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Re: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?

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  • Todd Post
    Depends on the site (NPS, state agency, etc.) and/or umbrella organization, but you can do just fine with 90 grains. Todd Post, tpost@patriot.net
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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      Depends on the site (NPS, state agency, etc.) and/or umbrella organization,
      but you can do just fine with 90 grains.

      Todd Post, tpost@...

      > From: dagroot@...
      > Reply-To: Revlist@egroups.com
      > Date: Wed, 02 Aug 2000 16:04:58 -0000
      > To: Revlist@egroups.com
      > Subject: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?
      >
      > --- What is the proper power charge of an "offical" cartridge? (How
      > many grains?)
    • John Thornton
      I ve been in units where 180 was the normal, but that s a lot of powder. A lot of events specify, usually about 100 grains. Check your event invitation. Our
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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        I've been in units where 180 was the normal, but that's a lot of powder. A
        lot of events specify, usually about 100 grains. Check your event
        invitation. Our unit has no required size, but we shoot between 100-120 in
        .75 caliber weapons unless the site says otherwise.

        John Thornton

        Loyalist Militia of Chatham County





        -----Original Message-----
        From: dagroot@... [mailto:dagroot@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 12:05 PM
        To: Revlist@egroups.com
        Subject: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?


        --- What is the proper power charge of an "offical" cartridge? (How
        many grains?)


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      • Todd Post
        180? Yikes! I m sure some would say that is a safety concern, but for me it s more of a waste of powder. There is a point of diminishing return where the
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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          180? Yikes! I'm sure some would say that is a safety concern, but for me
          it's more of a waste of powder. There is a point of diminishing return
          where the "pop" is as loud as it's going to get without ramming.

          Todd

          > From: "John Thornton" <jt@...>
          > Reply-To: Revlist@egroups.com
          > Date: Wed, 2 Aug 2000 12:15:14 -0400
          > To: <Revlist@egroups.com>
          > Subject: RE: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?
          >
          > I've been in units where 180 was the normal, but that's a lot of powder. A
          > lot of events specify, usually about 100 grains. Check your event
          > invitation. Our unit has no required size, but we shoot between 100-120 in
          > .75 caliber weapons unless the site says otherwise.
          >
          > John Thornton
          >
          > Loyalist Militia of Chatham County
        • John Thornton
          When you still have a lot of burning powder coming out of that * l o n g * barrel, you ve hit that diminished return! Above 120, you re not getting much
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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            When you still have a lot of burning powder coming out of that * l o n g
            * barrel, you've hit that diminished return! Above 120, you're not getting
            much louder.
            On the economic side, I pay around $6.50 a pound for powder. At 100
            grains to the cartridge, that's 70 to the pound or about 10 cents a
            cartridge. At 120 grains, each one costs me 12 cents, and 180's set me back
            almost 19 cents each! A few violent battles can cost a chunk of change for
            not much more effect.

            John Thornton

            Loyalist Militia of Chatham County





            -----Original Message-----
            From: Todd Post [mailto:tpost@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 12:17 PM
            To: Revlist@egroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?


            180? Yikes! I'm sure some would say that is a safety concern, but for me
            it's more of a waste of powder. There is a point of diminishing return
            where the "pop" is as loud as it's going to get without ramming.

            Todd

            > From: "John Thornton" <jt@...>
            > Reply-To: Revlist@egroups.com
            > Date: Wed, 2 Aug 2000 12:15:14 -0400
            > To: <Revlist@egroups.com>
            > Subject: RE: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?
            >
            > I've been in units where 180 was the normal, but that's a lot of powder.
            A
            > lot of events specify, usually about 100 grains. Check your event
            > invitation. Our unit has no required size, but we shoot between 100-120
            in
            > .75 caliber weapons unless the site says otherwise.
            >
            > John Thornton
            >
            > Loyalist Militia of Chatham County



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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • aquazoo@patriot.net
            We never used glue, either. In fact, we did not fold the ends, we pinched and tied them with thread. Wrapping the thread around two times worked well. The we
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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              We never used glue, either. In fact, we did not fold the ends, we
              pinched and tied them with thread. Wrapping the thread around two times
              worked well. The we would snip off the end close to the thread, maybe
              1/8" away. The bottom of the cartridge was next dipped in beeswax, about
              1/2". That would hold the end together. Just a thin coating of wax is
              necessary. We'd toss a red crayon into the beeswax for live cartridges;
              it made a good visual indicator. (Be sure to use a double boiler to melt
              the wax.)

