              every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick explanation,
              and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
              be why Wright and others have not included it.
              >
              > Best Regards,
              >
              > Glenn
              >
              > frostfree12 <frostfree12@...> wrote:
              > Matthew,
              >
              > Have you taken a look at
              >
              > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
              >
              > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
              >
              > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
              attention
              > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY that
              were
              > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777 Establishment.
              I've
              > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
              direct
              > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
              1st
              > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
              > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some militia
              > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
              around
              > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
              clear
              > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to mention
              this
              > part of his career.
              >
              > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because of
              > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture of
              my
              > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in March
              > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
              > overall Continental picture at this time.
              >
              > Good luck,
              > Judy
              >
              > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
              wrote:
              > >
              > > List,
              > >
              > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the composition of
              > the
              > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help as
              to
              > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Get your own web address.
              > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • frostfree12
              Mike, Thanks for this. I published the journal of Capt. McCay / McKay concerning his expedition, abstracts of the interrogation reports [these items from the
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 2, 2007
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                Mike,

                Thanks for this. I published the journal of Capt. McCay / McKay
                concerning his expedition, abstracts of the interrogation reports
                [these items from the Haldimand Papers] and material from the
                relevant Pension Application files of some of the survivors, in the
                New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 122, No's. 1 and
                2 for Jan. and April 1991.

                Somehow I managed at that time to miss finding James Rankins (Jr.)'s
                pension application file; the main declaration for pension from his
                file has been posted on the Rootsweb USGenWeb site for Montgomery
                Co., NY (or is it on Herkimer? I have forgotten--but it's in there
                somewhere). He told the captors that he'd been "forced to enlist by
                the Rebels to go instead of his father, who was an old Soldier in the
                British Service, to Tyconderoga." But it appears that his father was
                James Rankins Sr. in Capt. Finck's Co., 1st NY (Continental) and
                mustered through 1777 and into 1778. And it looks like James Jr. had
                been in Capt. Marc Demouth's Co., 3rd Tyron Co. militia Regiment,
                which was one of the 'Ranger Companies' drafted into the Continentals.

                Capt. Alexander Baldwin was actually of the Albany Co. Rangers. His
                original Commission was captured and is among the documents included
                Haldimand Papers as well. Others of the captives were indeed from
                Stillwater.

                Those taken in this incident and surrounding events were a motley
                crew.

                Good hunting,
                Judy


                --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Barbieri" <ottercreek@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "frostfree12" <frostfree12@> wrote:
                > >
                > > . . . I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga
                > because of
                > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture
                of
                > my
                > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in
                March
                > > 1777. . . .
                >
                > Judy and other interested parties,
                >
                > Here's a bit about that incident that I have noted:
                >
                > 23 Mar: [Col Anthony Wayne to Schuyler [snip]> [Jared
                Sparks,Corres.;v.1,387]
                >
                > 29 Mar: [extract of a letter dated Albany, 3/29 and printed in
                > the "Continental Journal" 4/10]:
                > "About a week ago the famous McCay (who broke out of Hartford Goal
                > last September and made his escape) with a party of Indians
                attack'd
                > thirty odd unarmed recruits with two officers[snip]>

                > Apr: [James Rankins pension app.] "That when he and his company
                left
                > Tyconderoga, which occured in the latter part of the winter of the
                > years 1776 and 1777. They were ordered, he believes, to Albany, and
                > when they arrived on this journey, to a place called Saboda Point
                on Lake George [snip]>

                > Mike Barbieri
                > Whitcomb's Corps
                >
              • Jack Sherry
                Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia began much earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall that
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 2, 2007
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                  Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia began much
                  earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall that
                  periodically the minutemen were drawn from the ranks of the existing militia
                  to serve for a limited time.
                  Regards,
                  Jack Sherry
                  4th Battn. NJV
                  Ben Franklin
                  High School History Teacher


