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Improvements (was Re: Guilford Court House Observations)

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  • Todd Post
    Mike, I agree with most of what you say about the types of events and how for me, battle events that recreate an actual event have a special place. When people
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 23, 2011
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      Mike,

      I agree with most of what you say about the types of events and how for me, battle events that recreate an actual event have a special place. When people get on me for not making a generic or immersion event my #1 priority, I say that for me the most interesting events in the hobby are ones that recreate an actual event, as close to the actual site as possible, as close to the actual date as possible, with participants who adapt their impression to recreate what was present at the battle as much as possible.

      You lost me though with this statement:

      > But we have to be realistic as well and realize that there are limits
      > to what we can do with this event.

      I disagree. You can always take steps to address things, it's just a matter of how far are you willing to go.

      > We can't eradicate the joggers.

      Sure we can. We have muskets, cannon, swords and bayonets...what do they have? <G> Seriously though, crowd control simply requires sites restricting the area being used and enforcing it either with park staff, volunteers, or noncombatant participants. Combined with some yellow tape, rope, chevaux de frise or caltrops, this really shouldn't be too hard.

      > We've never been able to stop the rude/selfish reenactor from
      > driving into camp after hours.

      Sure we can. You'll note that I call this behavior out in the event guidelines for every event I coordinate. When running the registration table late at night, you mention it. If someone starts doing it, an alert quartermaster, camp color man, or provost should put the stops on it.

      > There will always be someone with a ZZ Top beard in the ranks

      Doesn't have to be. Units can set standards that prohibit facial hair. Events can set authenticity guidelines as to what is and what isn't acceptable, based on their tolerance level. I've run events that prohibited facial hair and a unit told me that they couldn't come because one of their members portrays Santa Claus during the holidays and can't shave his beard. While I appreciated what Santa does for the kids, the event had a very targeted interpretation and was not meant to be huge (it was a living history at a small urban site, so we only wanted 20-50 participants) and beards didn't play into that.

      Cheers,
      Todd
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