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Re: learning 18th century songs

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  • barmilitia75
    Justin - I agree with Todd that Mark Tully s book is good, but you will need to read music to figure out the melody if you don t already know it. If you want
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2007
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      Justin -

      I agree with Todd that Mark Tully's book is good, but you will need
      to read music to figure out the melody if you don't already know it.

      If you want to learn by ear, and sing the tunes without instrumental
      backup, there are some CDs and one website that come to mind that may
      be of use:

      See this website for folk melodies of the British Isles and America,
      including several that are appropriate for our period. It includes
      lyrics, history, and multiple versions of several tunes. Also
      included are basic MIDI recordings of the melodies.
      http://www.contemplator.com/

      There are several CDs available with these types of tunes. My
      personal favorites are the recordings of The Virginia Company ("Nine
      Points of Roguery", "Vintage Virginia", and "Smash The Windows"),
      however I understand that these are no longer issued so you'll need
      to find a merchant with old copies to sell.

      Colonial Williamsburg produced a recording called "Nottingham Ale -
      Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg" which is pretty good. Years
      ago, one of the CW musicians, Taylor Vrooman, made a recording
      called "Baroque Bacchanalian Songs" which, as you have probably
      guessed, is full of 17th and 18th century drinking songs. Not one of
      my favorite recordings for daily listening, but good for learning
      tunes.

      I just got a CD called "Roast Beef of Old England" that is mostly
      sailor songs from the 18th and early 19th century (it ties into the
      Capt. Jack Aubrey series of novels). Tunes are performed with
      limited musical accompaniment. Basic notes are included in the CD.

      Finally, there are lots of CDs that have instrumental versions
      (primarily) of tunes from the period… some of my favorites are by
      David and Ginger Hildebrand, Hesperus, Sara & Maynard Johnson and the
      Rogues' Consort, and Bare Necessities (English Country Dance Tunes).

      Hope this helps!

      Mike Connolly
      Outwater's Co. of Militia
    • jumonvilleglen
      Many thanks! Justin Blocksom 11th Pennsylvania Regt. www.11thpa.org ... Songs ... to ... than ... some
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2007
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        Many thanks!

        Justin Blocksom
        11th Pennsylvania Regt.
        www.11thpa.org

        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Todd Post <todd.post2@...> wrote:
        >
        > Justin,
        >
        > Can't be any easier than going to:
        >
        > http://www.ballindalloch-press.com/songs.html
        >
        > and ordering Mark Tully's "A Modest Collection of Traditional
        Songs
        > of the Colonial Period", which includes the lyrics, music, and
        > documentation for the following songs:
        >
        > Anacreon in Heaven (Star Spangled Banner)
        > A-Roving
        > Back and Sides Go Bare
        > Barbara Allenís Cruelty
        > Battle of the Kegs (Yankee Doodle)
        > A Beggin' I Will Go
        > British Grenadiers
        > Chester
        > Diddle, Diddle (Lavendar's Green)
        > Faithís Review and Expectation (Amazing Grace)
        > Felix the Soldier
        > The Foggy, Foggy Dew
        > God Save America
        > God Save the King
        > Greensleeves
        > Heart of Oak
        > How Happy the Soldier
        > Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye
        > The Jolly Tradesmen
        > John Peel
        > The Liberty Song
        >
        > Lilliburlero
        > Loch Lomond
        > The Lusty Young Smith
        > Maggie Lawder
        > Men of Harlech
        > The Miller of the Dee
        > My Dog and I
        > Nottingham Ale
        > Over the Hills and Far Away
        > Pleasant and Delightful
        > The Parting Glass
        > The Rakes of Mallow
        > Roast Beef of Old England
        > Rosin the Beau
        > Spanish Ladies
        > Three Merry Travelers
        > Tobacco's But and Indian Weed
        > The Toper's Song
        > The Trooper Watering His Nag
        > Yankee Doodle
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Todd Post
        > 2d Virginia Regiment
        > www.secondvirginia.org
        >
        > On Dec 31, 2006, at 6:32 PM, jumonvilleglen wrote:
        >
        > > Within the last few years there has been an interest in our unit
        to
        > > sing while on the march/in camp. However, I have no idea (other
        than
        > > to evesdrop on units who already do this) on how to teach myself
        some
        > > of these 18th century marching/tavern songs....
      • Ed St.Germain
        Justin: Try: http://www.americanrevolution.org/songs.html At about the middle of that page are a number of links that will lead you to what you re looking for.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 1, 2007
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          Justin:

          Try:

          http://www.americanrevolution.org/songs.html

          At about the middle of that page are a number of links that will lead you to what you're
          looking for.

