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Re: Orders of the Day - Highlanders

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  • BMWBYNUM99@aol.com
    John and List: ... The only period reference I have seen to pipe music being used for the camp duty calls is from an orderly book of the Western Fencibles (a
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 30, 2000
      John and List:

      On 27 Dec., jfraser@k... wrote:
      > I am looking for AWI records that reflect orders of the day
      > for Highland regiments on campaign or in winter
      > quarters. In particular, I am searching for orders that
      > reflect the music that was used to signal the various parts
      > of the military day.

      The only period reference I have seen to pipe music being used for
      the camp duty calls is from an orderly book of the Western Fencibles
      (a regiment that stayed in Scotland). The order for 25 July 1778
      states "The two Pippers are to take the dutty day about and to play
      ther Following tunes Vizt.
      Gathering [Assembly] Coagive & Shea [Cogadh ni Sith -- War or Peace]
      Revelee Gliasvair [A Glas Mheur -- The Finger Lock]
      The Troop Bodachnabrigishin [Bodaich nam Briogais -- The Carles wi'
      the Breeks]
      Retreat Gillychristie [Cill Chriosda -- Killiechrist]
      Tatoo Mollachdephit Mahary [Moladh do Ghibht Mairi -- Mary's
      Praise for her Gift]"
      I found this quote [with modern Gaelic and English titles for the
      tunes added in brackets] in a collection compiled by BAR Drum Major
      Kerry Jost for the Yorktown bicentennial event in 1981. The tunes
      are all pibroch (the "classical music of the bagpipe"), not the
      standard march or dance airs that most pipers play today.

      On the other hand,I have heard (but have no documentation) that
      Highland regiments usually played the "Scotch Duty"(Reveille,
      Retreat, Tattoo, etc.) on fife and drum like their Lowland
      counterparts, reserving the pipes for the march and battle. The same
      25 July 1778 orders for the Western Fencibles also refer to
      a "fiffer" and drummer with the Main Guard as well as the "pippers"
      who were to play the duty tunes.

      YMHS,
      Bill Bynum
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