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1st. January 1777

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  • bvogler
    List- A Happy New Year to all my friends, may those that are far asunder meet in good time & enjoy those pleasures that are best suited to ye mind. Captain
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 31, 2003
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      List-
      "A Happy New Year to all my friends, may those that are far asunder meet in good time & enjoy those pleasures that are best suited to ye mind."
      Captain John Peebles, 42nd Regiment of Foot

      And so it goes,
      Good bye 2003
      Good Luck to us all in 2004!
      Bob V.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gstk1776
      Dear List, There have been several threads on betrayal and loyalty recently, and they have resurrected some questions that have long puzzled me: 1) I recall
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 1, 2004
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        Dear List,

        There have been several threads on betrayal and loyalty recently, and
        they have resurrected some questions that have long puzzled me:

        1) I recall being told some years ago (by an American) that Congress
        reprimanded Washington for allowing his officers to continue drinking
        the Loyal Toast (ie a toast to King George) at their evening meal; my
        recollection is that this was around November 1776, five months after
        the Declaration of Independence. Has anyone else heard of this, or
        (better still) can anyone confirm it?

        2) The term "Ministerial Army" was used widely on the outbreak of
        hostilities in 1775 to describe British soldiers. This was a fiction
        designed to show that the Colonists regarded the King's ministers as
        the authors of their distress, and presumably was also designed to
        deflect the treasonable aspect of firing on the "King's men". When
        did people cease using this term and how widespread was it (most of
        the references I've seen are from New England)?

        3) I have read here and there that some officers and men of the
        Continental Army (and presumably some militia personnel, too) were
        unhappy at the Declaration of Independence and left the service of
        Congress in protest, as this was not what they were fighting for - I
        imagine most simply "retired" but a few must have become Loyalists.
        Does anyone know what sort of numbers were involved and whether any
        of the leavers later became famous?

        A happy New Year to all List Members and especially those serving
        their countries in Iraq and elsewhere around the globe.

        Brendan Morrissey
      • Glenn Valis
        Now Todd Braisted could tell you much more, but, Colonels Skinner and Von Buskirk of the British Provincial force the NJ Volunteers quit the protest movement
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 2, 2004
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          Now Todd Braisted could tell you much more, but, Colonels Skinner and Von
          Buskirk of the British Provincial force the NJ Volunteers quit the 'protest'
          movement and went to the British side after the Declaration.




          --

          Your humble servant,

          Glenn Valis

          Outwater's Militia

          glenn@...

          > From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
          > Reply-To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: 2 Jan 2004 05:57:19 -0000
          > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Revlist] Digest Number 3189
          >
          > 3) I have read here and there that some officers and men of the
          > Continental Army (and presumably some militia personnel, too) were
          > unhappy at the Declaration of Independence and left the service of
          > Congress in protest, as this was not what they were fighting for - I
          > imagine most simply "retired" but a few must have become Loyalists.
          > Does anyone know what sort of numbers were involved and whether any
          > of the leavers later became famous?
        • IVBNNJV@aol.com
          In a message dated 1/2/2004 12:14:09 PM Eastern Standard Time, Glenn@doublegv.com writes: Now Todd Braisted could tell you much more, but, Colonels Skinner and
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 2, 2004
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            In a message dated 1/2/2004 12:14:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            Glenn@... writes:
            Now Todd Braisted could tell you much more, but, Colonels Skinner and Von
            Buskirk of the British Provincial force the NJ Volunteers quit the 'protest'
            movement and went to the British side after the Declaration.
            Actually, General Skinner was inside the British lines and an ardent Loyalist
            before the declaration.

            Good examples of officers who quit the Continentals ostensibly over the
            Declaration of Independence would be Rudolphus Ritzema of the New York Line, John
            B. Scott of the New Jersey Line, and William Allen of the Pennsylvanians. All
            would become officers in the Provincial Corps.

