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Fate of the Signers

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  • bvogler
    List- This email was sent to me some years ago, but after a bit of editing, it is worth forwarding to the List on the 4th of July.Happy Birth Day America !!
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 3, 2013
      List-

      This email was sent to me some years ago, but after a bit of editing, it is
      worth forwarding to the List on the 4th of July.Happy Birth Day America !!



      Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the
      Declaration of Independence?



      Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before
      they died.



      Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in
      the American Army; another had two sons captured. Nine of the 56 fought and
      died from wounds or hardships of the American War for independence.



      They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred
      honor.



      What kind of men were they?



      Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
      farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they
      signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty
      would be death if they were captured.



      Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships
      swept from the seas by the Royal Navy. He sold his home and properties to
      pay his debts, and died in rags.



      Thomas McKean was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his
      family constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
      was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was
      his reward.



      Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Ellery, Hall, Clymer, Walton,
      Gwinnett, Heyward, Rutledge, and Middleton.



      At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British had
      taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
      Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.



      Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his
      wife, and she died with a few months.



      John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
      children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
      waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home
      to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died
      from exhaustion and a broken heart.



      Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.



      Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were
      not wild-eyed rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means
      and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing
      tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: "For the support of this
      declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence,
      we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred
      honor."



      They gave you and me a free and independent America.



      Some take their liberties for granted, but we shouldn't. So, take a few
      minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these
      patriots.



      The doorway to freedom is framed in muskets!



      And so it goes,

      Bob V.













      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Clines
      I normally wouldn t comment on something like this but on this group where we pride ourselves on being as historically accurate, I have to say something Only
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
        I normally wouldn't comment on something like this but on this group
        where we pride ourselves on being as historically accurate, I have to say
        something

        Only parts of this is true and it is mostly "spin" written over the internet
        to fool people that don't know better

        This letter is copied here and dissected for accuracy
        http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp

        John







        -----Original Message-----
        From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Revlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        bvogler
        Sent: Wednesday, July 03, 2013 10:49 PM
        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Revlist] Fate of the Signers

        List-

        This email was sent to me some years ago, but after a bit of editing, it is
        worth forwarding to the List on the 4th of July.Happy Birth Day America !!



        Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the
        Declaration of Independence?



        Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before
        they died.



        Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in
        the American Army; another had two sons captured. Nine of the 56 fought and
        died from wounds or hardships of the American War for independence.



        They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred
        honor.



        What kind of men were they?



        Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
        farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they
        signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty
        would be death if they were captured.



        Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships
        swept from the seas by the Royal Navy. He sold his home and properties to
        pay his debts, and died in rags.



        Thomas McKean was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his
        family constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
        was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was
        his reward.



        Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Ellery, Hall, Clymer, Walton,
        Gwinnett, Heyward, Rutledge, and Middleton.



        At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British had
        taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
        Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.



        Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his
        wife, and she died with a few months.



        John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
        children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
        waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home
        to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died
        from exhaustion and a broken heart.



        Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.



        Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were
        not wild-eyed rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means
        and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing
        tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: "For the support of this
        declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence,
        we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred
        honor."



        They gave you and me a free and independent America.



        Some take their liberties for granted, but we shouldn't. So, take a few
        minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these
        patriots.



        The doorway to freedom is framed in muskets!



        And so it goes,

        Bob V.













        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/ and click "Join This Group!"

        TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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      • ASHLEY G MORGAN
        Reminds me of something my Dad told many years ago, believe half of what you read and even less of what you hear. Has proved to be valuable advice. Ashley
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
          Reminds me of something my Dad told many years ago, "believe half of what
          you read and even less of what you hear." Has proved to be valuable advice.



          Ashley Morgan

          Pensioner

          84th Regt of Foot

          2nd Virginia Regt

          Maryland Loyalist Battn



          From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Revlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          John Clines
          Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2013 8:44 AM
          To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [Revlist] Fate of the Signers





          I normally wouldn't comment on something like this but on this group
          where we pride ourselves on being as historically accurate, I have to say
          something

          Only parts of this is true and it is mostly "spin" written over the internet
          to fool people that don't know better

          This letter is copied here and dissected for accuracy
          http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp

          John

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com>
          [mailto:Revlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
          Behalf Of
          bvogler
          Sent: Wednesday, July 03, 2013 10:49 PM
          To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [Revlist] Fate of the Signers

          List-

          This email was sent to me some years ago, but after a bit of editing, it is
          worth forwarding to the List on the 4th of July.Happy Birth Day America !!

          Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the
          Declaration of Independence?

          Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before
          they died.

          Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in
          the American Army; another had two sons captured. Nine of the 56 fought and
          died from wounds or hardships of the American War for independence.

          They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred
          honor.

          What kind of men were they?

          Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
          farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they
          signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty
          would be death if they were captured.

          Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships
          swept from the seas by the Royal Navy. He sold his home and properties to
          pay his debts, and died in rags.

          Thomas McKean was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his
          family constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
          was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was
          his reward.

          Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Ellery, Hall, Clymer, Walton,
          Gwinnett, Heyward, Rutledge, and Middleton.