                  >From: "ju_rees18938" <ju_rees@...>
                  >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now: Continental Army
                  >drafts
                  >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 21:14:48 -0000
                  >
                  >
                  >The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
                  >Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
                  >began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.
                  >
                  >In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
                  >augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
                  >general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states (SC
                  >and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9 month
                  >draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men. (One
                  >result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
                  >of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
                  >Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
                  >poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
                  >good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
                  >New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
                  >units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served with
                  >Lee's Advance force of picked men.
                  >
                  >The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-year
                  >basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
                  >state and year-by-year.
                  >
                  >For details see:
                  >
                  >"'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
                  >Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
                  >Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
                  >1778 Recruiting Acts"
                  >Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
                  >Jersey Service Narratives"
                  >Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged �": New Jersey,
                  >Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy Narratives"
                  >ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4 (Winter
                  >2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.
                  >
                  >Cheers,
                  >
                  >John Rees
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >--- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@...>
                  >wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Matthew and Judy,
                  > >
                  > > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states to
                  >bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength levels
                  >for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
                  >all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
                  >or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
                  >enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
                  >called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
                  >sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
                  >entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
                  >service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
                  >the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done in
                  >every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick explanation,
                  >and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
                  >be why Wright and others have not included it.
                  > >
                  > > Best Regards,
                  > >
                  > > Glenn
                  > >
                  > > frostfree12 <frostfree12@...> wrote:
                  > > Matthew,
                  > >
                  > > Have you taken a look at
                  > >
                  > > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
                  > >
                  > > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
                  > >
                  > > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
                  >attention
                  > > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY that
                  >were
                  > > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777 Establishment.
                  >I've
                  > > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
                  >direct
                  > > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
                  >1st
                  > > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
                  > > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some militia
                  > > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
                  >around
                  > > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
                  >clear
                  > > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to mention
                  >this
                  > > part of his career.
                  > >
                  > > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because of
                  > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture of
                  >my
                  > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in March
                  > > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
                  > > overall Continental picture at this time.
                  > >
                  > > Good luck,
                  > > Judy
                  > >
                  > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
                  >wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > List,
                  > > >
                  > > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the composition of
                  > > the
                  > > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help as
                  >to
                  > > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ---------------------------------
                  > > Get your own web address.
                  > > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >

                  _________________________________________________________________
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                • Jack Sherry
                  Oh and by the way the use of minutemen predates the Revolution. Jack ... _________________________________________________________________ Laugh, share and
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 2, 2007
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                    Oh and by the way the use of minutemen predates the Revolution.
                    Jack


