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Re: Camp Kitchens at Rockford

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  • Andrew Watson Kirk
    Nail on the head, Niels. Specifically, the type specified by Bland. First, you draw a Circle or Square on the Ground of what Dimension you please, after that
    Message 1 of 50 , Jun 1, 2012
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      Nail on the head, Niels.

      Specifically, the type specified by Bland.

      "First, you draw a Circle or Square on the Ground of what Dimension you please, after
      that you dig a Trench or Ditch round it of about 3 or 4 Foot broad, and 2 deep, by
      which it will resemble the Bottom of a Cock-pit. When this is done, you are then to cut
      Holes or Niches in the Side of the Circle or Square of Earth which is left stand-ing with
      the Ditch. These Holes may be about a Foot square, the upper Part of which should be
      within 3 or 4 of the Surface, from whence they are to cut small Holes of 4 Inches
      Diameter, down to the great ones, in which the Fire is to be made, and the Heat
      convey'd thro' the small Holes to the Bottom of the Kettles which are placed on the Top
      of them. These Fire-places may be made 3 or 4 Foot of one another, quite round the
      said Circle or Square; and if you erect one of these Kitchens, (by which I mean an
      entire Circle of Square) for each Troop or Company, they need not be larger than what
      will con-tain as many Fire-places as you have Tents Pitched for your Troop or
      Company; for as all the Men who lie in a Tent are of one Mess, every Mess must
      therefore have a Fire-place, that they may have no Excuse for their not boiling the Pot
      every day."

      just wondering if there's a place for the...ahem...lighter packers out there to dress their victuals.

      Andrew Kirk



      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "gourdidol" <hamavos.niels@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'd imagine he's referring to any of those.
      > Something a little less like the proverbial Williamsburg-on-Wheels and more like, well... any of those on your list, or any of the large number of points in between.
      >
      > Even the Hyde Park camps aren't as "adorned" as the typical event kitchens.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "britmarinecapt" <britmarinecapt@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > OK Mister Kirk, you got me. What is a "documentable" style camp kitchen? Do you mean a permanent camp like a Hyde Park, and advanced training camp, or a temporary camp like they made during the marches of the Brandywine campaign or in the Southern campaigns?
      > >
      > > Jim McG
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Watson Kirk" <awkirk243@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Perhaps I missed this so excuse this if it is redundant.
      > > >
      > > > Are there going to be documentable style camp kitchens at rock ford in the brit camp?
      > > >
      > > > -A.w.Kirk
      > > > 43d Regt
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Robert Aldridge
      artillery and/or engineers would have had prybars, they are good for digging holes.. ________________________________ From: ebolton123
      Message 50 of 50 , Jun 11, 2012
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        artillery and/or engineers would have had prybars, they are good for digging holes..



        ________________________________
        From: ebolton123 <ebolton123@...>
        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, June 11, 2012 5:16 PM
        Subject: [Revlist] Re: Camp Kitchen



         

        Greg,
        How 'bout the soldiers bayonet? Seems that would easily work as a tool to punch out a chimney.
        Cheers,
        Bob Bolton
        Pa. Associators

        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "gregsandor" <gregsandor@...> wrote:
        >
        > Conducted an experiment this weekend at a B.A.R. Northwest Dep.t event on private land in Ohio with modern tools: shovel, spade, mattock, and post hole digger.
        >
        > At 6:30 p.m began cutting a rectangle in the grass with the shovel. Once the sod put aside alternated mattock and shovel. The soil is very clay with lots of rocks and there hasn't been any rain recently.
        >
        > At about 8:00 or 8:30 p.m. (still plenty of light to see) had a trench about 4' by 2 1/2' by 2 1/2' deep. Two other guys showed up then and one used the post hole digger to cut two chimneys to a depth equal to the floor of the trench, the other cut two fireplaces with a spade. We were done by about 9 p.m.
        >
        > So three reenactors with hand tools cut a 2-fireplace kitchen in under three hours. I should add that I am inexperienced at digging and did it casually with more goofing around than a soldier might have done. With practice and callouses and a serious frame of mind, let alone softer soil, we could do it faster.
        >
        > We used it all weekend and the tiny amount of fuel required, even though we expected to use little, was still surprising. The best fuel was the dry groundfall twigs we found around the camp. We had a stack of firewood but only really used a dozen or so 3" or 4" diameter short logs to form a grate to hold the kettles; as they began burning we'd push them into the fire and replace with fresh.
        >
        > Had we really been on the march and dug a kitchen like this, we would not have found seasoned firewood to begin with. The time spent on digging saved not having to even split dry logs (had we been lucky enough to find fallen trees near camp).
        >
        > So from this experience a couple questions arise:
        >
        > The army didn't have post-hold diggers. How did they cut the chimneys? Anyone have experience or ideas about that?
        >
        > How many reenactors, how much wood for the weekend?
        >
        > An army of any size would consume a great deal of wood in normal campfires; let's poll event organizers this summer to see how many cords of wood are burned at various reenactments, and that consumed by those who construct kitchens so we can compare.
        >
        > Photos are posted at http://5thvirginiaregt.wordpress.com/camp-kitchen/
        >
        >
        > Greg
        >




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