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French burials in Boston

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  • robertaselig@juno.com
    Salut - in mid-July 1780, the Ile de France carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment put into Boston. A few days later, those able to walk marched off to
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 12, 2013
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      Salut - in mid-July 1780, the "Ile de France" carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment put into Boston. A few days later, those able to walk marched off to Newport, RI, but over the next few weeks, close to 20 men died. I have their names, biographical data and death dates. In the summer of 1780, Boston was not exactly dotted with Catholic churches and cemeteries served by Roman priests. But you could not just throw those dead soldiers in the harbor either. So my question: what is the most likely burying ground for those men? Thanks - Bob Selig
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    • Thomas Heim
      I m just throwing a stone in the well here but my guess is Boston s Central Burial Ground. This is what s listed on their website; Within Boston
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 12, 2013
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        I'm just throwing a stone in the well here but my guess is Boston's Central Burial Ground. This is what's listed on their website;


        Within Boston Common<http://www.celebrateboston.com/boston-common.htm> at Tremont and Boylston Streets is the old Central Burying Ground. The town purchased the land for the cemetery in 1756. The earliest burials here were likely those of foreigners who died in Boston, and of poor people. During the American Revolution, the British had buried their dead from the Battle of Bunker Hill, and soldier's who died of disease during the subsequent winter occupation of Boston, in a trench on the northwest corner of the burying ground.

        Brick and stone tombs were built on the Boylston Street side beginning in 1793. Many burials were done here between 1795 and 1815. In 1836, the Boylston Street Mall was laid out (walkway lined with trees on both sides). Any obstructing graves that were unclaimed by ancestors were buried under this new walkway, and a line of tombs was built on the other side of the grounds for some of the displaced tombs.

        [Central Burying Ground Mass Grave Marker]
        Mass Grave Marker

        Brick and stone tombs were built on the Boylston Street side beginning in 1793. Many burials were done here between 1795 and 1815. In 1836, the Boylston Street Mall was laid out (walkway lined with trees on both sides). Any obstructing graves that were unclaimed by ancestors were buried under this new walkway, and a line of tombs was built on the other side of the grounds for some of the displaced tombs.

        While constructing the subway under Boylston Street in 1894, the remains of about 910 people were unearthed. Several tombs that had been buried in 1836 were uncovered, which served as the receptacles for bones of other graves in the surrounding area. The remains were re-interred in 1895, and a slate tablet with three boundary stones, was placed to mark the spot.

        Monseur Jean Baptiste Julien, the noted Boston restauranteur who created Julien Soup, was buried here in 1805 (unsure if marker still exists). Gilbert Stuart<http://www.celebrateboston.com/biography/gilbert-stuart.htm>, the famous portrait artist that painted George Washington, is also buried here (in tomb #61, a marker was placed along the fence on the Boston Common side). Samuel Sprague<http://www.celebrateboston.com/biography/samuel-sprague.htm>, a participant in the Boston Tea Party<http://www.celebrateboston.com/sites/boston-tea-party.htm> and soldier in the Revolution, and Charles Sprague<http://www.celebrateboston.com/biography/charles-sprague.htm>, the famous nineteenth century poet, rests in Tomb #5.

        Many French Roman Catholics, then the earliest immigrants, are buried in Central Burying Ground. Sadly, many young children are buried here. A number of stones have poetry from the period, and below is a poem from a marker of three children in the Fefsenden family:


        Hail sweet repose now shall we rest
        No more with sickness be distressed
        Here from all sorrow find release
        Our souls shall dwell in endless peace

        ________________________________
        From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com [Revlist@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of robertaselig@... [robertaselig@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 9:18 PM
        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com; BrigadeAmRev@yahoogroups.com; saintonge_chat@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Revlist] French burials in Boston



        Salut - in mid-July 1780, the "Ile de France" carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment put into Boston. A few days later, those able to walk marched off to Newport, RI, but over the next few weeks, close to 20 men died. I have their names, biographical data and death dates. In the summer of 1780, Boston was not exactly dotted with Catholic churches and cemeteries served by Roman priests. But you could not just throw those dead soldiers in the harbor either. So my question: what is the most likely burying ground for those men? Thanks - Bob Selig
        __________________________________________________________
        How to Sleep Like a Rock
        Obey this one natural trick to fall asleep and stay asleep all night.
        http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/511af835303817835729cst02duc

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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      • Lee Boyle
        The Chevalier de Saint Sauveur was killed in a riot in Boston in September 1778, and buried at King s Chapel, even though it was not a Catholic cemetery.
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 15, 2013
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          The Chevalier de Saint Sauveur was killed in a riot in Boston in September 1778, and buried at King's Chapel, even though it was not a Catholic cemetery. Don't know the Chevalier's religion.
           
