Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Revlist] Re: Best Moments in the Hobby

Expand Messages
  • Carol Kocian
    One of my favorites was when we did the march in to Jockey Hollow. I think it was in December. It was several miles and the temperature that morning was 5
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      One of my favorites was when we did the march in to Jockey
      Hollow. I think it was in December. It was several miles and the
      temperature that morning was 5 degrees. Deb Peterson drove the SAG
      wagon, Andrew Batten did the march in his stocking feet and Keith
      Schenk had old, torn breeches and his leg was bright red from the
      cold. We walked on blacktop, and we may not have stuck to 18thC
      conversation, but we kept going, and going, and going.

      -Carol
    • qsysopr@charter.net
      That s an easy one. All the wonderful people that I ve met and the experiences that go along with it. Each event has something memorable. But when you boil
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        That's an easy one. All the wonderful people that I've met and the experiences that go along with it. Each event has something memorable. But when you boil it down, it's all about those that I've come in contact with and the impression they've left on me. With precious few exceptions, the members of this hobby (Rebel and Crown) are generally far more decent and honorable people than I encounter in the general populace. I am all the richer for knowing them.

        Patrick C.
        Sgt. du Chasseurs de Regt. Bourbonnais

        ---- barontigranes <tigranes@...> wrote:

        =============
        Howdy to the List,

        After reading the threads of the past few weeks, I would like to propose a new thread, to try to lighten the tone of the list.

        Many good folks have expressed what they do *not* like about their experiences in the hobby. I would like to read about best moments in the hobby. Whether at a reenactment, interacting with the public, hunting in period gear, etc. I would recommend restraint with negative statements, vis: "my best moment was when there were no beards or WIR, and everyone was in correct, fitting uniforms." With the upcoming holiday, consider this to be sort of a "what I am thankful for" thesis.

        To get the ball rolling, here are a couple of my moments....

        1. A crisp, foggy morning in October, I was in period gear, with my longrifle in hand. The sun was just rising, and the fields and woods were quiet. From my vantage point, the view was only unbroken forest covered with past-peak fall foliage, and all I could hear was the breeze and birds. After first passing up a shot at a deer silhouetted on an eastern ridge, a group passed by within 75 yards. One shot put down a doe, which I then field dressed with a knife that I had forged myself.

        2. Many moments when demonstrating blacksmithing, vistors become engaged, asking questions that show they have more than a passing interest in the background of the trade, and the historical context. Then there are the visitors that arrive without much of an interest who stay with rapt attention, and they leave, it's with a fresh spark of excitement over what they have seen.

        These are by no means my only "best of" moments, but they rank among the top.

        I look forward to reading moments from others.

        YHS,

        Tim Button
      • barontigranes
        Brandt, I think you and I have slightly different definitions of the hobby. I do not reenact military, thus my definition goes beyond battlefield scenarios
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 1, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Brandt,

          I think you and I have slightly different definitions of the hobby. I do not reenact military, thus my definition goes beyond battlefield scenarios and camp activities. For me, reenacting the AWI time period has little to do with the war. After all, the vast majority of those living in the colonies during the war were not involved with the fighting; even the majority of fighting-age men. Not that they were not affected by the war, but for them, life went on.

          So I guess the question is: If a man reenacts in the forest and there is no one to see, does he actually reenact? :)

          Yours,

          Tim Button

          --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, BrandtH605@... wrote:
          >
          Second, I was not aware that hunting animals is considered part of the hobby. I myself own a number of guns and for some reason have no problem recreating killing people, but I don't hunt animals.
          > Brandt Heatherington
          > Ensign
          > 1 Virga. Regt.
          >
          >
        • Ray Cresswell
          It was the summer of 1975. I was Ensign, and my wife was in ranks, with the Huntington Militia on Long Island. As a unit, we were new to reenacting but were
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 1, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            It was the summer of 1975. I was Ensign, and my wife was in ranks, with the Huntington Militia on Long Island. As a unit, we were new to reenacting but were well on our way to being reasonably accurate with our impressions. We had been invited by the 42 Highlanders/Black Watch to join them in NYC for a parade honoring the city's kickoff of the bicentennial. It was a bit comical because the 42 was essentially 1 company of pipers and drummers with a few muskets, whereas we - the invited "country bumpkins" putnumbered them with 2 musket companies and band.

            We arrived early in the morning at Battery Park and waited for the 42nd. A morning fog blocked our view of our surroundings - we could see only about a half block in each direction. Noting that it was warm, sunny, and relatively quiet, we went about our preparations, practiced drills, etc as we waited. After a few minutes we heard it: the sound of bagpipes wailing somewhere within the fog. The music (I think it was "Scotland the Brave") grew gradually louder as they approached, and suddenly - there they were - looming out of the fog with the sunlight gleaming off their spontoon tips and flagstaffs. We were, to say the least, impressed. I suggested to our commander that we render a proper Present Arms which he immediately ordered. It was a frozen moment in time as the 42nd marched into the Plaza, halted and presented in return.
            Just awesome.
            The rest of the day was spent parading, mock battle at lunch time at the Lincoln Center, making like a background for the Rockettes, etc. It was all pretty hokey I suppose, but got got paid for the event and had tiring but glorious time. Yet the one thing I'll never forget was the sound and then the sight of the 42nd approaching us that morning in that summer fog.
            And by the way, except for lunch and potty emergencies, I don't think those pipers took any breaks. Whether were "on" or not, it didn't matter. The day was one continuous pipe jam session! Whew.
            Ray 3NH

            rayc14@... ---------------------

            This space left intentionally blank.

