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Re: [Revlist] Period paperback book covers.......

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  • Ron Carnegie
    ... invention...of the 19th century. In fact, I have been told that Charles Dickens was the inventor of that style of binding, as it made his serial novels
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 2, 2001
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      At 06:39 PM 8/2/01 -0400, you wrote:
      >Greetings Liste,
      > As I understand it, paperback covers as we know them to day were an
      invention...of the 19th century. In fact, I have been told that Charles
      Dickens was the inventor of that style of binding, as it made his serial
      novels cheaper to produce and therefore allowed a greater profit. Now by
      "paperback covers as we know them" I am specifically referring to those
      constructed out of stiff paper with a glue binding- just what you see in the
      grocery stores. However, having never seen a "paperback" bible lacking this
      style of binding, I'd say that nothing short of attempting to mimic a wood
      hardcover would be period correct. However, I will certainly bow to others
      whose knowledge exceeds mine in this category. Just wanted to offer that
      little tidbit.
      >

      There are stitch books with simple paper covers stitched to the
      book, very easy to do yourself. Some books also lack any cover at all, and
      are simply stitched together. Both these methods are however meant for
      cheap books, not meant to be kept. I have not seen an eighteenth century
      bible bound this way. Most 18th century bibles I have seen (with the
      exception of only one) were very large books, much larger than the size
      common today. The one exception was just about the same size as the common
      modern bible. All of the original bibles I have seen are fully leather
      bound, some rather elaborately gilt.

      18th century binding by the way does not use wood, it uses thick
      card. I believe that older bindings (medieval) did occasionally use wood,
      but I haven't really studied that.

      Cheers,
      Ron Carnegie
      r.carnegie@...
      *************************************************
      "The poetry of history lies in the quasi-miraculous fact that
      once on this earth, on this familiar spot of ground walked
      other men and women as actual as we are today, thinking
      their own thoughts, swayed by their own passions but now
      all gone, vanishing after another, gone as utterly as we
      ourselves shall be gone like ghosts at cockcrow."
      G.M. Trevelyan
      *************************************************
    • Jay Callaham
      ... ... In some cases, books were printed and delivered like this, but then the owner had them bound. This is one reason that in many antique libraries
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 3, 2001
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        > From: Ron Carnegie <r.carnegie@...>

        <snip>

        > There are stitch books with simple paper covers stitched to the
        > book, very easy to do yourself. Some books also lack any cover at all, and
        > are simply stitched together. Both these methods are however meant for
        > cheap books, not meant to be kept.

        In some cases, books were printed and delivered like this, but then the owner had them bound. This is one reason that in many antique libraries you will find all sorts of books on a variety of subjects with a similar binding - all done by the same binder for one individual.

        The Bible I use is a reprint of a 1600s edition that I got for less than $20.00 off the 'net. I then had DeLea Sayers bind it in leather for less than $30.00 if memory serves. Nice book.

        More later. Not at my sources.

        Jay
        Cm Gds
        4th Coy, Bde of Guards


        Jay Callaham
        callaham@...

        "If you do not receive this, it must have miscarried, therefore I beg you write and let me know." - - - Sir Boyle Roche, 18th century Member of Parliament
      • thelionandlamb@yahoo.com
        Kind folks, I was sent by a lady on the 18th century board to the Books a Million site, and I found the seriously period Bible of my dreams, but better get out
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 3, 2001
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          Kind folks,

          I was sent by a lady on the 18th century board to the Books a Million
          site, and I found the seriously period Bible of my dreams, but better
          get out the Master Card or Visa, or a BIG piggy Bank....

          http://www.booksamillion.com/ncom/booksid=9968679048987&pid=1570743894

          It is a replica of the 16ll King James Version Bible, with the
          original format and the 1611 typeface (Gothic). No concordance, no
          red letters. It is 1520 pages, and weighs 20 pounds, according to
          the very helpful human that I talked to on their 800 number. It is
          noramlly $200.00 plus dollars; you can pick it up at their site for
          $175.00, or $157.50, if you are a member of their club.

          I told the Ladies my kids expect to eat this week ( ;OD!), so I guess
          I'll go cover my .50 cent Bible as best I may; maybe I'll splurge on
          a nice bottle of craft glue!

          Thanks...I am learning alot!
          Leann
        • Jay Callaham
          ... From: To: Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 3:31 PM Subject: [Revlist] Period paperback book
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 3, 2001
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <thelionandlamb@...>
            To: <Revlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 3:31 PM
            Subject: [Revlist] Period paperback book covers.......


            > Ok, Folks. How's this for a strange question....????
            >
            > My search for an 18th century reprint KJV Bible has been in vain, so
            > now for plan B.....

