Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Question on cleaning wool regimentals

Expand Messages
  • Irishbrit
    Maybe someone on this list can help me out. I have three Regimentals that have not been pre-shrunk or pre-washed before they were made. Is there any way to
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 4, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Maybe someone on this list can help me out. I have three Regimentals
      that have not been pre-shrunk or pre-washed before they were made. Is
      there any way to have them cleaned without running the risk of the
      wool running (they are red with yellow facings and white lace trim) or
      shrinking? This is the third year of use and something has to be done
      (yeah). The local dry cleaners will not touch them.

      Also I am having another one made. What is the best way to prepare the
      wool before putting it together to prevent running and shrinkage?

      Jim Murphy
      Connecticut Colony
    • Neal Hurst
      Hello There are a couple of period ways in cleaning wool garments that you may want to try. You want to wash it with a warm/tepid water and a mild soap. Take
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 4, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello

        There are a couple of period ways in cleaning wool
        garments that you may want to try. You want to wash
        it with a warm/tepid water and a mild soap. Take the
        coat and lay it in a shallow trough of the luke warm
        water. (before that take a section and see if the red
        will run or not, sponge on section through) Then take
        a sponge and sponge it through. Work the soap and
        water through the esspecially dirty parts, rub glently
        on surface stains. Once done make sure you get the
        bulk of the water out and lay it flat to dry....do not
        hang it up....unlike your sports coats and other
        things like modern shirts, your 18th century coats and
        garments bear most of their wwieght in the
        bottoms...if you hang it it will pull at the neck line
        and distort it.

        This is how most broad cloth coats are cleaned in the
        period. The only thinkg that will make the cloth
        shrink is by shocking it. VEry hot to very cold or
        something of the sort. Sheep dont shrink when they
        get wet....

        Liek i said if you have any scraps or a section,
        sumerge it in water rub with some soap and see if it
        runs....shouldnt but ive known plently of guys who get
        pink shirts after an event....

        Cheers
        Neal

        --- Irishbrit <irishbrit@...> wrote:

        > Maybe someone on this list can help me out. I have
        > three Regimentals
        > that have not been pre-shrunk or pre-washed before
        > they were made. Is
        > there any way to have them cleaned without running
        > the risk of the
        > wool running (they are red with yellow facings and
        > white lace trim) or
        > shrinking? This is the third year of use and
        > something has to be done
        > (yeah). The local dry cleaners will not touch them.
        >
        > Also I am having another one made. What is the best
        > way to prepare the
        > wool before putting it together to prevent running
        > and shrinkage?
        >
        > Jim Murphy
        > Connecticut Colony
        >
        >
        >
        >




        __________________________________________
        Yahoo! DSL – Something to write home about.
        Just $16.99/mo. or less.
        dsl.yahoo.com
      • toddstaxi@att.net
        Mein Herr, GruB Gott! Bitte, ich kann auf Englsiche fur Sich scrieben... Jim, The regimental that you wore at Newbury will probably not run. I would suggest
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 4, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Mein Herr,
          GruB Gott! Bitte, ich kann auf Englsiche fur Sich scrieben...
          Jim,
          The regimental that you wore at Newbury will probably not run. I would suggest trying another dry cleaner. Also, tell them not to press it--they will probably break all of your buttons!
          As far as preparing, and this holds true of most fabric/material: 1) Wash in hot water! 2) Dry at high heat!
          That is what I do will all of my fabric/material. Last year, I made two regimentals and it works. I got the tip from my King's Rangers CO. Hope this is helpful. Aloha.
          Ihre Kreigskamerad,
          Herr Hofmann, varies, several
          (a.k.a. Todd E.)

          -------------- Original message from "Irishbrit" <irishbrit@...>: --------------


          > Maybe someone on this list can help me out. I have three Regimentals
          > that have not been pre-shrunk or pre-washed before they were made. Is
          > there any way to have them cleaned without running the risk of the
          > wool running (they are red with yellow facings and white lace trim) or
          > shrinking? This is the third year of use and something has to be done
          > (yeah). The local dry cleaners will not touch them.
          >
          > Also I am having another one made. What is the best way to prepare the
          > wool before putting it together to prevent running and shrinkage?
          >
          > Jim Murphy
          > Connecticut Colony
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList member
          > photos, FAQ, etc., at
          >
          > http://www.liming.org/revlist/
          >
          > TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to
          > Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Woolsey, David
          Dear Mr. Murphy, I clean my regimentals on a regular basis. It can be tedious, but I don t experience shrinkage, and I don t have color-bleed, but I can t
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 5, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Mr. Murphy,

            I clean my regimentals on a regular basis. It can be tedious, but I don't experience shrinkage, and I don't have color-bleed, but I can't predict what the wool in your uniform will due when it comes to colorfastnes or felting, as I don't know where the cloth came from or the dye-batch.