                    >From: "Jack Sherry" <jsherry49@...>
                    >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    >Subject: RE: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now: Continental
                    >Army drafts
                    >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 20:25:09 -0500
                    >
                    >Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia began much
                    >earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall that
                    >periodically the minutemen were drawn from the ranks of the existing
                    >militia
                    >to serve for a limited time.
                    >Regards,
                    >Jack Sherry
                    >4th Battn. NJV
                    >Ben Franklin
                    >High School History Teacher
                    >
                    >
                    > >From: "ju_rees18938" <ju_rees@...>
                    > >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    > >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    > >Subject: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now: Continental Army
                    > >drafts
                    > >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 21:14:48 -0000
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
                    > >Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
                    > >began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.
                    > >
                    > >In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
                    > >augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
                    > >general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states (SC
                    > >and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9 month
                    > >draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men. (One
                    > >result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
                    > >of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
                    > >Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
                    > >poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
                    > >good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
                    > >New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
                    > >units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served with
                    > >Lee's Advance force of picked men.
                    > >
                    > >The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-year
                    > >basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
                    > >state and year-by-year.
                    > >
                    > >For details see:
                    > >
                    > >"'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
                    > >Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
                    > >Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
                    > >1778 Recruiting Acts"
                    > >Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
                    > >Jersey Service Narratives"
                    > >Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged �": New Jersey,
                    > >Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy Narratives"
                    > >ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4 (Winter
                    > >2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.
                    > >
                    > >Cheers,
                    > >
                    > >John Rees
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >--- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@...>
                    > >wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Matthew and Judy,
                    > > >
                    > > > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states to
                    > >bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength levels
                    > >for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
                    > >all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
                    > >or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
                    > >enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
                    > >called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
                    > >sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
                    > >entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
                    > >service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
                    > >the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done in
                    > >every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick explanation,
                    > >and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
                    > >be why Wright and others have not included it.
                    > > >
                    > > > Best Regards,
                    > > >
                    > > > Glenn
                    > > >
                    > > > frostfree12 <frostfree12@...> wrote:
                    > > > Matthew,
                    > > >
                    > > > Have you taken a look at
                    > > >
                    > > > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
                    > > >
                    > > > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
                    > > >
                    > > > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
                    > >attention
                    > > > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY that
                    > >were
                    > > > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777 Establishment.
                    > >I've
                    > > > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
                    > >direct
                    > > > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
                    > >1st
                    > > > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
                    > > > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some militia
                    > > > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
                    > >around
                    > > > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
                    > >clear
                    > > > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to mention
                    > >this
                    > > > part of his career.
                    > > >
                    > > > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because of
                    > > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British capture of
                    > >my
                    > > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in March
                    > > > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
                    > > > overall Continental picture at this time.
                    > > >
                    > > > Good luck,
                    > > > Judy
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
                    > >wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > List,
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the composition of
                    > > > the
                    > > > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help as
                    > >to
                    > > > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > ---------------------------------
                    > > > Get your own web address.
                    > > > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
                    > > >
                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >_________________________________________________________________
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                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList
                    >member photos, FAQ, etc., at
                    >
                    >http://www.liming.org/revlist/ or add your own links at
                    >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/
                    >
                    >To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
                    >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/ and click "Join This List."
                    >
                    >TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to
                    >Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.
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                    >
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                  • ju_rees18938
                    Hi Jack, Yes, all Revolutionary militia were drafted from the adult male population, but minutemen were still militia, not regular Continental Army troops
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 3, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Jack,

                      Yes, all Revolutionary militia were drafted from the adult male
                      population, but minutemen were still militia, not regular Continental
                      Army troops (they were after all, pre-Continental Army). I am
                      speaking of actually drafting militia troops for the regular army.
                      Two different beasts.