              We folded over the tops the same way, and found that packing the
              cartridges into small bags kept the ends folded. We used mini paper bags,
              the 1 lb size which is smaller than a lunchbag. Twelve cartridges fit
              very neatly on end in that size bag. We'd cut off the top of the bag,
              fold & glue it closed, sometimes even stamp it with the regiment number.

              The packets made it very easy to issue ammuniton; no need to count
              out cartridges on the site or to hide plastic bags.

              Isn't there some sort of cartridge box, I forget the name, that has
              an open rectangle in the middle and six holes on either side? That
              prompted our method of packaging the cartridges, as a packet would fit
              nicely in that space.

              I used to work for a printer, and had someone cut up a lot of
              (unprinted 20thC) newsprint into the shape we needed for the cartridges.

              It does sound like a lot of work, but we used to get a pretty good
              assembly line going with many members of the unit helping.

              -Carol Kocian
            • Roger Fuller
              And it s VERY dangerous. Esp. when elevated, as all the particles will come down on the opposed side like grapeshot. (wouldn t that be some volley...) The
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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                And it's VERY dangerous. Esp. when elevated, as all the particles will come
                down on the opposed side like grapeshot. (wouldn't that be some volley...)
                The blast, point blank, wouldn't exactly be pleasant either. And what
                happens should somebody inadvertently double-load?..... 360 grains of BP
                going off- hoo-ah!

                Wasn't there something in the BAR Dispatch last winter about the telltale
                BOOM of a double loaded musket as opposed to the bang that a musket should
                make when properly loaded with 90- 110 grains? BTW for those who aren't used
                to muskets with live loads, they sound much as the reenactment variety
                (powder only) do, just a sharper crack as the ball leaves the barrel.

                A unit that loads muskets with 180 grains of powder each... who are these
                yahoos? Keep 'em away from me.

                Roger

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Todd Post <tpost@...>
                To: Revlist@egroups.com <Revlist@egroups.com>
                Date: 02 August 2000 12:17
                Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?


                >180? Yikes! I'm sure some would say that is a safety concern, but for me
                >it's more of a waste of powder. There is a point of diminishing return
                >where the "pop" is as loud as it's going to get without ramming.
                >
                >Todd
                >
                >> From: "John Thornton" <jt@...>
                >> Reply-To: Revlist@egroups.com
                >> Date: Wed, 2 Aug 2000 12:15:14 -0400
                >> To: <Revlist@egroups.com>
                >> Subject: RE: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?
                >>
                >> I've been in units where 180 was the normal, but that's a lot of powder.
                A
                >> lot of events specify, usually about 100 grains. Check your event
                >> invitation. Our unit has no required size, but we shoot between 100-120
                in
                >> .75 caliber weapons unless the site says otherwise.
                >>
                >> John Thornton
                >>
                >> Loyalist Militia of Chatham County
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes book and movie reviews, a list
                of sutlers, RevList member photos, etc., at
                >
                >http://www.liming.org/revlist/
                >
                >
              • John Thornton
                And it s VERY dangerous. Esp. when elevated, as all the particles will come down on the opposed side like grapeshot. (wouldn t that be some volley...) The
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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                  And it's VERY dangerous. Esp. when elevated, as all the particles will
                  come
                  down on the opposed side like grapeshot. (wouldn't that be some volley...)
                  The blast, point blank, wouldn't exactly be pleasant either. And what
                  happens should somebody inadvertently double-load?..... 360 grains of BP
                  going off- hoo-ah!


                  Agreed on the DANGEROUS, but mostly in case of double load. The
                  'particles' however, pose no threat, as they are burning, and get consumed
                  within a few feet of the gun. (They SHOULD burn in the barrel, and if you
                  use 90-120 per load, they do.) Any that don't burn, have very little kinetic
                  energy, 'cause powder is light. Run the ballistics & velocities of something
                  the size & weight of powder, & you'd see they can;t travel very far. Now
                  rock salt, on the other hand....... (I am being HUMOROUS, one should never
                  <*fill in the blank here*> due to safety concerns.)


