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Re: [Revlist] House Paint

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  • twmoran
    One of the things it said is in early America the colonist would mix milk and I believe to get gray paint. Is there any truth to this. Milk paint is still in
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
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      One of the things it said is in early America the colonist would mix
      milk and I believe to get gray paint. Is there any truth to
      this.
      Milk paint is still in use to day. I use it to paint my boxes and bellows. It
      was the paint of the period. Not real water proof though. Good for color.
      I don't know about using blackberries but earth pigments are what's used
      today.
    • barbmvd@aol.com
      I have a note with ingredients for milk paint - 4 lbs (1/2 gal skimmed milk) 6 oz lime - newly slaked 4 oz linseed oil or neets foot oil 1/2 lb. color (rust
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
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        I have a note with ingredients for milk paint -
        4 lbs (1/2 gal skimmed milk)
        6 oz lime - newly slaked
        4 oz linseed oil or neets foot oil
        1/2 lb. color (rust for barn red paint)

        And just for good measure, some information on interior colors:
        Paint was made and tinted by the craftsman in the environment
        in which it was to be applied. Most interior colors were based
        upon white lead dispersed in linseed oil. It was then tinted with
        colors which included earth pigments and natural dyestuffs.

        Flatness was achieved by washing the oil out of the paste by
        slurrying with turpentine and allowing the pigment to settle.
        The solvent was decanted off and the process repeated until the
        desired sheen was achieved.

        Just one caveat - this came from a paint company historian and I
        do not have the actual source documentation. Some paint color
        descriptions were interesting, even to a variation in white - the
        meeting house in the North Precinct of Bridgewater was specified to
        be _white, one shade on the yellow_. (This spec is documented)

        ~Barbara

        Barbara M. Delorey
        Research & Interpretation: 18c New England
        "From Smalle Beginnings"
        The Barrett Women


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Donald Drefke
        When building craftsman style houses in th early 1900s, nails bent during constuction were put in a can of water for a couple weeks and the rusty water was
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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          When building craftsman style houses in th early 1900s, nails bent during constuction were put in a can of water for a couple weeks and the rusty water was used to stain the interior woodwork. I suspect this was an old method of creating a walnut colored stain.

          barbmvd@... wrote:I have a note with ingredients for milk paint -
          4 lbs (1/2 gal skimmed milk)
          6 oz lime - newly slaked
          4 oz linseed oil or neets foot oil
          1/2 lb. color (rust for barn red paint)

          And just for good measure, some information on interior colors:
          Paint was made and tinted by the craftsman in the environment
          in which it was to be applied. Most interior colors were based
          upon white lead dispersed in linseed oil. It was then tinted with
          colors which included earth pigments and natural dyestuffs.

          Flatness was achieved by washing the oil out of the paste by
          slurrying with turpentine and allowing the pigment to settle.
          The solvent was decanted off and the process repeated until the
          desired sheen was achieved.

          Just one caveat - this came from a paint company historian and I
          do not have the actual source documentation. Some paint color
          descriptions were interesting, even to a variation in white - the
          meeting house in the North Precinct of Bridgewater was specified to
          be _white, one shade on the yellow_. (This spec is documented)

          ~Barbara

          Barbara M. Delorey
          Research & Interpretation: 18c New England
          "From Smalle Beginnings"
          The Barrett Women


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        • Sgt42RHR@aol.com
          In a message dated 1/1/04 8:08:26 PM Central Standard Time, ... It was one of the paints of the period, probably used mostly in interior applications. The
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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            In a message dated 1/1/04 8:08:26 PM Central Standard Time,
            twmoran@... writes:
            > It
            > was the paint of the period.

            It was one of the paints of the period, probably used mostly in interior
            applications. The exterior (house) paints of the day were pigments mixed with
            oils, just like today. And contrary to present day myth, folks of the period
            liked glossy finish, and bright colors.

            Cheers,
            John


            John Johnston
            42d. Grenr. Compy.
            "There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness." Dave Barry
          • barbmvd@aol.com
            Makes perfect sense, doesn t it? Just consider the light
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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              <<And contrary to present day myth, folks of the period
              liked glossy finish, and bright colors.>>

              Makes perfect sense, doesn't it? Just consider the light source - candles
              - and the fact that light reflects off glossy surfaces. Also the fact that
              dull
              colors tend to disappear under subtle lighting.

              ~Barbara

              Barbara M. Delorey
              Research & Interpretation: 18c New England
              "From Smalle Beginnings"
              The Barrett Women


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Sgt42RHR@aol.com
              And could be that the tastes and style of the period were just different than today. The notes that Washington left about painting Mt. Vernon suggest that he
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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                And could be that the tastes and style of the period were just different than
                today. The notes that Washington left about painting Mt. Vernon suggest that
                he just luuuuuuved house colors that today, would have us calling the
                neighborhood association!

                Cheers,
                John

                > <<And contrary to present day myth, folks of the period
                > liked glossy finish, and bright colors.>>
                >
                > Makes perfect sense, doesn't it? Just consider the light source - candles
                > - and the fact that light reflects off glossy surfaces. Also the fact
                that
                > dull
                > colors tend to disappear under subtle lighting.


                John Johnston
                42d. Grenr. Compy.
                "There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness." Dave Barry
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