                      John




                      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Sherry" <jsherry49@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia
                      began much
                      > earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall
                      that
                      > periodically the minutemen were drawn from the ranks of the
                      existing militia
                      > to serve for a limited time.
                      > Regards,
                      > Jack Sherry
                      > 4th Battn. NJV
                      > Ben Franklin
                      > High School History Teacher
                      >
                      >
                      > >From: "ju_rees18938" <ju_rees@...>
                      > >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                      > >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                      > >Subject: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now:
                      Continental Army
                      > >drafts
                      > >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 21:14:48 -0000
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
                      > >Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
                      > >began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.
                      > >
                      > >In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
                      > >augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
                      > >general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states
                      (SC
                      > >and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9
                      month
                      > >draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men.
                      (One
                      > >result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
                      > >of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
                      > >Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
                      > >poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
                      > >good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
                      > >New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
                      > >units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served
                      with
                      > >Lee's Advance force of picked men.
                      > >
                      > >The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-
                      year
                      > >basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
                      > >state and year-by-year.
                      > >
                      > >For details see:
                      > >
                      > >"'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
                      > >Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
                      > >Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
                      > >1778 Recruiting Acts"
                      > >Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
                      > >Jersey Service Narratives"
                      > >Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged …": New Jersey,
                      > >Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy
                      Narratives"
                      > >ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4
                      (Winter
                      > >2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.
                      > >
                      > >Cheers,
                      > >
                      > >John Rees
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >--- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@>
                      > >wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Matthew and Judy,
                      > > >
                      > > > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states
                      to
                      > >bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength
                      levels
                      > >for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
                      > >all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
                      > >or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
                      > >enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
                      > >called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
                      > >sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
                      > >entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
                      > >service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
                      > >the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done
                      in
                      > >every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick
                      explanation,
                      > >and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
                      > >be why Wright and others have not included it.
                      > > >
                      > > > Best Regards,
                      > > >
                      > > > Glenn
                      > > >
                      > > > frostfree12 <frostfree12@> wrote:
                      > > > Matthew,
                      > > >
                      > > > Have you taken a look at
                      > > >
                      > > > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
                      > > >
                      > > > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
                      > > >
                      > > > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
                      > >attention
                      > > > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY
                      that
                      > >were
                      > > > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777
                      Establishment.
                      > >I've
                      > > > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
                      > >direct
                      > > > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
                      > >1st
                      > > > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
                      > > > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some
                      militia
                      > > > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
                      > >around
                      > > > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
                      > >clear
                      > > > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to
                      mention
                      > >this
                      > > > part of his career.
                      > > >
                      > > > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because
                      of
                      > > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British
                      capture of
                      > >my
                      > > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in
                      March
                      > > > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
                      > > > overall Continental picture at this time.
                      > > >
                      > > > Good luck,
                      > > > Judy
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
                      > >wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > List,
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the
                      composition of
                      > > > the
                      > > > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help
                      as
                      > >to
                      > > > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > ---------------------------------
                      > > > Get your own web address.
                      > > > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
                      > > >
                      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      > _________________________________________________________________
                      > Invite your Hotmail contacts to join your friends list with Windows
                      Live
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                    • Glenn Williams
                      John and jack, The minute companies lasted into the early year or so of the war. The Continental Congress resolved that each state should form 1/4 of its
                      Message 10 of 18 , Feb 5, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        John and jack,

                        The "minute companies" lasted into the early year or so of the war. The Continental Congress resolved that each state should form 1/4 of its militia into "minute companies" that could be quickly mustered for the defense of their own or a neighboring state. As John said, they were still militia and seperate from the Continental Army.

                        Glenn

                        ju_rees18938 <ju_rees@...> wrote:

                        Hi Jack,

                        Yes, all Revolutionary militia were drafted from the adult male
                        population, but minutemen were still militia, not regular Continental
                        Army troops (they were after all, pre-Continental Army). I am
                        speaking of actually drafting militia troops for the regular army.
                        Two different beasts.