            Todd W. Braisted
            4th Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers
            IVBNNJV@...
            www.royalprovincial.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • xxiipc@aol.com
            Lt. Col. William Allen of the First Battalion of Pennsylvania Loyalists was the commander of the Second Pennsylvania Regiment of the Continental Line. He
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 2, 2004
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              Lt. Col. William Allen of the First Battalion of Pennsylvania Loyalists was
              the commander of the Second Pennsylvania Regiment of the Continental Line. He
              resigned his commission because the Congress didn't check with his family
              before declaring independence. His father was the chief justice of the Pennsylvania
              court. The family had contributed money to the state to build the state house
              (Independence Hall).

              An Old Campaigner
            • David Roberts
              As near as I can figure out my ancestor Thomas Conklin [1731-1811] of Huntington, L. I., fought for both sides during the Revolution. He was on the Patriot
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 3, 2004
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                As near as I can figure out my ancestor Thomas Conklin [1731-1811] of Huntington, L. I., fought for both sides during the Revolution. He was on the Patriot side at the beginning of the War and after the occupation of Long Island in 1776 ended up on the Loyalist side. I know he & some others from Huntington were captured and jailed in Hartford, Connecticut, by the Patriots for a period [early 1780's, I think]. But, he came home and lived the rest of his life in the Huntington area. I guess living in an occupied area, people's loyalties went w/ whomever was in power at the time.
                The really committed Loyalists from Long Island left for Nova Scotia or Upper Canada.
                I've lived in only two counties in my entire life and both were occupied by "enemy" forces during each of the major wars on U. S. soil: Suffolk County, L. I., N. Y. - a Patriot county occupied by the British 1776-1783 and St. Mary's County, Md. - a Confederate County occupied by the Union 1861-1865. It's interesting to study local history in both areas and learn about civilian life during an occupation by the "enemy." Actually, I think the Union's occupation of St. Mary's was far worse for the assault on political and civil liberties - especially jail w/out trials or any formal charges; for property damage, the British occupation of Suffolk County was pretty bad, especially property owned by Presbyterian or other Calvinist church congregations. The Union seemed to leave church property alone, other than the slaves owned by the Jesuits on the Order's huge plantations in St. Mary's. The Jesuit priests were among the largest slave holders in the county. This certainly wasn't the case in the Revolution, when the British went out with a vengence against Presbyterian property.
                Anyway, it's an interesting topic: "What was in like to live behind Enemy Lines ?" I guess there's somebody's master's thesis for them !
                Take care, everybody, and have a great 2004
                David

                David Roberts
                Hollywood, MD
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: IVBNNJV@...
                To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 12:21 PM
                Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: Loyalty


                In a message dated 1/2/2004 12:14:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                Glenn@... writes:
                Now Todd Braisted could tell you much more, but, Colonels Skinner and Von
                Buskirk of the British Provincial force the NJ Volunteers quit the 'protest'
                movement and went to the British side after the Declaration.
                Actually, General Skinner was inside the British lines and an ardent Loyalist
                before the declaration.

                Good examples of officers who quit the Continentals ostensibly over the
                Declaration of Independence would be Rudolphus Ritzema of the New York Line, John
                B. Scott of the New Jersey Line, and William Allen of the Pennsylvanians. All
                would become officers in the Provincial Corps.

                Todd W. Braisted
                4th Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers
                IVBNNJV@...
                www.royalprovincial.com





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Joyce & Mike Barbieri
                ... fiction ... as ... Brendan, While reading some of The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, I came across a letter from John
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 3, 2004
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                  --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "gstk1776" <gstk1776@y...> wrote:
                  > The term "Ministerial Army" was used widely on the outbreak of
                  > hostilities in 1775 to describe British soldiers. This was a
                  fiction
                  > designed to show that the Colonists regarded the King's ministers
                  as
                  > the authors of their distress, and presumably was also designed to
                  > deflect the treasonable aspect of firing on the "King's men". When
                  > did people cease using this term and how widespread was it (most of
                  > the references I've seen are from New England)?


                  Brendan,

                  While reading some of "The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of
                  the United States," I came across a letter from John Adams to the
                  Pres. of Congress dated Dec. 8, 1778, in which he says;

                  "It has been usual to consider this as a ministerial war, but I have
                  ever thought they would some time or other discover it to be a
                  national war. The few men of the nation who think seriously of the
                  business see clearly, in the long train of consequences of American
                  independence, the loss of their West India islands, a great part of
                  their East India trade, the total loss of Canada, Nova Scotia, the
                  Floridas, all the American fisheries, a diminution of their naval
                  power, as well as national bankruptcy and a revolution in their
                  government in favor of arbitrary power. And the nation in general has
                  a confused dread upon its spirits of all these things."

