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More on hunting shirts and bag pipes, too!

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  • graphicart@epsi.net
    Hi Dave and list-- I found this an interesting bit of documentation on the use of bagpipes by the military, Americans in this case, yes? Pardon my ignorance,
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2001
      Hi Dave and list--

      I found this an interesting bit of documentation on the use of bagpipes
      by the military, Americans in this case, yes? Pardon my ignorance, but
      where is Winchester, and any idea how big a town it was at the time?

      Regards,
      Kate
      graphicart@...
      http://www.epsi.net/graphic/
      Graphics/Fine Arts Press
      Journal of the Middle Waters Frontier

      French Abbe' accompanying the
      French forces to Yorktown.

      "June, 6, 1775.

      The Drum beats, & the Inhabitants of this Village muster each morning
      at five o Clock ... I rode to Winchester - The Court was sitting --
      Mars, the great God of Battle, is now honoured in every Part of this
      spacious Colony, but here every Presence is warlike, every Sound is
      martial! Drums beating, Fifes & Bag-Pipes playing, & only sonorous &
      heroic Tunes -- Every Man has a hunting-Shirt, which is the Uniform of
      each Company -
    • Ralph Burke
      ... Winchester is in Frederick County, which is all the way at the north tip of VA. Winchester is on I-81 about 10 miles south of the West VA border. I don t
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2001
        >Pardon my ignorance, but
        >where is Winchester, and any idea how big a town it was at the time?

        Winchester is in Frederick County, which is all the way at the north tip of
        VA. Winchester is on I-81 about 10 miles south of the West VA border. I
        don't know about the population then (other than "small"), but even now it
        is only about 25K.

        YHS,

        RJB

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      • jfraser@krollworldwide.com
        Winchester was a town of less than 1000 people on the frontier in 1775. It did have a courthouse, a wagon road, and a fort left over from the F&I era. It was
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 2, 2001
          Winchester was a town of less than 1000 people on
          the frontier in 1775. It did have a courthouse, a
          wagon road, and a fort left over from the F&I era.
          It was also the home base of Daniel
          Morgan, who raised 2 rifle regiments and marched to
          Boston after the news of Bunker Hill. It was reported
          that Morgan's Virginia Riflemen marched into camp
          at Boston to the accompaniment of bagpipes.

          Winchester is at the lower (Northern) end of the
          Shenandoah Valley. The Valley was heavily settled
          by Scots, Scots-Irish, Germans, and Englishmen
          from the northern counties of England. The settlements
          were organized by religious affiliations, with churches
          at the centers of each community. The bagpipes
          may well have been played in every settlement but the
          German/Lutheran settlements.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • turf12001@yahoo.com
          ... Hello Kate -- Sorry for the late reply, but I ve been out of the office. I d guess the bagpipes came to Winchester with some of the Scotch-Irish that
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 5, 2001
            --- In Revlist@y..., graphicart@e... wrote:
            > Hi Dave and list--
            >
            > I found this an interesting bit of documentation on the use of
            >bagpipes by the military, Americans in this case, yes? Pardon my
            >ignorance, but where is Winchester, and any idea how big a town it
            >was at the time?

            Hello Kate --

            Sorry for the late reply, but I've been out of the office.

            I'd guess the bagpipes came to Winchester with some of the
            Scotch-Irish that traveled by the thousands from Pennsylvania to
            North Carolina in the 1700's. As you probably know, the Scotch-Irish
            landed in Philadelphia, moved west, found out the Indians didn't like
            them moving into the neighborhood, and then headed south. Winchester
            was one of the major towns on that route. There are a few books about
            the migration and route. I believe one is called "The Great Wagon Road
            or the Great Valley Road."

            As for Winchester itself, Johann Dohla, one of the Germans captured at
            Yorktown in 1781, wrote that it contained about 300 houses. This was
            interesting to me because he also said Williamsburg contained about
            300 houses. Dohla spent a considerable amount of time in Winchester as
            a prisoner and as I recall describes a lot about prisoner life there.

            As others have mentioned, several other groups of prisoners passed
            through the area. The Trenton prisoners were originally housed in
            Dumfries, VA and [somewhere else] and when Howe entered the Chesapeake
            in 1777 the prisoners were moved to Winchester. IIRC, the thousands of
            Convention army prisoners, orginally kept in Charlottesville, VA,
            passed through Winchester, but it doesn't appear they stayed.
            British Lt. Anburey mentions passsing through the town when the
            prisoners were moved because of the British presence in Virginia in
            1780.

            Winchester must have been a jumping place, though. In his journal,
            cavalryman Baylor Hill of the 1st Continental Dragoons related being
            posted there for a few weeks in the spring of 1779 and IIRC all he did
            was drink, dance, and party 'til dawn at various balls [typical
            cavalryman].

            Sorry I don't have time to post any quotes from the journals of Dohla,
            Anburey, Baylor Hill, or the many others (especially Germans) who
            passed through Winchester, but I think Don Hagist sells all of the
            books.

            Oh yes, Dan Morgan the famous Col. of the 7th VA. raised his rifle
            corps in Winchester in 1775 and marched to Boston from there.

            Cheers.
            David McKissack, 7th VA
            "...those dear ragged Continentals, whose patience will be the
            admiration
            of future ages." Colonel John Laurens, KIA, Combahee Ferry, SC, 27 Aug
            1782.
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