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Re: Hubbarton--rate of fire then and now

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  • Dave
    And yet I have been at some Hubbardtons where there were some uncomfortable pauses by the opposing forces, leaving Gen Bernier holding the mike with nothing
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 29, 2007
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      And yet I have been at some "Hubbardtons" where there were some
      uncomfortable pauses by the opposing forces, leaving Gen Bernier
      holding the mike with nothing to say. Too many times we get into
      the "opposing lines" mentality and forget manuevering, if you just
      keep moving that forces the other guy to counter move and then each
      has to plan harder on when best to fire. It slows the rate of fire
      but keeps the action busy.

      Too many times the forces act like "bullet sponges" and just stand
      there taking volleys and doing nothing. Commanders say "we'll wait
      till they fire next then we'll move", instead it should be more like
      lets flank them and force them to shift fire. Hint: If they are
      pointing their muskets at you DON'T STAND STILL! Or even worse don't
      duck (that one is awful). You don't have to just move forwards and
      backwards, you can move sideways as well, it's called an Oblique
      Attack, Frederick the Great developed it and it works. When they
      point at you don't fall back, just move SIDEWAYS! It irritates the
      enemy, conserves ammo, slows down the rate of fire but keeps the
      action going.

      Dave H
      3NH

      -------------------------------------


      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Barbieri" <ottercreek@...>
      wrote:

      "These comments by Joseph Bird about the fight at Hubbardton brought
      to mind a topic that may interest a broader segment of this list--
      rate of fire."


      "In those hot 100 minutes, Bird comments that he fired "20
      cartridges"--one every five minutes. In our hobby, if we don't go
      through 20 rounds in 20 minutes, there are a lot of upset
      participants. Just another aspect of what we do that ain't right."
      >
      > Mike Barbieri
      > Whitcomb's Corps
      >
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