                  It hints that some (maybe the New Englanders you mention) still used
                  the term "ministerial" in talking about the war.

                  Mike Barbieri
                  Whitcomb's Corps--the original unit being all good New Englanders
                • IVBNNJV@aol.com
                  In a message dated 1/3/2004 9:39:52 AM Eastern Standard Time, droberts@olg.com writes: As near as I can figure out my ancestor Thomas Conklin [1731-1811] of
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 3, 2004
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                    In a message dated 1/3/2004 9:39:52 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                    droberts@... writes:
                    As near as I can figure out my ancestor Thomas Conklin [1731-1811] of
                    Huntington, L. I., fought for both sides during the Revolution. He was on the Patriot
                    side at the beginning of the War and after the occupation of Long Island in
                    1776 ended up on the Loyalist side.
                    Hi David

                    There are at least four references to Thomas Conklins serving in Loyalist
                    corps during the war. There were at least two men, Thomas Conklin, Senior &
                    Thomas Conklin, Junior, both from Huntington, Suffolk County, Long Island.

                    Both of the above are listed as taking the oath of allegiance to the British
                    when Governor Tryon made his tour of the island in 1778. Senior was listed as
                    a farmer, fifty years old; Junior as a weaver, 24 years old. Both from
                    Huntington. Source: Great Britain, Public Record Office, Colonial Office, Class 5,
                    Volume 1109, Pages 2-49.

                    Both are listed as serving in the Suffolk County Militia (Loyalist.) There
                    were four companies I believe from Huntington. Source: Huntington Town
                    Historian, Huntington Town Records, Volume III, Page 26.

                    Two Thomas Conklins later pop up in Loyalist corps. Could be the same
                    people, or two different ones. I'd say at least one is one of the above, given
                    where he served, viz.

                    A Thomas Conklin served in the Associated Loyalists at Lloyd's Neck, which is
                    right next door to Huntington. The Associators were disbanded in late 1782,
                    and a number volunteered for service in the Armed Boat Company, where he
                    became a private on 12 October 1782. He was involved in a naval engagement in Long
                    Island Sound on 7 December 1782 and killed. Source: National Archives
                    Canada, Chipman Papers, MG 23, D1, Series I, Volume 27, Pages 368-371. The
                    incident is described in length in a letter from Benjamin Tallmadge to George
                    Washington, dated 8 December 1782 in the George Washington Papers. The roll lists
                    only five men killed and 1 officer & 9 men captured, so it differs from what
                    Tallmadge claimed.

                    The other Thomas Conkin reference shows one enlisting on 9 May 1782 in the
                    Loyal American Regiment. The regiment was at Gowanus, Brooklyn at the time, so
                    they were on the island. He deserted 24 June 1783. Source: National Archives
                    Canada, RG 8, "C" Series, Volume 1869, Page 52 & Volume 1870, Page 33.

                    There were over two dozen Conklins as Loyalists during the war, the vast
                    majority from Long Island. We have many documents about the corps listed above on
                    our website, which I invite you to peruse.

                    YMH&OS,

                    Todd W. Braisted
                    4th Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers
                    IVBNNJV@...
                    www.royalprovincial.com


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Jay Callaham
                    ... From: David Roberts To: Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 8:55 AM Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: Loyalty ...
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 3, 2004
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                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "David Roberts" <droberts@...>
                      To: <Revlist@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 8:55 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: Loyalty


                      > As near as I can figure out my ancestor Thomas Conklin [1731-1811] of
                      Huntington, L. I., fought for both sides during the Revolution. He was on
                      the Patriot side at the beginning of the War and after the occupation of
                      Long Island in 1776 ended up on the Loyalist side. I know he & some others
                      from Huntington were captured and jailed in Hartford, Connecticut, by the
                      Patriots for a period [early 1780's, I think]. But, he came home and lived
                      the rest of his life in the Huntington area. I guess living in an occupied
                      area, people's loyalties went w/ whomever was in power at the time.

