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A Sleeping costom question

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  • Webb, Martin
    Et All, I was asked at a local educational event I did last week if Bundleing Bags were common and where they came from. It was asked due to seeing it on the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 2, 2003
      Et All,
      I was asked at a local educational event I did last week if "Bundleing Bags" were common and where they came from. It was asked due to seeing it on the patriot the move.
      Anyone have any thoughts on this?
      Martin
      42d. RHR
    • yangesegal2003
      ... if Bundleing Bags were common and where they came from. It was asked due to seeing it on the patriot the move. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Martin
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 4, 2003
        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Webb, Martin" <mrwebb@p...> wrote:
        > Et All, I was asked at a local educational event I did last week
        if "Bundleing Bags" were common and where they came from. It was
        asked due to seeing it on the patriot the move. Anyone have any
        thoughts on this? Martin 42d. RHR<

        This subject has fascinated me for a very long time. After I saw The
        Patriot, I decided to find out more about this interesting custom.
        There is quite a bit of information available on the internet. Here
        is a link to a good article: www.fortklock.com/bundling.htm
        And here is another article written by Rhonda McClure, a professional
        genealogist:

        "What is Bundling?
        So then, just what is bundling? Bundling was a method of allowing a
        young man and a young woman who were of marriageable age to continue
        courting into the late hours of the night, by courting in bed.
        Bundling offered a way for the couple to continue their conversation
        well into the night.

        Bundling was a necessity. When you think about the distances that
        often separated the farms in colonial times, it begins to make sense
        that when the boy came calling that if he had to return home that
        night he wouldn't have any time to spend with his girl before it was
        time to go home. Another way that bundling was used for courting was
        to have those homes with girls of marriageable age to place a lighted
        candle in the window. Boys traveling on foot or horseback know this
        was a sign that they could stop at the house and be bundled for the
        evening. One has to wonder how effective this was in catching a beau.

        Bundling was apparently also used for more than just the courting
        couple. There was seldom much extra room in homes built in the 1600s
        since these homes already housed at least one large family. It
        boggles the mind when I think of how crowded it must have been in
        those homes.

        Variations on a Theme

        There are many different methods for bundling. The way used in The
        Patriot was to place one person in a bag of sorts that was then sewn
        at the top so that only his head was out. This was known as a
        bundling bag. Other methods included:
        Placing a board down the center of the bed that, in effect, cut the
        bed in half. Simply laying on the bed with all clothes still on.
        Placing a bolster - a long large pillow - down the center in the bed.

        Where Did They Bundle?

        While many consider bundling to be a northern tradition, it was
        actually practiced all over the place though it may have been done
        under a different name (for example, "tarrying" or "queesting"). In
        addition to the New England states, bundling was also practiced in
        New York and Pennsylvania. It may even have been practiced in some of
        the Mid-Atlantic states. It has also been said that it has been
        practiced by the Amish and Mennonites.

        Another little known fact about bundling is that it did not cease to
        exist once we were in the 1700s. References to bundling can be found
        throughout the 1800s and there are reports of bundling taking place
        as recently as 1937. It is possible that in your family treasures you
        have a diary that mentions the practice of bundling, though they may
        not have called it that."

        JJ.
      • Robert A Selig
        Salut, here s an account of a bundling event gone awry and the consequences. It is taken from the unpublished Journal d un emigre ou cahiers d un etudiant en
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 8, 2003
          Salut,

          here's an account of a bundling event gone awry and the consequences. It
          is taken from the unpublished "Journal d'un emigre ou cahiers d'un
          etudiant en philosophie." The author is the marquis du Bouchet who
          served under Gates in 1777 and 1778 (incl. Saratoga) and returned to the
          States with Rochambeau. The quote (my translation) is on fols 147/48.

          Bob Selig
          =============
          "The young girls in the state of Connecticut, apparently possessed of
          more self-confidence than those of other states, have no scruples to
          grant men, under certain conditions, the permission to sleep with them.
          In general these favors are considered on their part as a kind of
          engagement and preliminary to marriage, which is usually concluded soon
          thereafter. Now, after having engaged in Bondelage, it is generally
          accepted in this province, that one does not always get married
          afterwards; sometimes it is only the fifth or sixth bundler (=bondeleur)
          who is married, which is, altogether, fortunate.