                        John

                        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Sherry" <jsherry49@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia
                        began much
                        > earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall
                        that
                        > periodically the minutemen were drawn from the ranks of the
                        existing militia
                        > to serve for a limited time.
                        > Regards,
                        > Jack Sherry
                        > 4th Battn. NJV
                        > Ben Franklin
                        > High School History Teacher
                        >
                        >
                        > >From: "ju_rees18938" <ju_rees@...>
                        > >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                        > >Subject: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now:
                        Continental Army
                        > >drafts
                        > >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 21:14:48 -0000
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
                        > >Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
                        > >began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.
                        > >
                        > >In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
                        > >augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
                        > >general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states
                        (SC
                        > >and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9
                        month
                        > >draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men.
                        (One
                        > >result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
                        > >of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
                        > >Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
                        > >poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
                        > >good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
                        > >New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
                        > >units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served
                        with
                        > >Lee's Advance force of picked men.
                        > >
                        > >The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-
                        year
                        > >basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
                        > >state and year-by-year.
                        > >
                        > >For details see:
                        > >
                        > >"'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
                        > >Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
                        > >Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
                        > >1778 Recruiting Acts"
                        > >Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
                        > >Jersey Service Narratives"
                        > >Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged …": New Jersey,
                        > >Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy
                        Narratives"
                        > >ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4
                        (Winter
                        > >2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.
                        > >
                        > >Cheers,
                        > >
                        > >John Rees
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >--- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@>
                        > >wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Matthew and Judy,
                        > > >
                        > > > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states
                        to
                        > >bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength
                        levels
                        > >for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
                        > >all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
                        > >or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
                        > >enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
                        > >called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
                        > >sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
                        > >entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
                        > >service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
                        > >the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done
                        in
                        > >every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick
                        explanation,
                        > >and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
                        > >be why Wright and others have not included it.
                        > > >
                        > > > Best Regards,
                        > > >
                        > > > Glenn
                        > > >
                        > > > frostfree12 <frostfree12@> wrote:
                        > > > Matthew,
                        > > >
                        > > > Have you taken a look at
                        > > >
                        > > > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
                        > > >
                        > > > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
                        > > >
                        > > > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
                        > >attention
                        > > > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY
                        that
                        > >were
                        > > > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777
                        Establishment.
                        > >I've
                        > > > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
                        > >direct
                        > > > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
                        > >1st
                        > > > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
                        > > > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some
                        militia
                        > > > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
                        > >around
                        > > > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
                        > >clear
                        > > > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to
                        mention
                        > >this
                        > > > part of his career.
                        > > >
                        > > > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because
                        of
                        > > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British
                        capture of
                        > >my
                        > > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in
                        March
                        > > > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
                        > > > overall Continental picture at this time.
                        > > >
                        > > > Good luck,
                        > > > Judy
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
                        > >wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > List,
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the
                        composition of
                        > > > the
                        > > > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help
                        as
                        > >to
                        > > > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > ---------------------------------
                        > > > Get your own web address.
                        > > > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > __________________________________________________________
                        > Invite your Hotmail contacts to join your friends list with Windows
                        Live
                        > Spaces
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                      • Bruce Cobb
                        Liste, John, Jack, Glenn, When did the term minuteman come into being? Was it a period term or after? I have an almost ancestor that, in his Pension
                        Message 11 of 18 , Feb 5, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Liste, John, Jack, Glenn,

                          When did the term "minuteman" come into being? Was it a period term or after? I have an 'almost' ancestor that, in his Pension application, called himself a "minuteman." He was drafted several times, for short periods (months at a time), near the end of the war. His name was Aaron Depuy out of Springfield (now Stroudsburg) Pa.

                          Just curious,

                          Bruce

                          Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@...> wrote:
                          John and jack,

                          The "minute companies" lasted into the early year or so of the war. The Continental Congress resolved that each state should form 1/4 of its militia into "minute companies" that could be quickly mustered for the defense of their own or a neighboring state. As John said, they were still militia and seperate from the Continental Army.

                          Glenn

                          ju_rees18938 <ju_rees@...> wrote:

                          Hi Jack,

                          Yes, all Revolutionary militia were drafted from the adult male
                          population, but minutemen were still militia, not regular Continental
                          Army troops (they were after all, pre-Continental Army). I am
                          speaking of actually drafting militia troops for the regular army.
                          Two different beasts.