          Lee Boyle


          ________________________________
          From: "robertaselig@..." <robertaselig@...>
          To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com; BrigadeAmRev@yahoogroups.com; saintonge_chat@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 9:18 PM
          Subject: [Revlist] French burials in Boston


           

          Salut - in mid-July 1780, the "Ile de France" carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment put into Boston. A few days later, those able to walk marched off to Newport, RI, but over the next few weeks, close to 20 men died. I have their names, biographical data and death dates. In the summer of 1780, Boston was not exactly dotted with Catholic churches and cemeteries served by Roman priests. But you could not just throw those dead soldiers in the harbor either. So my question: what is the most likely burying ground for those men? Thanks - Bob Selig
          __________________________________________________________
          How to Sleep Like a Rock
          Obey this one natural trick to fall asleep and stay asleep all night.
          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/511af835303817835729cst02duc

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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        • robertaselig@juno.com
          Lee - if anything then the good chevalier was catholic. Bob======== ... From: Lee Boyle To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 17, 2013
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            Lee - if anything then the good chevalier was catholic. Bob========

            ---------- Original Message ----------
            From: Lee Boyle <mordecaigist@...>
            To: "Revlist@yahoogroups.com" <Revlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: Re: [Revlist] French burials in Boston
            Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2013 18:01:29 -0800 (PST)


            <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
            The Chevalier de Saint Sauveur was killed in a riot in Boston in September 1778, and buried at King's Chapel, even though it was not a Catholic cemetery. Don't know the Chevalier's religion.

            Lee Boyle


            ________________________________
            From: "robertaselig@..." robertaselig@...>
            To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com; BrigadeAmRev@yahoogroups.com; saintonge_chat@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 9:18 PM
            Subject: [Revlist] French burials in Boston




            Salut - in mid-July 1780, the "Ile de France" carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment put into Boston. A few days later, those able to walk marched off to Newport, RI, but over the next few weeks, close to 20 men died. I have their names, biographical data and death dates. In the summer of 1780, Boston was not exactly dotted with Catholic churches and cemeteries served by Roman priests. But you could not just throw those dead soldiers in the harbor either. So my question: what is the most likely burying ground for those men? Thanks - Bob Selig
            __________________________________________________________
            How to Sleep Like a Rock
            Obey this one natural trick to fall asleep and stay asleep all night.
            http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/511af835303817835729cst02duc

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            ____________________________________________________________
            Woman is 53 But Looks 25
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          • Thomas Heim
            Off subject here but what unit was the 68th French Regiment during the American Revolution? One of our guys found a button on line and I want to get a
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 19, 2013
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              Off subject here but what unit was the 68th French Regiment during the American Revolution? One of our guys found a button on line and I want to get a confirmation other than Wikipedia. That tends to be an unreliable source at times.

              Many thanks....


              Sent from my iPod

              On Feb 17, 2013, at 11:51 AM, "robertaselig@...<mailto:robertaselig@...>" <robertaselig@...<mailto:robertaselig@...>> wrote:



              Lee - if anything then the good chevalier was catholic. Bob========

              ---------- Original Message ----------
              From: Lee Boyle mordecaigist@...<mailto:mordecaigist%40yahoo.com>>
              To: "Revlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com>" Revlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com>>
              Subject: Re: [Revlist] French burials in Boston
              Date: Fri, 15 Feb 2013 18:01:29 -0800 (PST)

              http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
              The Chevalier de Saint Sauveur was killed in a riot in Boston in September 1778, and buried at King's Chapel, even though it was not a Catholic cemetery. Don't know the Chevalier's religion.

              Lee Boyle

              ________________________________
              From: "robertaselig@...<mailto:robertaselig%40juno.com>robertaselig@...<mailto:robertaselig%40juno.com>>
              To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com>; BrigadeAmRev@yahoogroups.com<mailto:BrigadeAmRev%40yahoogroups.com>; saintonge_chat@yahoogroups.com<mailto:saintonge_chat%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 9:18 PM
              Subject: [Revlist] French burials in Boston

              Salut - in mid-July 1780, the "Ile de France" carrying 350 men of the Bourbonnois Regiment put into Boston. A few days later, those able to walk marched off to Newport, RI, but over the next few weeks, close to 20 men died. I have their names, biographical data and death dates. In the summer of 1780, Boston was not exactly dotted with Catholic churches and cemeteries served by Roman priests. But you could not just throw those dead soldiers in the harbor either. So my question: what is the most likely burying ground for those men? Thanks - Bob Selig
              __________________________________________________________
              How to Sleep Like a Rock
              Obey this one natural trick to fall asleep and stay asleep all night.
              http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/511af835303817835729cst02duc

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              __________________________________________________________
              Woman is 53 But Looks 25
              Mom reveals 1 simple wrinkle trick that has angered doctors...
              http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/51210a4694cf7a465abdst04duc

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