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Re: [Revlist] Cannon cockers - Naval Flintlocks

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  • Bart Reynolds
    Jay, Patrick et al, I know that I have posted some material about flintlock firing devices being used by naval guns during the AWI. I think the material was
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2001
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      Jay, Patrick et al,

      I know that I have posted some material about flintlock firing devices
      being used by naval guns during the AWI. I think the material was in
      relation to other items so searching the archives only by subject titles
      might not produce the desired results.

      The use of flintlocks ignition devices on naval guns goes back to
      roughly the mid 1750s. It worked but the idea was discarded at least
      twice before it gained firm acceptance during the Napoleonic period.

      I'm busy with adding links and other improvements to the Army List
      project at the moment and regret that I don't have the time to look up
      the information on naval flintlocks. However, when I get this project
      completed I'll be more than happy to look it up and post it.

      Best Regards,

      Bart Reynolds

      Jay Callaham wrote:
      >
      > > From: Patrick J OKelley <goober.com@...>
      > > Date: 2001/08/03 Fri AM 07:07:36 EDT
      > > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > CC: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [Revlist] Cannon cockers
      > >
      > > Howdy,
      > >
      > > > You will be pleased to identify the "cannon-cocking" device in use
      > on
      > > any
      > > > one of the Royal Artillery field pieces deployed at Minden. I
      > > respectfully
      > > > observe that such would be of the greatest of interest to one and
      > all
      > > of us
      > > > :>) !!!
      > >
      > > Just like an artilleryman. You have to let an infantryman
      > point
      > > out where your cocker is.
      >
      > Now, now, Patrick. That question was asked by a Quartermaster, not an
      > artilleryman. I'm sure it was missing from one of his invoices so he
      > wanted to know where to look for it. ("Natives is not on my invoices,
      > Mr. Harford - - ammunition IS! - - - and must be accounted for - - -
      > AND the brass cartridge cases returned.")(/;^D
      >
      > > On a side note...weren't there flintlocks mounted on naval
      > > carriages at this time? I knew they were around in the Napoleonic
      > Wars.
      >
      > I was wondering the same thing. I've seen them illustrated on naval
      > and garrison guns, but don't know when they came into use.
      >
      > Bart? Lee? other naval types?
      >
      > Thanks.
      >
      > Jay
      > Cm Gds
      > 4th Coy, Bde of Guards
      >
      > Jay Callaham
      > callaham@...
      >
      > "If you do not receive this, it must have miscarried, therefore I beg
      > you write and let me know." - - - Sir Boyle Roche, 18th century Member
      > of Parliament
      >
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    • PBSP@AOL.COM
      List One of the thin Shire Album books, #186 on Naval Cannon, by John Munday (1987/1998), mentions that Admiral Lord Anson ordered flintlock primers to be
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2001
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        List
        One of the thin Shire Album books, #186 on Naval Cannon, by John Munday
        (1987/1998), mentions that Admiral Lord Anson ordered flintlock primers to be
        supplied for his quarter-deck guns in 1755 and that Captain Charles Douglas
        of HM Ship Duke equipped his ship with flintlock primers in 1778, using his
        own money as the Navy refused to supply them. A painting of Douglas, as
        Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Douglas Bt, is in the National Maritime Museum in
        Greenwich (I don't know the date of the painting but uniform looks
        contemporary to our period, at least to this landlubber's eyes) and he has
        his left hand on a flintlock primer fitted to a naval tube. But the book
        echos what has been said on the list before that there are lapses of time
        before this and other innovations gain wider acceptance.
        John Mills
        Mott's Artillery
      • Bart Reynolds
        Joe & List, Very interesting indeed. I have seen reports of the Prussians firing up to 16 rounds per minute from smaller field guns but I was under the
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4, 2001
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          Joe & List,

          Very interesting indeed. I have seen reports of the Prussians firing up
          to 16 rounds per minute from smaller field guns but I was under the
          impression that they were not sponging between shots.

          The rate of 23 rounds per minute from a heavy 12-pounder and sponging as
          well has to be the all time record. I wonder if that was done with the
          carriage "scotched" to prevent recoil. That rate of fire would seem to
          allow no time for getting the gun back in battery.

          To obtain that rate of fire Col. Desaguliers must have had his gunners
          choreographed rather than merely drilled. Since this method was not
          generally adopted it must have been determined to be too difficult or
          risky for all but the very best guns crews and relegated only to Royal
          dog and pony shows. I would certainly like to have seen it done.

          Best Regards,

          Bart Reynolds



          joe_craig@... wrote:
          >
          > For what it's worth, here's an article from the Annual Register
          > for
          > 1770:
          >
          > [23? August 1770]
          >
          > "This morning their Majesties honoured the regiment of artillery
          > with their presence in the warren at Woolwich. His Majesty came
          >purposely to see some experiments tried. ... Their Majesties next saw >a heavy twelve pounder brass gun filled twenty three times with shot in >a minute, spunging between each fire, and loading with the greatest >safety, which surprising every spectator, having far surpassed any >quick firing ever yet practiced.-The method is entirely new, and
          > supposed to be the invention of Col. Desaguliers_."
          >
          > Be interesting to know what the Colonel's new method was all
          > about.
          >
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