            Using a top-loading washing machine...,

            Draw a medium or large tub of water, and turn the machine off. Let the machine sit open overnight, to allow the water to come to room temperature. DON'T rely on the "warm" setting, or yourself to judge the temp. Allow time to do that for you.

            Use a detergent that is recommended for wool, or that is very gentle. You might want to consider something for infant clothes like Dreft. No dies, unscented if possible. Use 1/4 the amount you would use for a full wash load, and add that to the water. If it's a powder, let it dissolve, or let the machine agitate the water and detergent to dissolve it. Turn the machine off.

            Unbutton all cuffs, facings, the collar, and pocket flaps that can be un-buttoned. Turn the coat inside out, and immerse in the water. Gently force the coat under the water. I use my hands, and make sure the coat is fully immersed. Then let it soak for about four hours.

            Set the washer on "spin" and let it pull the water/detergent out of the coat. Fill up the machine with the same amount of water, with the machine set on "warm", and allow the coat to sit for about an hour. Spin dry the coat again, and remove. NEVER let the coat agitate.

            Hang the coat, still inside out, on a wooden or plastic hanger that is made for a suit-coat. DONT hang it up on a thin hanger of any type. Hang away from direct sunlight, overnight. The next morning parts of the coat will still be damp, so turn the coat right side out, and hang another day. It should be dry then, and you can now rebutton the cuffs, pockets, facings, and collar.

            I have experienced only minor "felting" of the material with this method, and no shrinkage. For a stain, I mix up 1 cup of water with the detergent that I will later add to the wash, and using a soft toothbrush, I use this mixutre to gently pre-scub the stain just before pouring the rest of the detergent into the washer, and then adding the coat.

            Spin-drying the coat doesn't felt the cloth the way agitation would.

            On a fellow reenactor's coat, I noticed some red dye bleeding, so added a cup of white vinegar to the rinse water to make the cloth more color-fast. The white lace on the coat had a very faint "pink" hue, so I scubbed it with the detergent, and added a very small amount of all fabric bleach when rewashing the coat. All was well.

            That's how I clean both of my regimentals, as well as my red, sleeved waistcoat.

            I hope this works for you.

            YOHS

            Dave Woolsey

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Irishbrit
            Sent: Wed 1/4/2006 9:34 PM
            To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
            Cc:
            Subject: [Revlist] Question on cleaning wool regimentals



            Maybe someone on this list can help me out. I have three Regimentals
            that have not been pre-shrunk or pre-washed before they were made. Is
            there any way to have them cleaned without running the risk of the
            wool running (they are red with yellow facings and white lace trim) or
            shrinking? This is the third year of use and something has to be done
            (yeah). The local dry cleaners will not touch them.

            Also I am having another one made. What is the best way to prepare the
            wool before putting it together to prevent running and shrinkage?

            Jim Murphy
            Connecticut Colony





            ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
            Educate a girl. Change her future. Give her hope.
            http://us.click.yahoo.com/EQN7IB/UREMAA/HwKMAA/3OlolB/TM
            --------------------------------------------------------------------~->

            Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList member photos, FAQ, etc., at

            http://www.liming.org/revlist/

            TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to
            Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.
            Yahoo! Groups Links











            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Sgt42RHR@aol.com
            Once a year at the end of the season in October, I take my regimental to my friendly local dry cleaner. I ask them to dry clean it only, and to not press it.
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 5, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Once a year at the end of the season in October, I take my regimental to my
              friendly local dry cleaner. I ask them to dry clean it only, and to not
              press it. I come back in a day or so, give them a few bucks, and take home my
              soft, clean regimental.

              Has worked like a charm for 30 years. I've been using the same dry cleaner
              near my house for the past 22 years, and they've come to expect my annual
              visit.

              Cheers,
              John

              John M. Johnston
              42d Grenr. Compy.
              There's a fine line between hobby and mental illness. Dave Barry


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Colleen Humphreys
              ... Double check that it is NOT real bleach, but that all color, fake bleach stuff! Real bleach disintegrates wool! I use shampoo in the bath tub method, on
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 5, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                At 9:15 AM -0500 1/5/06, Woolsey, David wrote:
                >On a fellow reenactor's coat, I noticed some red dye bleeding, so
                >added a cup of white vinegar to the rinse water to make the cloth
                >more color-fast. The white lace on the coat had a very faint "pink"
                >hue, so I scubbed it with the detergent, and added a very small
                >amount of all fabric bleach when rewashing the coat. All was well.

                Double check that it is NOT real bleach, but that all color, fake
                bleach stuff! Real bleach disintegrates wool!