            ---------- Original Message ----------

            --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "barontigranes" <tigranes@...> wrote:
            >
            > Howdy to the List,
            >
            > After reading the threads of the past few weeks, I would like to propose a new thread, to try to lighten the tone of the list.
            >
            > Many good folks have expressed what they do *not* like about their experiences in the hobby. I would like to read about best moments in the hobby. Whether at a reenactment, interacting with the public, hunting in period gear, etc. I would recommend restraint with negative statements, vis: "my best moment was when there were no beards or WIR, and everyone was in correct, fitting uniforms." With the upcoming holiday, consider this to be sort of a "what I am thankful for" thesis.
            >
            > To get the ball rolling, here are a couple of my moments....
            >
            > 1. A crisp, foggy morning in October, I was in period gear, with my longrifle in hand. The sun was just rising, and the fields and woods were quiet. From my vantage point, the view was only unbroken forest covered with past-peak fall foliage, and all I could hear was the breeze and birds. After first passing up a shot at a deer silhouetted on an eastern ridge, a group passed by within 75 yards. One shot put down a doe, which I then field dressed with a knife that I had forged myself.
            >
            > 2. Many moments when demonstrating blacksmithing, vistors become engaged, asking questions that show they have more than a passing interest in the background of the trade, and the historical context. Then there are the visitors that arrive without much of an interest who stay with rapt attention, and they leave, it's with a fresh spark of excitement over what they have seen.
            >
            > These are by no means my only "best of" moments, but they rank among the top.
            >
            > I look forward to reading moments from others.
            >
            > YHS,
            >
            > Tim Button
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Pastor Rob
            Top Rev War moments from a long time in the hobby: 200th Yorktown, 225th Saratoga, 225th Battle Road (I had always portrayed a Loyalist prior to this event.
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 2, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Top Rev War moments from a long time in the hobby: 200th Yorktown, 225th Saratoga, 225th Battle Road (I had always portrayed a Loyalist prior to this event. When the British column came down the road and we were ordered to fire, I blazed away and looking down at the smoking musket in my hands said, aloud, "My God, I've fired on my flag.")
              Possibly the best moment: A trek my unit did a couple years ago in the Alleghenies. We didn't see anyone out of period all day. We were supposed to be scouting for signs of Indian movement on the trails in the spring. About mid-day, we found a marking pile of rocks and a feather in the middle of the trail. None of us had placed it there. Honestly, we started looking for an ambush!
              -Rob Weaver
              Lochry's Militia Volunteers
            • jaffray2000
              The best moments for me, oddly enough, have always been on the march. Carol referenced the march to Jockey Hollow above, but there have been others. The
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 2, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                The best moments for me, oddly enough, have always been on the march. Carol referenced the march to Jockey Hollow above, but there have been others. The march to Trenton for the 225th anniversary was wonderful, trudging along the Delaware in the icy pre-dawn hours.

                The best moment, however, came at the 225th Battle Road. I was at the tail end of the British column, and we were the last ones into Concord. I glanced to my right and there, atop the hill in the churchyard, were two British officers. It was an exact depiction of the famous engraving of the battle, and I was transfixed. What an absolutely perfect moment in an almost perfect day.

                My thanks to the two geniuses who thought to provide that moment. I don't know how many other participants noticed, but I did, and it made my day.
              • BrandtH605@aol.com
                Interesting! I think the solitude would be kind of nice in a way actually. Carry on, sir! Brandt ... From: barontigranes To:
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 2, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Interesting! I think the solitude would be kind of nice in a way actually. Carry on, sir!
                  Brandt





                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: barontigranes <tigranes@...>
                  To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Mon, Nov 1, 2010 11:29 pm
                  Subject: [Revlist] Re: Best Moments in the Hobby






                  Brandt,

                  I think you and I have slightly different definitions of the hobby. I do not reenact military, thus my definition goes beyond battlefield scenarios and camp activities. For me, reenacting the AWI time period has little to do with the war. After all, the vast majority of those living in the colonies during the war were not involved with the fighting; even the majority of fighting-age men. Not that they were not affected by the war, but for them, life went on.

                  So I guess the question is: If a man reenacts in the forest and there is no one to see, does he actually reenact? :)

                  Yours,

                  Tim Button

                  --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, BrandtH605@... wrote:
                  >
                  Second, I was not aware that hunting animals is considered part of the hobby. I myself own a number of guns and for some reason have no problem recreating killing people, but I don't hunt animals.
                  > Brandt Heatherington
                  > Ensign
                  > 1 Virga. Regt.
                  >
                  >









                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Ed Kennedy
                  At Yorktown in 1981, the continentals were drawn up in a long line as the Brits marched by to surrender their arms. I looked to my right to see one of our
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 2, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    At Yorktown in 1981, the continentals were drawn up in a long line as the Brits marched by to surrender their arms. I looked to my right to see one of our fifers, a 13 year old girl, playing Chester with tears streaming down her face.

                    Ed Kennedy
                    1st Co'y, Herrick's Regt.







                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.