Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Knapsacks / Backpacks

Expand Messages
  • RCour52197@xxx.xxx
    From what I ve learned and been told ,the British army started the war with the goatskin covered knapsacks and later in the war started going to the painted
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 30 10:59 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      From what I've learned and been told ,the British army started the war with
      the goatskin covered knapsacks and later in the war started going to the
      painted canvas packs.The goatskin packs were givin to the Loyalist units for
      the remainder of the war,which is why I carry one.The canvas pack is a better
      pack because there is a lot more room to carry stuff including a blanket.
      YHOS
      Bob Courtney
      1st. Battn./DeLancey's
      By the way did I mention I was selling a pack?
    • Radford Polinsky
      Nah then, Lads, A m bahn to tell thee summat... ... From my vast statistical base of three period examples of painted knapsacks, one is rendered: 1st G III R
      Message 2 of 9 , May 3, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        Nah then, Lads, A'm bahn to tell thee summat...

        >I've noticed that the British Army had two styles of knapsacks. The
        >ones with goat fur on them, and the ones that are painted.
        >With the ones that are painted, was there an official way of designating
        >the unit on the pack. For example, would the 33rd Regiment be painted as
        >"XXXIII"?

        >Does anyone have any information on what the emblems and designations
        >were on the painted backpacks?

        From my vast statistical base of three period examples of painted knapsacks,
        one is rendered: 1st G III R Gds., one is rendered: TENTH G III R REGIMENT
        N.B. MILITIA, and one is rendered: SCARSDALE DERBY LOCAL MILITIA with a floral
        design in the center. All of these markings are on a circular or oval painted
        area centered on the outside flap of the knapsack. You have one Arabic
        numeral, one spelled out number, and one unnumbered militia. You also have two
        Roman numeral III's. Were I to design a marking for a painted Knapsack for the
        33rd (we use goatskin-more expensive but chicks dig it), I would use the
        Crown, G3R cypher, and XXXIII we use on our Bell of Arms. There is ample
        evidence of regiments using either Roman or Arabic numerals on differing
        items: buttons, belt plates, muskets - Arabic. Colours, tents - Roman.
        Different regiments did it different ways; the Tenth Regiment uses a Roman
        numeral on its belt plates, the 33rd; Arabic. "Gold Roman Characters" are
        specified for the center design of Colours, but aside from that I don't know
        of an "official" preference for style of numbers.

        >I have seen secondary sources that show the painted backpacks as a
        >reddish color, and in the center was a yellow or tan color circle.
        >Inside this circle was the unit designation.

        There is some speculation that at times the knapsack may have been painted in
        the facing color, although the London Chronicles' description of the Guards'
        new knapsacks "painted a light orange colour to keep out the wet" does not
        support this. The N. B. Militia knapsack is also painted an orangy color. The
        Scarsdale Derby knapsack is painted a dark reddish ocher. A different
        Coldstream Guards knapsack is said to be a "Knapsack of black canvas with the
        regimental badge painted on it." The color of knapsacks and the design of
        their emblems seems to be far from standardized.

        Cheers!

        --
        Radford Polinsky
        (Sjt. John Savage, Col's. Coy., HM 33rd Foot; BAR, BBde)
        colscoy@...
        http://home.earthlink.net/~colscoy/
      • Linnea Bass
        Radford -- Thanks for saving me from digging out the info on these knapsacks! I was stalling and you took care of the situation before I got into action. And
        Message 3 of 9 , May 3, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          Radford --
          Thanks for saving me from digging out the info on these knapsacks! I
          was stalling and you took care of the situation before I got into
          action.

          And list --
          Unfortunately, I discovered some time ago that the Guards knapsacks in
          question were from the 1790's rather than the 1770's or 1780's. Whether
          that makes them appropriate for us -- you won't catch me saying a
          thing!!!


          Radford Polinsky wrote:
          >
          > >From my vast statistical base of three period examples of painted knapsacks,
          > one is rendered: 1st G III R Gds., BIG SNIP

          This knapsack was accompanied by a 1790's coat and is so similar to some
          1790's watercolours, that I would have to say that it can be more
          reliably dated to that period than to ours. The 1790's engravings,
          which were watercoloured, show the following:
          1st Guards -- Tan knapsack with a blue oval. In the oval in three lines
          of "text"
          1 G III R Gds
          Coldstream Guards -- Medium blue knapsack with the regimental badge
          painted on it.
          Third Guards - same as Coldstream but with their regimental badge.


          > There is some speculation that at times the knapsack may have been painted in
          > the facing color, although the London Chronicles' description of the Guards'
          > new knapsacks "painted a light orange colour to keep out the wet" does not
          > support this.

          To be more specific, this reference, from October 1790, says that these
          new knapsacks are going to the men who were draughted for foreign
          service. The old knapsacks, "which were of goat's hair" were turned
          in. SIGH. So how long had they had these goat's hair ones? And why
          didn't they take the goat's hair ones on foreign service? Don't know,
          of course!

          Cheers,
          Linnea Bass
          Brigade of Guards Grenadier Co., NWTA
        • Jay Callaham
          ... Phil Katcher s book, Encyclopedia of British, Loyalist & Hessian Units has a good photo of a Loyalist pack. There are several painted knapsacks in the
          Message 4 of 9 , May 3, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            >From: "Patrick J O'Kelley" <goober.com@...>
            >
            >Howdy,
            > I've noticed that the British Army had two styles of knapsacks. The
            >ones with goat fur on them, and the ones that are painted.
            > With the ones that are painted, was there an official way of designating
            >the unit on the pack. For example, would the 33rd Regiment be painted as
            >"XXXIII"?
            > I have seen secondary sources that show the painted backpacks as a
            >reddish color, and in the center was a yellow or tan color circle.
            >Inside this circle was the unit designation.
            > Does anyone have any information on what the emblems and designations
            >were on the painted backpacks?

            Phil Katcher's book, "Encyclopedia of British, Loyalist & Hessian Units" has
            a good photo of a Loyalist pack. There are several painted knapsacks in the
            collections of the National Army Museum in London and the Scottish United
            Services Museum in Edinburgh - all belonging to one regiment. They have
            variations.

            In my coy of the Guards, we use the goatskins because we have records of
            goat hides being purchased in the 1750s and in the late 1780s there is a
            note that the old packs - of fur - were being turned in for the painted
            canvas kind. The lack of information related directly to our period means
            either or both could have been used at different times, but with no other
            information, we've at least got the war "bracketed" as the artillery would
            say!

            Cheers,

            Jay
            Brigade Coy, Guards
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.