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Charles Stedman's role - notes and thoughts

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  • donhagist
    Thanks to those who ve provided information about Stedman. I knew that he served in the Commissary department in some capacity, but it is still not clear to me
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 30, 2004
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      Thanks to those who've provided information about Stedman.
      I knew that he served in the Commissary department in some capacity,
      but it is still not clear to me whether he was a commissioned officer
      in the army, or a civilian working for the army.
      I have doubts about some of the biography below (which I had found on
      the web). There is no evidence whatsoever (that I can find) to
      suggest that Stedman served under Percy early in the war. He appears
      to have been a Pennsylvania lawyer and loyalist who fled Philadelphia
      when the British evacuated that city. He does not show up among the
      civilian commisary staff in the 1779 Army List (I don't have a later
      list on hand), nor does a man of this name appear on any prior Army List.
      It is clear that he was the Commissary General under Cornwallis in
      1780 and 1781, and I'm pretty sure he was a civilian (as were most of
      the commissary staff.
      If anyone knows any details like the date of his appointment, please
      do let me know.
      Don N. Hagist
      22d Regt. F.

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Fuller" <fullerfamily@s...> wrote:
      > http://www.famousamericans.net/charlesstedman/
      > "Charles Stedman
      >
      > STEDMAN, Charles, British soldier, born in England about 1745; died
      in London, 26 June, 1812. He entered the army, served as an officer
      under Lord Percy at, Lexington in 1775, and subsequently with Lord
      Howe in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and with Lord Cornwallis in the
      south. During his later years he was a deputy comptroller of the
      stamp-office. He published "The History of the Origin, Progress, and
      Termination of the American War" (2 vols., London, 1792 ; Dublin,
      1794). This excellent work is especially valuable for its military
      maps. William Thomas Lowndes ascribes its authorship to Dr. William
      Thompson. "
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