                          John

                          --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Sherry" <jsherry49@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia
                          began much
                          > earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall
                          that
                          > periodically the minutemen were drawn from the ranks of the
                          existing militia
                          > to serve for a limited time.
                          > Regards,
                          > Jack Sherry
                          > 4th Battn. NJV
                          > Ben Franklin
                          > High School History Teacher
                          >
                          >
                          > >From: "ju_rees18938" <ju_rees@...>
                          > >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                          > >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                          > >Subject: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now:
                          Continental Army
                          > >drafts
                          > >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 21:14:48 -0000
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
                          > >Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
                          > >began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.
                          > >
                          > >In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
                          > >augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
                          > >general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states
                          (SC
                          > >and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9
                          month
                          > >draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men.
                          (One
                          > >result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
                          > >of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
                          > >Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
                          > >poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
                          > >good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
                          > >New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
                          > >units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served
                          with
                          > >Lee's Advance force of picked men.
                          > >
                          > >The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-
                          year
                          > >basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
                          > >state and year-by-year.
                          > >
                          > >For details see:
                          > >
                          > >"'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
                          > >Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
                          > >Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
                          > >1778 Recruiting Acts"
                          > >Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
                          > >Jersey Service Narratives"
                          > >Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged …": New Jersey,
                          > >Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy
                          Narratives"
                          > >ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4
                          (Winter
                          > >2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.
                          > >
                          > >Cheers,
                          > >
                          > >John Rees
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >--- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@>
                          > >wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Matthew and Judy,
                          > > >
                          > > > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states
                          to
                          > >bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength
                          levels
                          > >for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
                          > >all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
                          > >or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
                          > >enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
                          > >called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
                          > >sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
                          > >entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
                          > >service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
                          > >the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done
                          in
                          > >every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick
                          explanation,
                          > >and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
                          > >be why Wright and others have not included it.
                          > > >
                          > > > Best Regards,
                          > > >
                          > > > Glenn
                          > > >
                          > > > frostfree12 <frostfree12@> wrote:
                          > > > Matthew,
                          > > >
                          > > > Have you taken a look at
                          > > >
                          > > > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
                          > > >
                          > > > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
                          > > >
                          > > > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
                          > >attention
                          > > > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY
                          that
                          > >were
                          > > > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777
                          Establishment.
                          > >I've
                          > > > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
                          > >direct
                          > > > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
                          > >1st
                          > > > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
                          > > > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some
                          militia
                          > > > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
                          > >around
                          > > > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
                          > >clear
                          > > > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to
                          mention
                          > >this
                          > > > part of his career.
                          > > >
                          > > > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because
                          of
                          > > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British
                          capture of
                          > >my
                          > > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in
                          March
                          > > > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
                          > > > overall Continental picture at this time.
                          > > >
                          > > > Good luck,
                          > > > Judy
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
                          > >wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > List,
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the
                          composition of
                          > > > the
                          > > > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help
                          as
                          > >to
                          > > > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > ---------------------------------
                          > > > Get your own web address.
                          > > > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
                          > > >
                          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          > __________________________________________________________
                          > Invite your Hotmail contacts to join your friends list with Windows
                          Live
                          > Spaces
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                          Bruce C. Cobb
                          Commander, 5th Pa Reg't Rifles, Oldham's Co.
                          Captain, Washington Crossing Boat Crew
                          Director, Moland House, Warwick Twp Historical Society
                          Treasurer, Historical Society of Lower Southampton Twp .
                          Pa Freemason, Houseman Lodge #717, SW