          At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British had
          taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
          Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

          Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his
          wife, and she died with a few months.

          John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
          children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
          waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home
          to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died
          from exhaustion and a broken heart.

          Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

          Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were
          not wild-eyed rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means
          and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing
          tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: "For the support of this
          declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence,
          we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred
          honor."

          They gave you and me a free and independent America.

          Some take their liberties for granted, but we shouldn't. So, take a few
          minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these
          patriots.

          The doorway to freedom is framed in muskets!

          And so it goes,

          Bob V.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          ------------------------------------

          To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/ and click "Join This Group!"

          TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:Revlist-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>

          with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.Yahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • bvogler
          List- As someone who also believes in being historically accurate as possible, my humble apologies for the inaccuracies of Fate of the Signers. Bob V. This
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
            List-

            As someone who also believes in being historically accurate as possible, my
            humble apologies for the inaccuracies of "Fate of the Signers."



            Bob V.

            "This is the West, Sir. When the Legend becomes fact, print the legend."

            From "The Man Who Killed Liberty Valance"

            -----------------------------



            >>>Reminds me of something my Dad told many years ago, "believe half of what
            you read and even less of what you hear." Has proved to be valuable advice.

            Ashley Morgan

            Pensioner
            84th Regt of Foot
            2nd Virginia Regt
            Maryland Loyalist Battn

            ------------------------


            John Clines
            Subject: RE: [Revlist] Fate of the Signers

            I normally wouldn't comment on something like this but on this group
            where we pride ourselves on being as historically accurate, I have to say
            something

            Only parts of this is true and it is mostly "spin" written over the internet
            to fool people that don't know better

            This letter is copied here and dissected for accuracy
            http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp

            John

            ---------------------------

            List-

            This email was sent to me some years ago, but after a bit of editing, it is
            worth forwarding to the List on the 4th of July.Happy Birth Day America !!

            Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the
            Declaration of Independence?

            Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before
            they died.

            Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in
            the American Army; another had two sons captured. Nine of the 56 fought and
            died from wounds or hardships of the American War for independence.

            They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred
            honor.

            What kind of men were they?

            Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
            farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they
            signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty
            would be death if they were captured.

            Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships
            swept from the seas by the Royal Navy. He sold his home and properties to
            pay his debts, and died in rags.

            Thomas McKean was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his
            family constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
            was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was
            his reward.

            Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Ellery, Hall, Clymer, Walton,
            Gwinnett, Heyward, Rutledge, and Middleton.

            At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British had
            taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
            Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

            Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his
            wife, and she died with a few months.

            John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
            children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
            waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home
            to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died
            from exhaustion and a broken heart.

            Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

            Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were
            not wild-eyed rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means
            and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing
            tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: "For the support of this
            declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence,
            we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred
            honor."

            They gave you and me a free and independent America.

            Some take their liberties for granted, but we shouldn't. So, take a few
            minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these
            patriots.

            The doorway to freedom is framed in muskets!

            And so it goes,

            Bob V.

            [





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Boston 1775
            Here s another dissection of the Price They Paid essay: The case of Richard Stockton of
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
              Here's another dissection of the "Price They Paid" essay:
              <<http://www.connecticutsar.org/articles/price_paid.htm#rebuttal>>

              The case of Richard Stockton of New Jersey is especially interesting. In the early 1800s a story developed that he had been mistreated as a prisoner and died of the lingering effects. Eventually that was blown up into a story of torture and early death.

              Evidence from the 1700s shows that Stockton:
              a) spent less than thirteen weeks in late 1776 and early 1777 as a captive of the royal forces, probably far less.
              b) was said by his son-in-law, Dr. Benjamin Rush, to have fully recovered, and was busy buying furniture within weeks of returning to his home.
              c) died of an oral cancer, not a condition we can link to mistreatment.
              d) was not described at his death as having been mistreated in captivity.
              e) while a prisoner signed an agreement to live in peaceful obedience to the Crown, so the Howe brothers ordered him to be set free. He then sat out the rest of the conflict as a neutral.

              But because of the late-1800s legend, Stockton is supposedly the prime example of a Declaration signer being hunted down by the British army and tortured.

              J. L. Bell Boston1775@...

              Unabashed gossip about the start of the American Revolution at <http://www.boston1775.net>.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Todd Braisted
              I have a 29 December 1776 document from the Force Papers, a letter from Lt. Col. James Webster of the 33rd Regiment to Lt. Col. Elisha Lawrence of the 1st
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
                I have a 29 December 1776 document from the Force Papers, a letter from Lt. Col. James Webster of the 33rd Regiment to Lt. Col. Elisha Lawrence of the 1st Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers, stating that Stockton had been granted a full pardon by the Howe brothers, and all his property in NJV hands was to be returned to him. Hardly sounds like the legend...

                Todd Braisted
                ivbnnjv@...



