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Re: [Revlist] Book of the Continental Soldier (was Re: Haversacks)

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  • W. Scott Smith
    Todd, Where would one purchase or access Jim Kochan s published work on French contract coats? Scott ... -- W. Scott Smith, Principal The Antiquaries, LC
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
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      Todd,

      Where would one purchase or access Jim Kochan's published work on French
      contract coats?

      Scott

      On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 1:36 PM, Todd Post <todd.post2@...> wrote:

      > Don,
      >
      > Good book, but the information is extremely dated and new documentation has
      > come to light since it was published. For instance, a more robust
      > understanding regarding the French-made regimental coats (AKA "Lottery
      > Coats) has been published by Jim Kochan that debunks what is printed in
      > Peterson's book as he only scraped the surface of their procurement and
      > distribution, whereas Kochan delved.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Todd
      >
      >
      > Mar 1, 2010 06:14:41 PM, Revlist@yahoogroups.com wrote:
      >
      > Was in the research section of the library and ran across this book: The
      > Book of the Continental Soldier by Harold L. Peterson and published in
      > 1968.
      > Didn�t have much time to look at it, but what I saw it seemed to have some
      > good research backed by a good Bibliography. Anyone else ever read this
      > book and if so, does it seem to be good info? Don
      >
      >
      >
      > From: John
      > Reply-To:
      >
      > Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:43:47 -0000
      > To:
      >
      > Subject: [Revlist] Re: Haversacks: Did they have them? Now Rev War food
      > article ...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Mike,
      >
      > Curious, I saw your post right AFTER I posted my piece on haversack
      > shortages. Sad to say, we think alike ...
      >
      > For anyone interested in more on Rev War soldiers' food, mess groups, food
      > distribution, my article (see outline below) on the subject will be out in
      > Military Collector & Historian later this year ... not too late to
      > subscribe
      > (for information see http://military-historians.org/ ) My piece on the
      > Battle of Millstone, January 1777, should be out in the March issue.
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > John
      > www.revwar75.com/library/rees
      >
      > "'To the hungry soul every bitter thing is sweet.': Soldiers' Food and
      > Cooking in the War for Independence"
      > Subheadings:
      >
      > "The manner of messing and living together": Continental Army Mess Groups
      > "Who shall have this?": Food Distribution
      > "A hard game ...": Continental Army Cooks
      > "On with Kittle, to make some hasty Pudding �": How a "Continental Devil"
      > Broke His Fast
      > 1. The Army Ration and Cooking Methods.
      > 2. Eating Utensils.
      > 3. The Morning Meal.
      > 4. Other Likely Breakfast Fare.
      >
      > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com , "mike"
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com , "John"
      > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Well, as frustrating as this conversation has been, some good
      > information
      > HAS come out. BUT, while British equipment returns show enough haversacks
      > issued
      > to complete all their soldiers (on campaign), American returns and other
      > accounts indicate periodic shortages, so much so that it was often the norm
      > for
      > Continental troops NOT to have haversacks. Next time you go out, try
      > carrying
      > your food in your knapsack or in a camp kettle (I have, it's an interesting
      > exercise).
      > > >
      > >
      > > John,
      > >
      > > Thanks for posting that piece. Quite interesting. Some of those returns
      > and
      > comments are ones I have seen and prompted my impression. Following is a
      > quote
      > from Burgoyne's "State of the Expedition from Canada ..." (available from
      > Don
      > Hagist, by the way) talking about men carrying their provisions:
      > >
      > > "Those who are acquainted with the capricious working of the tempers
      > of
      > men, will not wonder at the difficulty of prevailing upon a common soldier
      > in
      > any exigency to husband his provisions. In a settled camp, the young
      > soldier has
      > very short fare on the fourth day after delivery: but upon a march in bad
      > weather and bad roads, when the weary foot slips back at every step, and a
      > general curse is provoked at the weight that causes the retardment, he must
      > be a
      > patient veteran, and of much experience in scarcity, who is not tempted to
      > throw
      > the whole contents of the haversack into the mire. He feels the present
      > incumbrance grievous--Want is a day remote.--'Let the General find a
      > supply: it
      > is the King's cause and the General's interest--he will never let the
      > soldier be
      > starved.'
      > > "This is common reasoning in the ranks. I state it for those who have
      > not
      > seen fatiguing service, and may have a judgment to form upon it."
      > >
      > > Each day's provisions, if a reasonable quantity, would amount to two to
      > three
      > pounds and a soldier often received four days at a time so, do the
      > math--upwards
      > of twelve pounds hanging off that narrow strap. If you get tired carrying a
      > firelock that weighs less than that ...?
      > >
      > > Mike Barbieri
      > > Whitcomb's Corps
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
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      >
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      >


      --
      W. Scott Smith, Principal
      The Antiquaries, LC
      Historic Preservation Consulting

      Office: The Piedmont Center, 311 Rivermont Avenue
      Mailing: P.O. Box 75, Lynchburg, VA 24505
      Mobile 434-401-3995
      www.theantiquaries.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • virginiaregiment
      Scott, If memory serves, those who buy Lotto coat kits from the Cookie monster get the documentation packet thrown in. Jim www.virginiaregiment.org
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
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        Scott,
        If memory serves, those who buy Lotto coat kits from the Cookie monster get the documentation packet thrown in.
        Jim
        www.virginiaregiment.org
        www.secondvirginia.org

        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "W. Scott Smith" <scott@...> wrote:
        >
        > Todd,
        >
        > Where would one purchase or access Jim Kochan's published work on French
        > contract coats?
        >
        > Scott
        >
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