                          ---------------------------------
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                        • bobjinpa@comcast.net
                          Although there were earlier antecedents, the first minuteman organization was part of the new militia plan accepted at the Worcester Country Convention in
                          Message 12 of 18 , Feb 5, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Although there were earlier antecedents, the first minuteman organization was part of the new militia plan accepted at the Worcester Country Convention in September 1774, when it was recommended that up to 1/3rd of the militia were to be organized in minute companies. This concept was shortly thereafter adopted by Suffolk, Essex and Middlesex counties. It spread through Massachusetts thereafter and to a lesser extent in NH, RI and CT.
                            Bob Johnson
                            York PA
                            -------------- Original message ----------------------
                            From: Bruce Cobb <bccparifle@...>
                            > Liste, John, Jack, Glenn,
                            >
                            > When did the term "minuteman" come into being? Was it a period term or after?
                            > I have an 'almost' ancestor that, in his Pension application, called himself a
                            > "minuteman." He was drafted several times, for short periods (months at a
                            > time), near the end of the war. His name was Aaron Depuy out of Springfield
                            > (now Stroudsburg) Pa.
                            >
                            > Just curious,
                            >
                            > Bruce
                            >
                            > Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@...> wrote:
                            > John and jack,
                            >
                            > The "minute companies" lasted into the early year or so of the war. The
                            > Continental Congress resolved that each state should form 1/4 of its militia
                            > into "minute companies" that could be quickly mustered for the defense of their
                            > own or a neighboring state. As John said, they were still militia and seperate
                            > from the Continental Army.
                            >
                            > Glenn
                            >
                            > ju_rees18938 <ju_rees@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi Jack,
                            >
                            > Yes, all Revolutionary militia were drafted from the adult male
                            > population, but minutemen were still militia, not regular Continental
                            > Army troops (they were after all, pre-Continental Army). I am
                            > speaking of actually drafting militia troops for the regular army.
                            > Two different beasts.
                            >
                            > John
                            >
                            > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Sherry" <jsherry49@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Actually the practice of drafting men from the existing militia
                            > began much
                            > > earlier. I have done research on the minutemen and I seem to recall
                            > that
                            > > periodically the minutemen were drawn from the ranks of the
                            > existing militia
                            > > to serve for a limited time.
                            > > Regards,
                            > > Jack Sherry
                            > > 4th Battn. NJV
                            > > Ben Franklin
                            > > High School History Teacher
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > >From: "ju_rees18938" <ju_rees@...>
                            > > >Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                            > > >To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                            > > >Subject: [Revlist] Was: Brigades in the army 1777; Now:
                            > Continental Army
                            > > >drafts
                            > > >Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2007 21:14:48 -0000
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >The practice of drafting men from the enrolled militia to serve in
                            > > >Continental regiments for a short term (usually from 6 to 9 months)
                            > > >began in 1777 and continued almost to the war's end.
                            > > >
                            > > >In 1777 Connecticut drafted (the term used was "detached") men to
                            > > >augment their Continental regiments in 1777. The first attempt at a
                            > > >general draft for the army occurred in 1778 with 11 of 13 states
                            > (SC
                            > > >and Georgia excepted) being authorized by Congress to enact a 9
                            > month
                            > > >draft, or, in lieu of that, some other measure to bring in men.
                            > (One
                            > > >result of this was the enlistment of slaves in Rhode Island instead
                            > > >of a draft, leading to the predominantly black 1st Rhode Island
                            > > >Regiment.) Of the 11 states, 4 decided to use other measures (with
                            > > >poor results), while the remaining 7 enacted a 9 month draft with
                            > > >good to excellent results. At Monmouth (28 June 1778) the New York,
                            > > >New Jersey, and Maryland regiments all had drafted men, the Jersey
                            > > >units with the highest proportion. Numbers of drafted men served
                            > with
                            > > >Lee's Advance force of picked men.
                            > > >
                            > > >The Continental Army draft, called for by Congress on a year-by-
                            > year
                            > > >basis, continued up to and including 1782. Success varied state-by-
                            > > >state and year-by-year.
                            > > >
                            > > >For details see:
                            > > >
                            > > >"'The pleasure of their number': 1778, Crisis, Conscription, and
                            > > >Revolutionary Soldiers' Recollections"
                            > > >Part I. "'Filling the Regiments by drafts from the Militia.': The
                            > > >1778 Recruiting Acts"
                            > > >Part II. "'Fine, likely, tractable men.': Levy Statistics and New
                            > > >Jersey Service Narratives"
                            > > >Part III. "He asked me if we had been discharged �": New Jersey,
                            > > >Massachusetts, New York, Maryland, and North Carolina Levy