                -----Original Message-----
                From: Boston 1775 <Boston1775@...>
                To: Revlist <Revlist@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thu, Jul 4, 2013 9:45 am
                Subject: [Revlist] Re: Fate of the Signers






                Here's another dissection of the "Price They Paid" essay:
                <<http://www.connecticutsar.org/articles/price_paid.htm#rebuttal>>

                The case of Richard Stockton of New Jersey is especially interesting. In the early 1800s a story developed that he had been mistreated as a prisoner and died of the lingering effects. Eventually that was blown up into a story of torture and early death.

                Evidence from the 1700s shows that Stockton:
                a) spent less than thirteen weeks in late 1776 and early 1777 as a captive of the royal forces, probably far less.
                b) was said by his son-in-law, Dr. Benjamin Rush, to have fully recovered, and was busy buying furniture within weeks of returning to his home.
                c) died of an oral cancer, not a condition we can link to mistreatment.
                d) was not described at his death as having been mistreated in captivity.
                e) while a prisoner signed an agreement to live in peaceful obedience to the Crown, so the Howe brothers ordered him to be set free. He then sat out the rest of the conflict as a neutral.

                But because of the late-1800s legend, Stockton is supposedly the prime example of a Declaration signer being hunted down by the British army and tortured.

                J. L. Bell Boston1775@...

                Unabashed gossip about the start of the American Revolution at <http://www.boston1775.net>.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • jno23x
                Todd Braisted wrote:
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 4, 2013
                  Todd Braisted wrote:
                  << I have a 29 December 1776 document from the Force Papers, a letter from Lt. Col. James Webster of the 33rd Regiment to Lt. Col. Elisha Lawrence of the 1st Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers, stating that Stockton had been granted a full pardon by the Howe brothers, and all his property in NJV hands was to be returned to him. Hardly sounds like the legend... >>

                  A few years back Todd generously shared his transcript and analysis of that document with me, and you can read it here:
                  <<http://boston1775.blogspot.com/2009/07/richard-stocktons-release-date.html>>

                  J. L. Bell Boston1775@...
                  Unabashed gossip about the start of the American Revolution at <http://www.boston1775.net>.
                • D Mangum
                  Better to remember that the signers were humans, and like all humans they have their failings and flaws. Better to appreciate them for what they did, warts and
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 5, 2013
                    Better to remember that the signers were humans, and like all humans they have their failings and flaws. Better to appreciate them for what they did, warts and all, regardless of what happened after. And when we do look at what happened after, best to follow the words of Reagan..."Trust, but verify." 
                    Thanks to John for helping to clarify things.
                    Regards,
                    Douglas
                     
                    Douglas G. Mangum M.A.
                    Principal Investigator, Historian
                    Moore Archeological Consulting, Inc.



                    ________________________________
                    From: John Clines <59desoto@...>
                    To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, July 4, 2013 7:44 AM
                    Subject: RE: [Revlist] Fate of the Signers



                     
                    I normally wouldn't comment on something like this but on this group
                    where we pride ourselves on being as historically accurate, I have to say
                    something

                    Only parts of this is true and it is mostly "spin" written over the internet
                    to fool people that don't know better

                    This letter is copied here and dissected for accuracy
                    http://www.snopes.com/history/american/pricepaid.asp

                    John

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Revlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    bvogler
                    Sent: Wednesday, July 03, 2013 10:49 PM
                    To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Revlist] Fate of the Signers

                    List-

                    This email was sent to me some years ago, but after a bit of editing, it is
                    worth forwarding to the List on the 4th of July.Happy Birth Day America !!

                    Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the
                    Declaration of Independence?

                    Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before
                    they died.

                    Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in
                    the American Army; another had two sons captured. Nine of the 56 fought and
                    died from wounds or hardships of the American War for independence.

                    They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred
                    honor.

                    What kind of men were they?

                    Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were
                    farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they
                    signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty
                    would be death if they were captured.

                    Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships
                    swept from the seas by the Royal Navy. He sold his home and properties to
                    pay his debts, and died in rags.

                    Thomas McKean was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his
                    family constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family
                    was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was
                    his reward.

                    Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Ellery, Hall, Clymer, Walton,
                    Gwinnett, Heyward, Rutledge, and Middleton.

                    At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British had
                    taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General
                    Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

                    Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his
                    wife, and she died with a few months.

                    John Hart was driven from his wife's bedside as she was dying. Their 13
                    children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to
                    waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home
                    to find his wife dead and his children vanished. A few weeks later he died
                    from exhaustion and a broken heart.

                    Norris and Livingston suffered similar fates.

                    Such were the stories and sacrifices of the American Revolution. These were
                    not wild-eyed rabble-rousing ruffians. They were soft-spoken men of means
                    and education. They had security, but they valued liberty more. Standing
                    tall, straight, and unwavering, they pledged: "For the support of this
                    declaration, with firm reliance on the protection of the divine providence,
                    we mutually pledge to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred
                    honor."

                    They gave you and me a free and independent America.

                    Some take their liberties for granted, but we shouldn't. So, take a few
                    minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these
                    patriots.

                    The doorway to freedom is framed in muskets!

                    And so it goes,

                    Bob V.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    ------------------------------------

                    To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/ and click "Join This Group!"

                    TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.Yahoo! Groups Links




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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