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Enlisting in different counties (and states)

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  • Patrick J OKelley
    Howdy, ... Some historians have estimated that half of the South Carolina line was not from South Carolina. They were from North Carolina and Georgia.
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2004
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      Howdy,

      >Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other than
      >what he lived in?

      Some historians have estimated that half of the South Carolina
      line was not from South Carolina. They were from North Carolina and
      Georgia. Ironically about 3/4 of the Georgia line was not from Georgia.
      They were from North Carolina, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Most of
      Sumter's South Carolina partisans were from North Carolina and Georgia.
      So this seems to be common in the South.

      >And how often or for what reasons would a man give back
      >his "arms" in a county while the war was still going on?

      The only reason he would keep his arms is if he stole them. The
      arms are assigned to a company, and they do not get taken home. The
      turnover rate for soldiers was pretty fast, and if everyone kept his
      arms, there wouldn't have been enough to outfit the army. A good example
      of this is that the men from North Carolina who joined in June of 1775,
      were out of the army by January 1776. The next guys joined in 1776 and
      were out by 1778. The next crop came in right before Monmouth, but were
      out around 1780.

      Patrick O'Kelley
      http://www.2nc.org/
      Author of "Nothing but Blood and Slaughter" The Revolutionary War in the
      Carolinas
      Available at Volume One 1771-1779
      http://www.booklocker.com/books/1469.html
      Volume Two 1780
      http://www.booklocker.com/books/1707.html
    • soggygal2003
      Ah..shortage of arms. Makes sense when considered. I guess when scrambling for men you take what you can get. Though i thought from previous reading alot of
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 31, 2004
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        Ah..shortage of arms. Makes sense when considered.

        I guess when scrambling for men you take what you can get. Though i
        thought from previous reading alot of Mass. counties had a "quota" of
        men to fill throughout. hmm...

        not alot of help in narrowing down this man..then again I know what
        to not "assume" now.

        Thanks alot guys,
        Licia


        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Patrick J OKelley <goober.com@j...>
        wrote:
        > Howdy,
        >
        > >Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other than
        > >what he lived in?
        >
        > Some historians have estimated that half of the South
        Carolina
        > line was not from South Carolina. They were from North Carolina and
        > Georgia. Ironically about 3/4 of the Georgia line was not from
        Georgia.
        > They were from North Carolina, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Most of
        > Sumter's South Carolina partisans were from North Carolina and
        Georgia.
        > So this seems to be common in the South.
        >
        > >And how often or for what reasons would a man give back
        > >his "arms" in a county while the war was still going on?
        >
        > The only reason he would keep his arms is if he stole
        them. The
        > arms are assigned to a company, and they do not get taken home. The
        > turnover rate for soldiers was pretty fast, and if everyone kept his
        > arms, there wouldn't have been enough to outfit the army. A good
        example
        > of this is that the men from North Carolina who joined in June of
        1775,
        > were out of the army by January 1776. The next guys joined in 1776
        and
        > were out by 1778. The next crop came in right before Monmouth, but
        were
        > out around 1780.
        >
        > Patrick O'Kelley
        > http://www.2nc.org/
        > Author of "Nothing but Blood and Slaughter" The Revolutionary War
        in the
        > Carolinas
        > Available at Volume One 1771-1779
        > http://www.booklocker.com/books/1469.html
        > Volume Two 1780
        > http://www.booklocker.com/books/1707.html
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