                      <snip>

                      It was like that all over, in the South as well. That's one reason that I
                      cannot condemn Benedict Arnold as fiercely as some others can. MANY people
                      changed sides. Granted that he had a position that allowed him to
                      potentially inflict great harm, but he didn't do anything that wasn't done
                      by a lot of other people. When balanced against the good that he did, I can
                      cut his memory some slack. And given the serious treasonous of people like
                      James Wilkinson, Gen. Twiggs and others - he's a piker!

                      Cheers!

                      Jay
                      Cm Gds
                      4th Coy, Bde of Guards
                    • bdodgeweaver
                      ... recently, and they have resurrected some questions that have long puzzled me . . . I have read here and there that some officers and men of the Continental
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 3, 2004
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                        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "gstk1776" <gstk1776@y...> wrote:
                        > Dear List, There have been several threads on betrayal and loyalty
                        recently, and they have resurrected some questions that have long
                        puzzled me . . . I have read here and there that some officers and
                        men of the Continental Army (and presumably some militia personnel,
                        too) were unhappy at the Declaration of Independence and left the
                        service of Congress in protest, as this was not what they were
                        fighting for - I imagine most simply "retired" but a few must have
                        become Loyalists. Does anyone know what sort of numbers were
                        involved and whether any of the leavers later became famous? Brendan
                        Morrissey
                        _____________

                        Dear Brendan: Happy New Year! While others may differ from my view,
                        the one individual who comes to my mind as unwilling to accept the
                        escalation from protest to armed struggle was Joseph Galloway, the
                        influential Pennsylvania politician and member of the First
                        Continental Congress who ended up siding with the Crown. As a number
                        of the members of this list are aware, Galloway was a close friend of
                        Dr. Franklin and a born American. John Dickinson may be closer to
                        what you are considering, a member of the Second Continental Congress
                        who refused to vote for Independence.

                        Of course, your question was directed to the Army. One candidate for
                        a Continental Officer who left the Army in protest - or for chief
                        hypocrite - was Nicholas Haussegger, the first Colonel commanding
                        the German Regiment (also known as the German Battalion). He seems
                        to have been a competent soldier, serving as a sergeant in the
                        Regiment of Struler in 1756 (a Swiss regiment in the Netherlands
                        service), then in the Royal American Regiment (1756-1760) and as a
                        Lieutenant and Captain in the Pennsylvania Regiment (1760-c.1764).
                        Following the start of the AWI he accepted a commission as Major in
                        the 4th Pa. Batt. under Anthony Wayne. He was commissioned Colonel
                        of the German Regiment in July 1776, and reported to take command of
                        the unit in Philadelphia in October 1776.

                        His February 1, 1781 resignation letter may be found at the on-line
                        Washington papers maintained by the Library of Congress, and notes in
                        part that "The principles of the present contest have been so totally
                        changed from what they were when I first accepted a Commission under
                        your command and myself so much neglected and injuriously treated by
                        those in whose service I was that I can not consistant with the
                        honest man and in justice to myself hold it any longer."

                        Haussegger's description of himself as "honest" is something of a
                        stretch. He was "captured" under very suspicious circumstances on
                        January 1 or January 2, 1777 as part of the delaying force of
                        Washington's Army prior to the cannonade at the Assunpink Bridge
                        during the Second Battle of Trenton, and had accepted his Colonel's
                        commission after, not before, the Declaration of Independence. While
                        awaiting parole in New York City in early 1777 he urged other
                        captured Continental officers to abandon the cause of Independence,
                        and he is mentioned as a sort of spy in secret correspondence between
                        Arnold and Andre in 1779. The best account I have seen of
                        Haussegger is James F. Davis (Thomas V. Uhrich, ed.), "A Man of No
                        Country: the Case of Colonel Nicholas Haussegger 1729-1786" Vol.
                        XVII, No. 3, Lebanon County Historical Society, Lebabon, PA (1989).

                        Thad Weaver
                        German Regiment
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