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Re: a question of aiming

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  • gourdidol
    Andrew / Alex - I ve also added an image to that same file of a rear sight engraved behind the breech of an original 1769 pattern firelock - this one with an
    Message 1 of 48 , Feb 2, 2012
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      Andrew / Alex -
      I've also added an image to that same file of a "rear sight" engraved behind the breech of an original 1769 pattern firelock - this one with an arrow engraved, not just a notch. I've seen at least two other examples of this, as well. Not sure if that's something a soldier with engraving expertise would do on his own or not (damaging the King's property! Zounds!).

      cheers,
      Niels

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Watson Kirk" <awkirk243@...> wrote:
      >
      > Mr. Bosch,
      >
      > See the photos I've just added.
      >
      > I too recall reading about the rear notch, where is that written?
      >
      > Andrew Watson Kirk
      > 43d Regt
      >
      > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Alexander Bosch" <lobster1768@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Mr. Hagist,
      > >
      > >
      > > I am very curious about the Notch at the Breech you mentioned. I have, a long Time ago, been looking for some Evidence for that but the Illustrations in the Books I own do rarely show the Breech from an Angle and in a Resolution that would allow identifying such a Notch. I'd be very happy, if you could help me out a bit on that Matter.
      > >
      > > with Regards,
      > >
      > > Alex
      > >
      >
    • John Welsh
      We use the word ³ball² to identify the shot from a musket (mousquette). In effect, both the words ³ball² and ³bullet² come from the French words
      Message 48 of 48 , Feb 10, 2012
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        We use the word ³ball² to identify the shot from a musket (mousquette). In
        effect, both the words ³ball² and ³bullet² come from the French words
        ³balle² and ³boulet². French military vocabulary was widely adopted by the
        British incorporated into English, including the rank structures (privat to
        general), verbs (attention, marche, charge, attaque, retraite), nouns
        (infanterie, cavalerie, artillerie), and organizations (escuade, peleton,
        compagnie, bataillon, regiment, corps, armee). It¹s said that some 40% of
        the English vocabulary came from French, due to the conquest and occupation
        of England in 1066 by king William the Conqueror (Ouillaume le Conquereur,
        duc de Normandie). The ultimate origin of French was Latin from the conquest
        by Julius Caesar as part of the Roman empire. Je vous salut.


        On 2/6/12 3:57 PM, "John Welsh" <jbwelsh@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Smooth bore muskets were deadly if fired by volley in line all at once, as
        > the windages overlapped to create a shotgun effect, a sheer wall of lead.
        > Hence marching, and linear conflict under officer control.
        >
        > On 2/6/12 3:14 PM, "ebolton123" <ebolton123@...
        > <mailto:ebolton123%40yahoo.com> > wrote:
        >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > Matt,
        >> > Did he actually use the word "vast"?
        >> > I always thought the "vast majority of history", man was fighting with
        >> > knives, and swords and spears. Does this guy really know his historical
        >> > timeline? If one only postured on an Ancient or Medievel battlefield, one
        >> was
        >> > likely (read guaranteed) to get one's head cleaved open.
        >> > During that "vast" majority of time there was no area to skulk on a
        >> > battlefield. There were very few rear area's to do said skulking. Battles
        >> > were bloodletting melee's. Skulking would have meant instant death by your
        >> > own side. Is this guy serious? With respect, I am beginning to think I
        >> > really don't need to read this book after all.
        >> > I think that if every man in the Continental Army had an '61 Springfield
        >> or a
        >> > Lee-Enfield, there would have been a helluva lot more dead Brits. I reject
        >> > that a change in doctrine had anything to do with it. The bloody
        >> smoothbore
        >> > just could'nt hit the broad side of a barn! When your standing 40 yards
        >> away
        >> > from a line of men that's trying to kill you, a person would have to have a
        >> > death wish or be a moron not to try to deliberatly shoot them first.
        >> > But that's just my opinion.
        >> > Cheers,
        >> > Bob Bolton
        >> > Pa. Associators
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com>
        >> <mailto:Revlist%40yahoogroups.com> , Matthew
        >> > Ehrlich <matt@...> wrote:
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > Dear Bob, et al.
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > *---I gotta get this book cause frankly I just don't get it? Does the
        >>>> LTC.,
        >>>> >> > have a combat background?*
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > If I recall correctly, the good LTC does not have combat experience,
        >>>> >> > admitting as much in the introduction. Nevertheless I think you'll
        find
        >>>> >> > the book is well-stocked with contemporary quotes and interviews, as
        well
        >>>> >> > as utilizing a great variety of more historical sources.
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > *--In the age of musketry I can see where an individual may be able to
        get
        >>>> >> > away with firing high if they so desired given the volley fire
        >>>> system...But
        >>>> >> > why would you? If you don't put that man down on the other side he
        will
        >>>> >> > likely put you down.....In later time periods, I have spoken to many
        >>>> >> > veterans from WWII-Iraq
        >>>> >> > *
        >>>> >> > It's a pity that I don't have the book in front of me (it's in
        >>>> California,
        >>>> >> > I'm in NY) but I found this article by him <<
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/hope_on_the_battlefield/>> and
        >>>> >> > it seems to be something of a summary of his central thesis. He posits
        that
        >>>> >> > throughout the vast majority of history, killing in wars was done by a
        >>>> >> > small minority whilst the rest 'postured,' by firing, making noise, or
        >>>> >> > engaging other useful front-line tasks. He cites a good deal of
        >>>> interesting
        >>>> >> > figures from the age of musketry through the Second World War (e.g.
        >>>> S.L.A.
        >>>> >> > Marshall's study of WWII front line combatants) and then claims that
        >>>> the US
        >>>> >> > army particularly was able to highly increase the rate of accurate and
        >>>> >> > deadly fire from troops by changing the psychology behind their
        >>>> training
        >>>> >> > methods prior to Vietnam, which would explain why many of the people
        >>>> you've
        >>>> >> > spoken to would have been more 'effective' in the field than a soldier
        of
        >>>> >> > the Revolutionary War.
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > At any rate, I cannot do adequate justice to his thesis. Whether you
        >>>> >> > eventually agree with it or disagree with it, I still think it's worth
        the
        >>>> >> > read!
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > Cheers!
        >>>> >> > Matt Ehrlich
        >>>> >> > (Pte. McGee,
        >>>> >> > HM 33rd Regiment
        >>>> >> > Cols. Coy)
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> >
        >>>> >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >>>> >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >



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