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earlier distinction for stockings vs. socks?

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  • Kate Johnson
    Hello all-- This came from Dave Bennett on my Fort Osage list (passed along by permission), and I remembered our talking about stockings and socks here
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 28, 2004
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      Hello all--

      This came from Dave Bennett on my Fort Osage list (passed along by
      permission), and I remembered our talking about stockings and socks here
      too...I'm wondering, was this same distinction true in our period as well as
      the later one referenced here? i.e., socks worn over stockings for winter
      warmth?

      Were socks (as opposed to stockings) made this way in our period? Sounds
      almost like the foot section of bag hose. Was bocking baize used?

      And notice the woman contracted to make _4000_ pair for the army! That is a
      heck of a lot of socks...I'm assuming she was a subcontractor. Any similar
      women in the RevEra?

      > Using my research for the Army of 1808 to 1815.....
      >
      > Stockings was every day wear, and socks were issue for winter wear.
      > Socks were to be worn over the stockings. Most socks issued to the
      > Army were made from "bocking Baize" and were sewned with thread.
      > Bocking baize is similar to modern felt, and bocking baize can still
      > be obtained today. So, the issued army sock was similar to a "felt
      > boot liner". I am not exactly sure how they were sewned. The army
      > issued them in two colors....red and green. There is also
      > documentation that soldiers bought from sutlers and from the
      > Factories bocking baize to make additional socks.
      >
      > In 1814, "knitted socks" were issued to Gen. Winfield Scott's brigade
      > of Regulars who were serving on the Northern Frontier. So far, this
      > is the only issue of knitted socks to regulars troops I have found.
      >
      > Socks were generally issued when the rest of cold weather clothing
      > was issued.


      >
      >
      > The documents listed below come from the Philadelphia supply Agency
      > books in the national Archives.
      >
      > "Sir May 12th, 1813
      > Please to issue to Eleanor Howell the following materials to
      > make Socks. Also, 5 pounds Cotton thread & 1/4 pound thread no. 16
      > for stiching
      >
      > 588 yards Red or green baize
      > 9 pounds thread. I am Sir.....Callender Irvine
      >
      > [to] George Ingels Esq
      > MSK"
      >
      >
      >
      > "Sir May 12th, 1813
      > Please to issue to each of the following named persons, the
      > following materials to make Socks.
      >
      > 196 yds. Green or red baize
      >
      > Each person 3 pounds, thread
      >
      > Hannah Henderson, Sarah Lyndall and Eleanor Howell
      >
      > I am sir....Callender Irvine
      >
      > [to] George Ingels, esqr.
      > MSK"
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > "Sir Pur. Office, March 9th, 1812
      >
      > Be pleased to issue Bocking Baize for Mrs. Weatherby balance of Socks.
      >
      > .....I am yours...T. Coxe PPS "
      >
      >
      >
      > "Sir P. Office, March 10th, 1812
      >
      > Be pleased to issue to mary Weatherby*, materials to make 4000 pairs
      > socks.
      >
      > 784 yards Bocking baize
      > 10 lbs. thread."

      > * Mary Weatherby also held contracts with the Army to make shirts for
      > the Supertindent of Indian Trade. NA RG 75 Orders for Goods 26
      > August 1806 and 4 October 1806.
      >
      > Dave Bennett 1st U. States Infy.
      >
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