          Best regards,
          Ed
          For Revolutionary War information on the Internet, your first choice should be
          AmericanRevolution.org
        • Christopher (Chris) Woolf
          It appears Colonial Williamsburg has pulled the Nottingham Ale-Tavern Songs CD for some reason. Too bawdy perhaps. Can anyone burn me a copy? For historical
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 31, 2007
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            It appears Colonial Williamsburg has pulled the Nottingham Ale-Tavern
            Songs CD for some reason. Too bawdy perhaps.

            Can anyone burn me a copy? For historical research purposes of
            course and not for profit, because that would be wrong.

            Cheers

            Chris



            --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "barmilitia75" <gtr2112@...> wrote:
            >
            > Justin -
            >
            > I agree with Todd that Mark Tully's book is good, but you will need
            > to read music to figure out the melody if you don't already know
            it.
            >
            > If you want to learn by ear, and sing the tunes without
            instrumental
            > backup, there are some CDs and one website that come to mind that
            may
            > be of use:
            >
            > See this website for folk melodies of the British Isles and
            America,
            > including several that are appropriate for our period. It includes
            > lyrics, history, and multiple versions of several tunes. Also
            > included are basic MIDI recordings of the melodies.
            > http://www.contemplator.com/
            >
            > There are several CDs available with these types of tunes. My
            > personal favorites are the recordings of The Virginia Company
            ("Nine
            > Points of Roguery", "Vintage Virginia", and "Smash The Windows"),
            > however I understand that these are no longer issued so you'll need
            > to find a merchant with old copies to sell.
            >
            > Colonial Williamsburg produced a recording called "Nottingham Ale -
            > Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg" which is pretty good.
            Years
            > ago, one of the CW musicians, Taylor Vrooman, made a recording
            > called "Baroque Bacchanalian Songs" which, as you have probably
            > guessed, is full of 17th and 18th century drinking songs. Not one
            of
            > my favorite recordings for daily listening, but good for learning
            > tunes.
            >
            > I just got a CD called "Roast Beef of Old England" that is mostly
            > sailor songs from the 18th and early 19th century (it ties into the
            > Capt. Jack Aubrey series of novels). Tunes are performed with
            > limited musical accompaniment. Basic notes are included in the CD.
            >
            > Finally, there are lots of CDs that have instrumental versions
            > (primarily) of tunes from the period… some of my favorites are by
            > David and Ginger Hildebrand, Hesperus, Sara & Maynard Johnson and
            the
            > Rogues' Consort, and Bare Necessities (English Country Dance Tunes).
            >
            > Hope this helps!
            >
            > Mike Connolly
            > Outwater's Co. of Militia
            >
          • Mark Crosby
            Chris, Contact me off list. Mark Crosby ... Tavern ... need ... that ... includes ... Windows ), ... need ... Ale - ... one ... learning ... mostly ... the ...
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 31, 2007
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              Chris,
              Contact me off list.
              Mark Crosby

