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WIR - the many Anne Baileys

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  • J. L. Bell on Revolutionary Boston
    Here s a question about women fighting in Continental forces that s nibbled at me for a while. Why are two examples named Ann Bailey? There s the Anne Hennis
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 29, 2010
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      Here's a question about women fighting in Continental forces that's
      nibbled at me for a while. Why are two examples named Ann Bailey?

      There's the Anne Hennis of Liverpool, who became Anne Trotter, and is
      said to have worked as a scout and courier for the forces in western
      Virginia. With a second marriage she became Anne Bailey, and that (with
      the appellation "Mad") is the name that's come down to us:
      <<http://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/ann-trotter-bailey/>>

      And there's the Nancy or Anne Bailey who enlisted in Massachusetts and
      served for several weeks in 1777, as Jennifer R-M just wrote about.

      Finally, not in the ranks or with the army but remembered for her manly
      exertions after the British storming of Fort Griswold was Anna Warner,
      who also married a Bailey:
      <<http://www.americanrevolution.org/women/women37.html>>

      Is this just coincidence? Do lines of folklore intersect?

      J. L. Bell Boston1775@...

      Unabashed gossip about the start of the American Revolution at
      <http://www.boston1775.net>.
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