                            > Narratives"
                            > > >ALHFAM Bulletin, vol. XXXIII, no. 3 (Fall 2003), 23-34; no. 4
                            > (Winter
                            > > >2004), 23-34; vol. XXXIV, no. 1 (Spring 2004), 19-28.
                            > > >
                            > > >Cheers,
                            > > >
                            > > >John Rees
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >--- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Glenn Williams <gfwilliams607@>
                            > > >wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Matthew and Judy,
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Drafting, or "draughting," levies from the militia by states
                            > to
                            > > >bring their Continental Line regiments to respectable strength
                            > levels
                            > > >for a campaign season was not an uncommon practice for most, if not
                            > > >all, states. They will usually appear under the term "levies"
                            > > >or "militia draughts (or drafts)," on the unit returns or in the
                            > > >enabling legislation. There are also instances of militia being
                            > > >called "into actual service," and attached to Continental brigades,
                            > > >sometime under Continental pay, other times under state, as well as
                            > > >entire formations of state troops being transferred to Continental
                            > > >service in order to meet quotas. One would probably have to check
                            > > >the primary sources on a case by case basis to see how it was done
                            > in
                            > > >every instance. Since this doesn't lend itself to quick
                            > explanation,
                            > > >and could become truly complicated for the causally interested, may
                            > > >be why Wright and others have not included it.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Best Regards,
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Glenn
                            > > > >
                            > > > > frostfree12 <frostfree12@> wrote:
                            > > > > Matthew,
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Have you taken a look at
                            > > > >
                            > > > > http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/units-american/index.htm
                            > > > >
                            > > > > This is taken almost completely from Wright's book.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > An important caveat is that Wright and this site pay little
                            > > >attention
                            > > > > to sources of some recruits, such as the Militia units in NY
                            > that
                            > > >were
                            > > > > drafted into NY Continental Regiments for the 1777
                            > Establishment.
                            > > >I've
                            > > > > seen some hints that this occurred in VA as well, but have no
                            > > >direct
                            > > > > knowledge. It is also confusing that some Regiments, such as the
                            > > >1st
                            > > > > NY (Continental) were broken up as to assignment, as when a few
                            > > > > Companies were sent to Ticonderoga where they received some
                            > militia
                            > > > > draftees. Anthony Wayne appears to have been in command there
                            > > >around
                            > > > > Jan-March 1777, but what his chain of command was exactly is not
                            > > >clear
                            > > > > from Wright's account, and the bios of Wayne don't seem to
                            > mention
                            > > >this
                            > > > > part of his career.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > I only know about this little snapshot re: Ticonderoga because
                            > of
                            > > > > material in the Haldimand Papers surrounding the British
                            > capture of
                            > > >my
                            > > > > ancestor and some others at Sabbathday Point, Lake George, in
                            > March
                            > > > > 1777. It has been frustrating trying to get a better idea of the
                            > > > > overall Continental picture at this time.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Good luck,
                            > > > > Judy
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Keagle" <Rugby_bhoy@>
                            > > >wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > List,
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Can someone help me? I am trying to figure out the
                            > composition of
                            > > > > the
                            > > > > > brigades of Washington's army in the summer of 1777. Any help
                            > as
                            > > >to
                            > > > > > what regiments served with what brigade would be appreciated.
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > ---------------------------------
                            > > > > Get your own web address.
                            > > > > Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > > __________________________________________________________
                            > > Invite your Hotmail contacts to join your friends list with Windows
                            > Live
                            > > Spaces
                            > > http://clk.atdmt.com/MSN/go/msnnkwsp0070000001msn/direct/01/?
                            > href=http://spaces.live.com/spacesapi.aspx?
                            > wx_action=create&wx_url=/friends.aspx&mkt=en-us
                            > >
                            >
                            > ---------------------------------
                            > Be a PS3 game guru.
                            > Get your game face on with the latest PS3 news and previews at Yahoo! Games.
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Bruce C. Cobb
                            > Commander, 5th Pa Reg't Rifles, Oldham's Co.
                            > Captain, Washington Crossing Boat Crew
                            > Director, Moland House, Warwick Twp Historical Society
                            > Treasurer, Historical Society of Lower Southampton Twp .
                            > Pa Freemason, Houseman Lodge #717, SW
                            >
                            >
                            > ---------------------------------
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                            > Browse Top Cars by "Green Rating" at Yahoo! Autos' Green Center.
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >




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