                  Wasn't there something in the BAR Dispatch last winter about the telltale
                  BOOM of a double loaded musket as opposed to the bang that a musket should
                  make when properly loaded with 90- 110 grains? BTW for those who aren't
                  used
                  to muskets with live loads, they sound much as the reenactment variety
                  (powder only) do, just a sharper crack as the ball leaves the barrel.

                  A unit that loads muskets with 180 grains of powder each... who are these
                  yahoos? Keep 'em away from me.
                  Roger


                  I'll politely decline to mention them, as it's been about 10-12 years
                  since I was in that unit. I do not know what they currently use, or know
                  what their current regulations are, and I would not to like have things held
                  against ME that I did years ago, before I became perfect. ;-)

                  John

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Todd Post <tpost@...>
                  To: Revlist@egroups.com <Revlist@egroups.com>
                  Date: 02 August 2000 12:17
                  Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?


                  >180? Yikes! I'm sure some would say that is a safety concern, but for
                  me
                  >it's more of a waste of powder. There is a point of diminishing return
                  >where the "pop" is as loud as it's going to get without ramming.
                  >
                  >Todd
                  >
                  >> From: "John Thornton" <jt@...>
                  >> Reply-To: Revlist@egroups.com
                  >> Date: Wed, 2 Aug 2000 12:15:14 -0400
                  >> To: <Revlist@egroups.com>
                  >> Subject: RE: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?
                  >>
                  >> I've been in units where 180 was the normal, but that's a lot of
                  powder.
                  A
                  >> lot of events specify, usually about 100 grains. Check your event
                  >> invitation. Our unit has no required size, but we shoot between 100-120
                  in
                  >> .75 caliber weapons unless the site says otherwise.
                  >>
                  >> John Thornton
                  >>
                  >> Loyalist Militia of Chatham County
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes book and movie reviews, a list
                  of sutlers, RevList member photos, etc., at
                  >
                  >http://www.liming.org/revlist/
                  >
                  >



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                  Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes book and movie reviews, a list
                  of sutlers, RevList member photos, etc., at

                  http://www.liming.org/revlist/



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Neil Skorka
                  Hi there everybody, Isn t there some sort of cartridge box, I ... I know that the French cartridge box blocks have 6 holes in the middle, 2x3, and 2 cavities
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 2, 2000
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                    Hi there everybody,

                    Isn't there some sort of cartridge box, I
                    > forget the name, that has
                    > an open rectangle in the middle and six holes on
                    > either side? That
                    > prompted our method of packaging the cartridges, as
                    > a packet would fit
                    > nicely in that space.

                    I know that the French cartridge box blocks have 6
                    holes in the middle, 2x3, and 2 cavities for packets
                    on either side. These are accurate, but in battle I'd
                    rather have all my cartridges, or at least the first
                    24 rounds, in individual holes. Right now in
                    Saintonge we don't allow the 6 hole blocks for safety
                    reasons of the whole packet falling out of your box,
                    instead they are replaced with 20-24 hole blocks.

                    =====
                    Neil A Skorka
                    2nd NJ Reg't Helms Coy
                    85eme Reg't de Saintonge

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                  • Jay Callaham
                    ... From: Todd Post To: Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 12:16 PM Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 3, 2000
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                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Todd Post" <tpost@...>
                      To: <Revlist@egroups.com>
                      Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 12:16 PM
                      Subject: Re: [Revlist] Re: How to roll Catridges?


                      > 180? Yikes! I'm sure some would say that is a safety concern, but for me
                      > it's more of a waste of powder. There is a point of diminishing return
                      > where the "pop" is as loud as it's going to get without ramming.

                      Generally I try to stay at about 110 to 120 in a Bess. The reason is that at
                      that loading I get a noticeable recoil and KNOW when it's gone off or not in
                      a good volley. That helps prevent double loading. More than that does pretty
                      much as Todd says - not much more sound until you get the distinctive "boom"
                      of a severe overload. Less than that and it's easy to not notice a misfire
                      if a good volley goes off. I don't always think to look for smoke coming
                      from the touchole after each round, but I DO notice recoil or lack of same.

                      Jay
                      4th Coy, Bde of Guards
                      jay-callaham@...
                      "If you do not receive this, it must have miscarried, therefore I beg you
                      write and let me know." Sir Boyle Roche, 18th century Irish MP with a
                      vision!
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