              --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher (Chris) Woolf"
              <ccwoolf@...> wrote:
              >
              > It appears Colonial Williamsburg has pulled the Nottingham Ale-
              Tavern
              > Songs CD for some reason. Too bawdy perhaps.
              >
              > Can anyone burn me a copy? For historical research purposes of
              > course and not for profit, because that would be wrong.
              >
              > Cheers
              >
              > Chris
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "barmilitia75" <gtr2112@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Justin -
              > >
              > > I agree with Todd that Mark Tully's book is good, but you will
              need
              > > to read music to figure out the melody if you don't already know
              > it.
              > >
              > > If you want to learn by ear, and sing the tunes without
              > instrumental
              > > backup, there are some CDs and one website that come to mind
              that
              > may
              > > be of use:
              > >
              > > See this website for folk melodies of the British Isles and
              > America,
              > > including several that are appropriate for our period. It
              includes
              > > lyrics, history, and multiple versions of several tunes. Also
              > > included are basic MIDI recordings of the melodies.
              > > http://www.contemplator.com/
              > >
              > > There are several CDs available with these types of tunes. My
              > > personal favorites are the recordings of The Virginia Company
              > ("Nine
              > > Points of Roguery", "Vintage Virginia", and "Smash The
              Windows"),
              > > however I understand that these are no longer issued so you'll
              need
              > > to find a merchant with old copies to sell.
              > >
              > > Colonial Williamsburg produced a recording called "Nottingham
              Ale -
              > > Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg" which is pretty good.
              > Years
              > > ago, one of the CW musicians, Taylor Vrooman, made a recording
              > > called "Baroque Bacchanalian Songs" which, as you have probably
              > > guessed, is full of 17th and 18th century drinking songs. Not
              one
              > of
              > > my favorite recordings for daily listening, but good for
              learning
              > > tunes.
              > >
              > > I just got a CD called "Roast Beef of Old England" that is
              mostly
              > > sailor songs from the 18th and early 19th century (it ties into
              the
              > > Capt. Jack Aubrey series of novels). Tunes are performed with
              > > limited musical accompaniment. Basic notes are included in the
              CD.
              > >
              > > Finally, there are lots of CDs that have instrumental versions
              > > (primarily) of tunes from the period… some of my favorites are
              by
              > > David and Ginger Hildebrand, Hesperus, Sara & Maynard Johnson
              and
              > the
              > > Rogues' Consort, and Bare Necessities (English Country Dance
              Tunes).
              > >
              > > Hope this helps!
              > >
              > > Mike Connolly
              > > Outwater's Co. of Militia
              > >
              >
            • Ron Carnegie
              It isn t a very bawdy cd. Anyway there were soem in the bookstore at CWs visitor center just last month. I believe I have seen some at Jamestown Settlements
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 31, 2007
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                It isn't a very bawdy cd.

                Anyway there were soem in the bookstore at CWs visitor center just last month. I believe I have seen some at Jamestown Settlements store as well.

                Ron Carnegie
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Christopher (Chris) Woolf
                To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 1:11 PM
                Subject: [Revlist] Re: learning 18th century songs


                It appears Colonial Williamsburg has pulled the Nottingham Ale-Tavern
                Songs CD for some reason. Too bawdy perhaps.

                Can anyone burn me a copy? For historical research purposes of
                course and not for profit, because that would be wrong.

                Cheers

                Chris

                --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "barmilitia75" <gtr2112@...> wrote:
                >
                > Justin -
                >
                > I agree with Todd that Mark Tully's book is good, but you will need
                > to read music to figure out the melody if you don't already know
                it.
                >
                > If you want to learn by ear, and sing the tunes without
                instrumental
                > backup, there are some CDs and one website that come to mind that
                may
                > be of use:
                >
                > See this website for folk melodies of the British Isles and
                America,
                > including several that are appropriate for our period. It includes
                > lyrics, history, and multiple versions of several tunes. Also
                > included are basic MIDI recordings of the melodies.
                > http://www.contemplator.com/
                >
                > There are several CDs available with these types of tunes. My
                > personal favorites are the recordings of The Virginia Company
                ("Nine
                > Points of Roguery", "Vintage Virginia", and "Smash The Windows"),
                > however I understand that these are no longer issued so you'll need
                > to find a merchant with old copies to sell.
                >
                > Colonial Williamsburg produced a recording called "Nottingham Ale -
                > Tavern Music from Colonial Williamsburg" which is pretty good.
                Years
                > ago, one of the CW musicians, Taylor Vrooman, made a recording
                > called "Baroque Bacchanalian Songs" which, as you have probably
                > guessed, is full of 17th and 18th century drinking songs. Not one
                of
                > my favorite recordings for daily listening, but good for learning
                > tunes.
                >
                > I just got a CD called "Roast Beef of Old England" that is mostly
                > sailor songs from the 18th and early 19th century (it ties into the
                > Capt. Jack Aubrey series of novels). Tunes are performed with
                > limited musical accompaniment. Basic notes are included in the CD.
                >
                > Finally, there are lots of CDs that have instrumental versions
                > (primarily) of tunes from the period. some of my favorites are by
                > David and Ginger Hildebrand, Hesperus, Sara & Maynard Johnson and
                the
                > Rogues' Consort, and Bare Necessities (English Country Dance Tunes).
                >
                > Hope this helps!
                >
                > Mike Connolly
                > Outwater's Co. of Militia
                >





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Chris E.
                http://www.smoke-fire.com/the-virginia-company-1.asp still available on tape...20th century anyone? Chris E Hampton, VA
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 31, 2007
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                  http://www.smoke-fire.com/the-virginia-company-1.asp

                  still available on tape...20th century anyone?

                  Chris E
                  Hampton, VA
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