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question volunteering in different counties

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  • soggygal2003
    Group: a) Was it unusual for a man to enlist in another county other than what he lived in? b) And how often or for what reasons would a man give back his
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 30, 2004
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      Group:

      a) Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other than
      what he lived in?
      b) And how often or for what reasons would a man give back
      his "arms" in a county while the war was still going on?

      I'm looking around in Sudbury & Worcester. As <A> John Warren from
      Sudbury married Elizabeth Carson from Worcester in Worcester 1776.
      There's tons of John Warrens in Worcester just trying to
      decipher/find this particular one.

      Any feedback/suggestions would be appreciated.

      Licia
    • dave1nja
      My ancestor, John Broom, was living in New Jersey but enlisted in Bristol Township, PA. Three of his cousins were in the unit he joined. ... than
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 30, 2004
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        My ancestor, John Broom, was living in New Jersey but enlisted in
        Bristol Township, PA. Three of his cousins were in the unit he joined.

        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "soggygal2003" <soggygal2003@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Group:
        >
        > a) Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other
        than
        > what he lived in?
        > b) And how often or for what reasons would a man give back
        > his "arms" in a county while the war was still going on?
        >
        > I'm looking around in Sudbury & Worcester. As <A> John Warren from
        > Sudbury married Elizabeth Carson from Worcester in Worcester 1776.
        > There's tons of John Warrens in Worcester just trying to
        > decipher/find this particular one.
        >
        > Any feedback/suggestions would be appreciated.
        >
        > Licia
      • J. L. Bell
        ... It was too common for New England men (and at least one woman) to travel to another county and enlist for us to assume that an enlistment record is a
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 31, 2004
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          "soggygal2003" wrote:
          > a) Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other than
          > what he lived in?
          > b) And how often or for what reasons would a man give back
          > his "arms" in a county while the war was still going on?

          It was too common for New England men (and at least one woman) to travel
          to another county and enlist for us to assume that an enlistment record
          is a strong clue to where someone lived.

          I suspect a man would give back his arms if:
          a) he was leaving the service and those arms had never belonged to him
          to begin with--i.e., they were owned by the county militia for the use
          of men who didn't have their own weapons.
          b) he was unable to use those arms because of illness or something
          else, and they were conscripted from him in an emergency. That's not
          actually giving "back."

          I don't know how often either of those situations might have come up.
          The date of the events would be a clue to what else was happening,
          whether the army or militia was scraping for recruits or whether there
          was an army marching down from Canada (or up to Canada).

          Property and property rights were very important to 18th-century
          British-Americans, and they kept pretty good track of who owned what,
          even in wartime. We have expense accounts from Paul Revere and George
          Washington, for instance, for the reimbursements they wanted from the
          governments they served. In this case, someone was keeping track of the
          weapons.

          J. L. Bell JnoLBell@...
        • soggygal2003
          Sudbury: Receipt of Compensation/Fort Number Twelve, Ticonderoga/minute men companies/Sept
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 31, 2004
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            <The date of the events would be a clue to what else was happening>
            Sudbury: Receipt of Compensation/Fort Number Twelve,
            Ticonderoga/minute men companies/Sept 30, 1775
            Married in Worcester; July 24, 1776
            Sudbury:Receipt for Military Equipment/December 16, 1776
            Sudbury:Receipt of Compensation/December 19, 1776-January, 1777

            <for us to assume that an enlistment record is a strong clue to where
            someone lived.> After reading other replies I'd agree. Just makes it
            that much harder trying to figure out who/which John Warren this
            actually is. :)

            I think I'll just put him on the back burner for now until I happen
            to see something else that may help.

            By the way...hows the book coming along?

            Thanks,
            Licia




            --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "J. L. Bell" <jnolbell@e...> wrote:
            > "soggygal2003" wrote:
            > > a) Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other
            than
            > > what he lived in?
            > > b) And how often or for what reasons would a man give back
            > > his "arms" in a county while the war was still going on?
            >
            > It was too common for New England men (and at least one woman) to
            travel
            > to another county and enlist for us to assume that an enlistment
            record
            > is a strong clue to where someone lived.
            >
            > I suspect a man would give back his arms if:
            > a) he was leaving the service and those arms had never
            belonged to him
            > to begin with--i.e., they were owned by the county militia for the
            use
            > of men who didn't have their own weapons.
            > b) he was unable to use those arms because of illness or
            something
            > else, and they were conscripted from him in an emergency. That's
            not
            > actually giving "back."
            >
            > I don't know how often either of those situations might have come
            up.
            > The date of the events would be a clue to what else was happening,
            > whether the army or militia was scraping for recruits or whether
            there
            > was an army marching down from Canada (or up to Canada).
            >
            > Property and property rights were very important to 18th-century
            > British-Americans, and they kept pretty good track of who owned
            what,
            > even in wartime. We have expense accounts from Paul Revere and
            George
            > Washington, for instance, for the reimbursements they wanted from
            the
            > governments they served. In this case, someone was keeping track of
            the
            > weapons.
            >
            > J. L. Bell JnoLBell@e...
          • Joyce & Mike Barbieri
            ... than ... Licia, On many of the rolls from the period, you will see a column headed town from and another headed town went for. Up here in northern New
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 31, 2004
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              --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "soggygal2003" <soggygal2003@y...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Group:
              >
              > a) Was it unusual for a man to "enlist" in another county other
              than
              > what he lived in?

              Licia,

              On many of the rolls from the period, you will see a column
              headed "town from" and another headed "town went for." Up here in
              northern New England, many men came from one town and went for
              another. While I can't speak for all of the men in that position, I
              am sure a large part of the decision came from the differences in
              bounties offered by Congress, states, and towns. For example, in my
              own unit, many of the men came from towns in VT but enlisted for NH
              towns. Vermont--called the NH Grants--being the subject of a heated
              political struggle for control between NH and NY and after July,
              1777, its own republic, had little money with which to pay bounties
              so the men went for NH towns there they could actually collect a
              bounty rather than a promisory note.

              Mike Barbieri
              Whitcomb's Corps
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