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Re: Brewers pitch removal

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  • gcobrien
    Thanks for the suggestion Dave. That worked very well. Now I can see that the discoloration is actually a series of air pockets in a bead of glue. I m thinking
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 6, 2012
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      Thanks for the suggestion Dave. That worked very well. Now I can see that the discoloration is actually a series of air pockets in a bead of glue. I'm thinking of fabricating a tool to cut/scrape as much of that stuff out as I can before I recoat with pitch.

      For the benefit of anyone else, Jason Townsend has a short simple video tutorial on relining with brewers pitch.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtJuHU9nLtU&list=UUxr2d4As312LulcajAkKJYw&index=142&feature=plcp

      Thanks again for your suggestion Dave. I appreciate the help.
      cheers,
      Gary

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Woolsey, David" <David.Woolsey@...> wrote:
      >
      > Put it in the oven at 250 degrees in a baking pan so the pitch doesn't drip inside the oven. Wood gives off flamable gas at above 400 degrees. Most of the pitch will melt out. Understand some folks have made those style canteens with epoxy then pitch thinking the pitch will keep the water from the adhesive. The adhesive though will sometimes discolor from the wood and metal pins and so will the pitch even if no epoxy was used.
      >
      > YOHS
      >
      > Dave Woolsey.
      >
      >
      > From: gcobrien [mailto:gcobrien@...]
      > Sent: Friday, October 05, 2012 11:54 PM
      > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com <Revlist@yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [Revlist] Brewers pitch removal
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I have a cheesebox canteen that leaks and the pitch inside appears to have dark spots along the inner edges. Is there a practical way to remove the pitch from the interior without using harsh chemicals like acetone, napthalene, etc?
      > I have tried boiling water with very limited results. Would prefer to safely remove as much as possible before attempting to re-coat. Anyone have any experience in dealing with this?
      > Any help much appreciated.
      > Gary O'Brien
      > 1Va Rgt.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Douglas Butler
      I tried the same with a leather Jackware canteen (oven at 250F) and unfortunately the canteen shriveled up like a prune. I think this one is unrecoverable,
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 7, 2012
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        I tried the same with a leather Jackware canteen (oven at 250F) and unfortunately the canteen shriveled up like a prune. I think this one is unrecoverable, but for the future what do others do when a Jackware canteen starts to leak? I had relined it by just pouring pitch in and dumping it out but I lost a lot of volume that way and the neck got real small.

        SherpaDoug
        YMM
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