            Here's a source for the 1611 Edition for about $35.00 - - though they are
            out of stock right now:

            http://www.thomasnelson.com/thomasnelson/product_detail.asp?sku=0840700415&d
            ept%5Fid=318

            If the text wraps and you lose the suffixes, just go to:
            www.thomasnelson.com

            Click on "King James Bibles" and scroll WAY down.

            Good looking book - it's the one I use (though the price has gone up since I
            bought mine). Got it leather covered by DeLea Sayers so you can still have a
            really nice leather covered Bible for about $60.00 or 70.00 or so.

            Good hunting!

            Jay
            Cm Gds
            4th Coy, Bde of Guards
          • Bruce McNeal
            ... On Amazon.com you can get a reprint of the 1611 King James which includes the Apocrapha (sp?) and the translators notes in the margin just like the
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 4, 2001
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              --- thelionandlamb@... wrote:
              > It is a replica of the 16ll King James Version Bible, with the
              > original format and the 1611 typeface (Gothic). No
              > concordance, no red letters. It is 1520 pages, and weighs 20


              On Amazon.com you can get a reprint of the 1611 King James which
              includes the Apocrapha (sp?) and the translators notes in the
              margin just like the original. Admittedly they changed the font
              for readability. However, at $28.50 including shipping it's not
              bad and it doesn't weigh more than one of your kids. Add the
              $30 or so DeLea charges to rebind it and you have a fine example
              for under $60.


              =====
              Yr Hmbl & Obdnt Srvnt,
              Bruce McNeal
              1st Battn Maryland Loyalists
              "At the same time that I acted with the greatest zeal against my rebellious countrymen, I never forgot that I was an American."
              - Major Walter Dulany, Md Loyalists

              __________________________________________________
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            • David Kinghorn
              Dear List, An 18th cent. version of a paperback, (other than the temporary paper covers already mentioned elswhere) was a limp vellum cover ( limp meaning
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 4, 2001
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                Dear List,

                An 18th cent. version of a paperback, (other than the temporary paper covers already mentioned elswhere) was a limp vellum cover ("limp" meaning that there are not boards under the vellum which is pretty stiff of itself.) These were usually done for account books and were not often used on printed books, at least in England, though I've seen plenty from I believe Italy and Spain. A Bible would certainly have been bound in leather, morrocco for the finest bindings, calf for the majority, and sheep for the cheapest. These would have been full leather bindings, as quarter bindings didn't come into vogue until the 19th cent. Boards would have been paste board. Wooden boards were still occasionally used, as another reply has proved, but these would have been rare. The volume needed for the "mass market" would have required the quickness and cheapness of paste board.

                My recommendation, other than having a period binding done, would be to tear the old cover off and leave it that way! Particularly if you're someone who wouldn't have had the means to buy a bound book, it would look like you'd acquired someone richer's old worn out copy.

                David Kinghorn
                H.M. 10th Regt. of Foot

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: thelionandlamb@...
                Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2001 3:51 PM
                To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Revlist] Period paperback book covers.......

                Ok, Folks. How's this for a strange question....????

                My search for an 18th century reprint KJV Bible has been in vain, so
                now for plan B.....

                I found a King James Bible today at a yard sale, that on the inside
                LOOKS fairly period. No concordance, or cross references, etc. The
                paper even looks a bit old. But the cover is definately NOT
                period...very 20th century.

                Now I KNOW they had paperback books in the 18th century. Has anyone
                seen covers that someone in the 18th century has made, so that the
                books would be more permanant? I have seen elaborate embroidered
                covers, but I don't think my humble tome can handle such heavy
                treatment. How would one cover this book---or any book---so it looks
                period? Maybe you are reading an 18th century novel that you bought
                at Barnes and Nobel, with a glossy cover...?????

                Thanks,
                Leann



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              • asher1756@yahoo.com
                Leann, I recently purchased a 2 Volume hardcover Photocopy of the King James Bible with Geneva Bible sidenotes (1672) from Still Waters Revival Books
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 4, 2001
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                  Leann,

                  I recently purchased a 2 Volume hardcover Photocopy of the
                  King James Bible with Geneva Bible sidenotes (1672) from Still Waters
                  Revival Books (www.swrb.com) in Edmonton, AB, Canada. I think
                  shipping and all was around $60 U.S. I am going to try to rebind
                  them into one volume, being photocopies they have the original
                  typeset. If I can figure out how I will try to post Psal. XXIII in
                  the files. This is the least expensive reproduction I've found.
                  Hope this helps.

                  Ymh&os,

                  Blake Asher
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