                I use shampoo in the bath tub method, on wool. Anything gentle,
                really, is fine. And it's the "shock" that felts stuff...change in
                temperature and/or agitation. So whatever temp the water you drain
                out is, the water you add should be about the same...I usually start
                adding water before the old is gone, to make any accidental change
                less and more gradual.

                I make wool sweaters for my sons, and I wash them this way,
                successfully...and they are 7 and 11, so I do it frequently ;-)

                I also use vinegar for running colors. It often works...once I made
                some mittens (which I felted on purpose, using hot and cold water,
                and lots of agitation), and had been told to rinse with ammonia, to
                soften it up after felting. It made them run, so I dumped some
                vinegar in, and it stopped...being a nerd, I dumped in more
                ammonia...more running, stopped by the next vinegar! And by stopped,
                I mean crystal clear, amazing! Pretty cool, huh? So much for
                softening that pair, but a fun experiment!

                I let the item drain in the tub for 5 minutes, or so (too long and
                you risk colors running, even if they didn't before), then either
                spin it, if large, or wrap in a towel and jump on it, until the whole
                towel is pretty wet. Then spread flat to dry. I agree with the
                stretching issues mentioned before, although draping carefully over
                several bars of one of those dowel folding drying racks seems to work
                and support adequately.

                We also use local dry cleaners, with no problems.
                --
                Colleen, Neen@...
                at home with 4 kids 18th Reenactor Mom
                who never met a textile craft she didn't want to try
              • Bruce McNeal
                ... (SNIP) ... Colleen & Dave, I have a wool red/maroon sash that bleeds on my white waistcoat every UTR due to the humidity & sweat. Does the vinager just
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 5, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- Colleen Humphreys <Neen@...> wrote:

                  > At 9:15 AM -0500 1/5/06, Woolsey, David wrote:
                  > >I noticed some red dye bleeding, so added a cup of white
                  > > vinegar to the rinse water to make the cloth
                  > >more color-fast.
                  (SNIP)
                  >
                  > I also use vinegar for running colors.

                  Colleen & Dave,

                  I have a wool red/maroon sash that bleeds on my white waistcoat every
                  UTR due to the humidity & sweat. Does the vinager just stop the
                  bleeding during washing or will this set the color?

                  Thanks,
                  Bruce McNeal
                  Maryland Loyalists
                • gabi shopp
                  it should set it...so does salt...... Miz Gabi ... (SNIP) ... Colleen & Dave, I have a wool red/maroon sash that bleeds on my white waistcoat every UTR due to
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 5, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    it should set it...so does salt...... Miz Gabi

                    Bruce McNeal <mcneal@...> wrote: --- Colleen Humphreys <Neen@...> wrote:

                    > At 9:15 AM -0500 1/5/06, Woolsey, David wrote:
                    > >I noticed some red dye bleeding, so added a cup of white
                    > > vinegar to the rinse water to make the cloth
                    > >more color-fast.
                    (SNIP)
                    >
                    > I also use vinegar for running colors.

                    Colleen & Dave,

                    I have a wool red/maroon sash that bleeds on my white waistcoat every
                    UTR due to the humidity & sweat. Does the vinager just stop the
                    bleeding during washing or will this set the color?

                    Thanks,
                    Bruce McNeal
                    Maryland Loyalists


                    Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList member photos, FAQ, etc., at

                    http://www.liming.org/revlist/

                    TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to
                    Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.



                    ---------------------------------
                    YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


                    Visit your group "Revlist" on the web.

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                    ---------------------------------






                    ---------------------------------
                    Yahoo! Photos
                    Ring in the New Year with Photo Calendars. Add photos, events, holidays, whatever.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Colleen Humphreys
                    ... Depends. Try it. wet it thoroughly in a sink (may as well wash it as long as you are at it ;-), then dump some vinegar into the water, swish and drain
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 5, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      >
                      >
                      >I have a wool red/maroon sash that bleeds on my white waistcoat every
                      >UTR due to the humidity & sweat. Does the vinager just stop the
                      >bleeding during washing or will this set the color?

                      Depends. Try it. wet it thoroughly in a sink (may as well wash it
                      as long as you are at it ;-), then dump some vinegar into the water,
                      swish and drain and rinse. Let dry. Test it. If it doesn't bleed
                      anymore, you are golden. If it DOES, then try Retayne. You can pick
                      it up at quilting stores, usually. you are supposed to use it in the
                      washer and dryer, but for wool like this, I've had good luck using it
                      as if it were vinegar. It's worked for me ;-)
                      --
                      Colleen, Neen@...
                      at home with 4 kids 18th Reenactor Mom
                      who never met a textile craft she didn't want to try
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.