Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Revlist] QUESTION--Terms for Cloth in the 18th Century.

Expand Messages
  • Ron Carnegie
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 31, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      <You may be able to get some answers from Colonial Williamsburg <which
      < operates
      < many "stores." I haven't heard of frize, but baize is like <modern day
      < muslin
      < - a very loosely woven cloth.

      Just two things. One, none of the stores in the historic area at Colonial
      Williamsburg sell cloth (though some have cloth on display), the craft store
      sells cloth for home decorating, but it is not wool.

      Frieze and baize are both wools and neither are like muslin. Muslin is a
      thin open weave cotton. I have far more familiarity with baize than frieze,
      as it is used all over town as a writing service. (the green cloth you see
      on writing desks, tables, and billiard tables is baize). Baize is more like
      felt than muslin. Frieze is often referred to with coats, particularly
      over coats and sailor clothing so I suspect it is a tightly weaved (or
      perhaps felted or fulled) cloth.

      Like many others have already said, Montgomery's book is a great resource.
      There is a new one by Sally Queen that is helpful. Sally has printed a book
      that has the descriptions of several period fabrics, with a swatch of a
      reproduction of each. Real helpful.

      Cheers,
    • Dan & Kate
      Mr. Johnston asked How is cloth napped? Does it at several extra steps? When in the cloth ... Nappping is a final process. It is a brushing to raise a
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 2, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Mr. Johnston asked "> How is cloth napped? Does it at several extra steps?
        When in the cloth
        > making process does it occur?

        Nappping is a final process. It is a brushing to "raise a nap", make a
        fuzzy surface. It can be done when the cloth is raw off the loom before it
        is washed and dried and shrunk, or it can be done after the washing and
        drying.

        If done before washing and drying, the fuzz has a chance to mat up in the
        wash and be very difficult to pull loose... rather like felt.

        If done after, then the fuzz remains light and fluffy like a mohair
        garment, and some of the fibers can be transfered to other garments... as in
        pink mohair sweater on dark jacket.

        Kate Henry
        4th Ft. Grenadier Co NWTA

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <Sgt42RHR@...>
        To: <Revlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2001 5:55 PM
        Subject: Re: [Revlist] QUESTION--Terms for Cloth in the 18th Century.


        > How is cloth napped? Does it at several extra steps? When in the cloth
        > making process does it occur?
        >
        > John
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.