          When strictly observed, the rules of bundling permit innocent
          caresses, all the affection proper to brother and sister; anything more
          is rigorously forbidden. … In this case, to the shame of a young man of
          the neighborhood, there was a rumor in the inn and among the confidences
          of the girls, confirmed by the tears of the daughter of our innkeeper,
          which divulged enterprises of an odious nature. Carried away by the
          flights of his passion which could no longer contain any desires, he had
          been unable to confine himself to permissible favors and would have
          invaded the conjugal domain, had not the girl's courageous resistance
          interposed an obstacle. The tribunal of public opinion held that he
          should be forever barred from the Temple of Hymen. The decree would have
          been enforced by the agreement of all the maidens concerned with the
          observation of the laws of bundling had he not obtained his pardon and
          promised before us all to take the offended girl to wife the following
          week."
          =========

          Additional literature:

          Mary Durham Johnson, "Polly à la Française: A Study of the French
          Officers' Views of American Women during the American Revolution,
          1776-1783" Eighteenth-Century Life 3 (September 1976), pp. 26-34.
          Bernard Chevignard, "Les Voyageurs Europeens et la Pratique du
          'Bondelage' (Bundling) en Nouvelle-Angleterre a la Fin du XVIIIe Siècle"
          Groupe de Recherche et d'Etudes Nord-Americaines 2 vols (Marseilles,
          1986), II, pp. 75-87.



          yangesegal2003 wrote:
          >
          > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Webb, Martin" <mrwebb@p...> wrote:
          > > Et All, I was asked at a local educational event I did last week
          > if "Bundleing Bags" were common and where they came from. It was
          > asked due to seeing it on the patriot the move. Anyone have any
          > thoughts on this? Martin 42d. RHR<
          >
          > This subject has fascinated me for a very long time. After I saw The
          > Patriot, I decided to find out more about this interesting custom.
          > There is quite a bit of information available on the internet. Here
          > is a link to a good article: www.fortklock.com/bundling.htm
          > And here is another article written by Rhonda McClure, a professional
          > genealogist:
          >
          > "What is Bundling?
          > So then, just what is bundling? Bundling was a method of allowing a
          > young man and a young woman who were of marriageable age to continue
          > courting into the late hours of the night, by courting in bed.
          > Bundling offered a way for the couple to continue their conversation
          > well into the night.
          >
          > Bundling was a necessity. When you think about the distances that
          > often separated the farms in colonial times, it begins to make sense
          > that when the boy came calling that if he had to return home that
          > night he wouldn't have any time to spend with his girl before it was
          > time to go home. Another way that bundling was used for courting was
          > to have those homes with girls of marriageable age to place a lighted
          > candle in the window. Boys traveling on foot or horseback know this
          > was a sign that they could stop at the house and be bundled for the
          > evening. One has to wonder how effective this was in catching a beau.
          >
          > Bundling was apparently also used for more than just the courting
          > couple. There was seldom much extra room in homes built in the 1600s
          > since these homes already housed at least one large family. It
          > boggles the mind when I think of how crowded it must have been in
          > those homes.
          >
          > Variations on a Theme
          >
          > There are many different methods for bundling. The way used in The
          > Patriot was to place one person in a bag of sorts that was then sewn
          > at the top so that only his head was out. This was known as a
          > bundling bag. Other methods included:
          > Placing a board down the center of the bed that, in effect, cut the
          > bed in half. Simply laying on the bed with all clothes still on.
          > Placing a bolster - a long large pillow - down the center in the bed.
          >
          > Where Did They Bundle?
          >
          > While many consider bundling to be a northern tradition, it was
          > actually practiced all over the place though it may have been done
          > under a different name (for example, "tarrying" or "queesting"). In
          > addition to the New England states, bundling was also practiced in
          > New York and Pennsylvania. It may even have been practiced in some of
          > the Mid-Atlantic states. It has also been said that it has been
          > practiced by the Amish and Mennonites.
          >
          > Another little known fact about bundling is that it did not cease to
          > exist once we were in the 1700s. References to bundling can be found
          > throughout the 1800s and there are reports of bundling taking place
          > as recently as 1937. It is possible that in your family treasures you
          > have a diary that mentions the practice of bundling, though they may
          > not have called it that."
          >
          > JJ.
          >
          >
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