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Re: Fix Bayonets question

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  • jackfortune
    Paul-greetings, Might that anecdote not represent the infantry marching to contact with all speed -perhaps doubling?- then fixing their bayonets before going
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 28, 2013
      Paul-greetings,

      Might that anecdote not represent the infantry marching to contact "with all speed"-perhaps doubling?- then fixing their bayonets before going into action? That's as opposed to advancing on the enemy and pausing to fix their bayonets before closing.

      An interesting observation regarding the 42nd requiring rescue. Wasn't that more or less Brig. McAuliffe's comment on being informed that the 101st Airborne had been rescued by Patton's Third Army?

      JF

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, PAUL & LAURA PACE <paullaurapace@...> wrote:
      >
      > Don and List - I just happened upon a letter from an officer of the 10th at Fort Washington, that reports the regiments from Earl Percy's forces advanced till they found the rebel line,  formed up, then fixed bayonets as follows:
      >  
      > A letter from an Officer of the 10th regiment to his friend in town, and who was at the taking of Fort Washington, &c. says, that “the courage and conduct on that day, as well as in all engagements in America, cannot be too much applauded, of that brave and valiant nobleman the Earl of Percy, and his second in command Major General Vol. [Valentine] Jones.  His Lordship had under his command on the 16th of Nov. the 10th, 37th, 38th, and 52d regiments, and was placed in flank [sic] of the fort, on the New  York side;  â€" a  messenger arrived and informed his Lordship, that the royal regiment of Highlanders was on the brink of being surrounded by the rebels, upon which he ordered Gen. Jones to march with all speed, and place the 10th and 52d regiments between the Highlanders and the enemy;  he had the good fortune to arrive in time, and to form his regiments in front of the rebels, though without a single cannon, and ordered his men to fix their
      > bayonets, and advance to close quarters; upon which the rebels not chusing to engage them with such weapons, turned their backs and ran to the fort as fast as they could.”
      >              Source: Morning Post and Daily Advertiser, Jan. 11, 1777, p. 2.
      >  
      >  
      > Since the 42nd had already scaled the heights from Harlem Creek, crossed the island all the way to the Hudson, captured Washington's HQ at the Morris house and captured 170 prisoners, before Percy showed up, this account crediting His Lordship with rescuing the 42nd  may be a just a wee bit off.
      >  
      > Paul Pace
      > late Captn, 42d Lt Infy Compy
      >
      >
      > --- On Wed, 2/20/13, donhagist <dhagist@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: donhagist <dhagist@...>
      > Subject: [Revlist] Fix Bayonets question
      > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 12:05 PM
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      >  
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      > A while ago I was asked to critique a draft of a historical novel for technical accuracy. In a battle scene, fear was struck into the militia when the regulars they were fighting stopped and fixed their bayonets. I flagged this as an inaccuracy, contending that troops typically fixed their bayonets before going into battle, not in the midst of a fight; the author was misled by watching reenactors who, for safety reasons, generally do not fix bayonets until they are preparing for a charge.
      >
      > Upon reflection, I wonder if I'm right about this. I think I am, but would like other input. Can anyone cite cases of troops stopping to fix their bayonets while in battle (during the American Revolution; please leave other time periods out of it) rather than having them fixed beforehand?
      >
      > Don N. Hagist
      > http://revolutionaryimprints.com
      > http://redcoat76.blogspot.com
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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