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Re: [Revlist] Book of the Continental Soldier (was Re: Haversacks)

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  • Gregory Theberge
    I think the more one reads, the better. Great book. Definitely take it out. That being said, I agree with Todd in saying that it s a bit dated. Neuman s
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
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      I think the more one reads, the better. Great book. Definitely take it out. That being said, I agree with Todd in saying that it's a bit dated. Neuman's Collector's Encyclopedia is also a great book if you're just starting out as well, but, again, some of the material is a bit dated, or should I say generalized (particularly regarding cooking equipment).
       
      I think the best stuff out there is the material John Reese put out and can be accessed on the revwar75 site. If you can get yourself some of the older BAR Dispatch articles, there's a lot of great information in there. Don Hagist did a great job over the years putting together a real quality publication. I believe you can get this through the BAR (www.brigade.org). I had a lot of fun doing an article for him ten years ago on British kitchens and provisions.
       
      I for one am looking forward to John's upcoming article in the Military Historian. He always comes up with great stuff.

      --- On Mon, 3/1/10, Todd Post <todd.post2@...> wrote:


      From: Todd Post <todd.post2@...>
      Subject: [Revlist] Book of the Continental Soldier (was Re: Haversacks)
      To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 1:36 PM


       



      Don,

      Good book, but the information is extremely dated and new documentation has come to light since it was published. For instance, a more robust understanding regarding the French-made regimental coats (AKA "Lottery Coats) has been published by Jim Kochan that debunks what is printed in Peterson's book as he only scraped the surface of their procurement and distribution, whereas Kochan delved.

      Cheers,
      Todd

      Mar 1, 2010 06:14:41 PM, Revlist@yahoogroups .com wrote:

      Was in the research section of the library and ran across this book: The
      Book of the Continental Soldier by Harold L. Peterson and published in 1968.
      Didn¹t have much time to look at it, but what I saw it seemed to have some
      good research backed by a good Bibliography. Anyone else ever read this
      book and if so, does it seem to be good info? Don

      From: John
      Reply-To:

      Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:43:47 -0000
      To:

      Subject: [Revlist] Re: Haversacks: Did they have them? Now Rev War food
      article ...

      Hi Mike,

      Curious, I saw your post right AFTER I posted my piece on haversack
      shortages. Sad to say, we think alike ...

      For anyone interested in more on Rev War soldiers' food, mess groups, food
      distribution, my article (see outline below) on the subject will be out in
      Military Collector & Historian later this year ... not too late to subscribe
      (for information see http://military- historians. org/ ) My piece on the
      Battle of Millstone, January 1777, should be out in the March issue.

      Cheers,

      John
      www.revwar75. com/library/ rees

      "'To the hungry soul every bitter thing is sweet.': Soldiers' Food and
      Cooking in the War for Independence"
      Subheadings:

      "The manner of messing and living together": Continental Army Mess Groups
      "Who shall have this?": Food Distribution
      "A hard game ...": Continental Army Cooks
      "On with Kittle, to make some hasty Pudding …": How a "Continental Devil"
      Broke His Fast
      1. The Army Ration and Cooking Methods.
      2. Eating Utensils.
      3. The Morning Meal.
      4. Other Likely Breakfast Fare.

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups .com , "mike"
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups .com , "John"
      wrote:
      > >
      > > Well, as frustrating as this conversation has been, some good information
      HAS come out. BUT, while British equipment returns show enough haversacks issued
      to complete all their soldiers (on campaign), American returns and other
      accounts indicate periodic shortages, so much so that it was often the norm for
      Continental troops NOT to have haversacks. Next time you go out, try carrying
      your food in your knapsack or in a camp kettle (I have, it's an interesting
      exercise).
      > >
      >
      > John,
      >
      > Thanks for posting that piece. Quite interesting. Some of those returns and
      comments are ones I have seen and prompted my impression. Following is a quote
      from Burgoyne's "State of the Expedition from Canada ..." (available from Don
      Hagist, by the way) talking about men carrying their provisions:
      >
      > "Those who are acquainted with the capricious working of the tempers of
      men, will not wonder at the difficulty of prevailing upon a common soldier in
      any exigency to husband his provisions. In a settled camp, the young soldier has
      very short fare on the fourth day after delivery: but upon a march in bad
      weather and bad roads, when the weary foot slips back at every step, and a
      general curse is provoked at the weight that causes the retardment, he must be a
      patient veteran, and of much experience in scarcity, who is not tempted to throw
      the whole contents of the haversack into the mire. He feels the present
      incumbrance grievous--Want is a day remote.--'Let the General find a supply: it
      is the King's cause and the General's interest--he will never let the soldier be
      starved.'
      > "This is common reasoning in the ranks. I state it for those who have not
      seen fatiguing service, and may have a judgment to form upon it."
      >
      > Each day's provisions, if a reasonable quantity, would amount to two to three
      pounds and a soldier often received four days at a time so, do the math--upwards
      of twelve pounds hanging off that narrow strap. If you get tired carrying a
      firelock that weighs less than that ...?
      >
      > Mike Barbieri
      > Whitcomb's Corps
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      ------------ --------- --------- ------

      Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList member photos, FAQ, etc., at

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • W. Scott Smith
      Todd, Where would one purchase or access Jim Kochan s published work on French contract coats? Scott ... -- W. Scott Smith, Principal The Antiquaries, LC
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Todd,

        Where would one purchase or access Jim Kochan's published work on French
        contract coats?

        Scott

        On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 1:36 PM, Todd Post <todd.post2@...> wrote:

        > Don,
        >
        > Good book, but the information is extremely dated and new documentation has
        > come to light since it was published. For instance, a more robust
        > understanding regarding the French-made regimental coats (AKA "Lottery
        > Coats) has been published by Jim Kochan that debunks what is printed in
        > Peterson's book as he only scraped the surface of their procurement and
        > distribution, whereas Kochan delved.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Todd
        >
        >
        > Mar 1, 2010 06:14:41 PM, Revlist@yahoogroups.com wrote:
        >
        > Was in the research section of the library and ran across this book: The
        > Book of the Continental Soldier by Harold L. Peterson and published in
        > 1968.
        > Didn�t have much time to look at it, but what I saw it seemed to have some
        > good research backed by a good Bibliography. Anyone else ever read this
        > book and if so, does it seem to be good info? Don
        >
        >
        >
        > From: John
        > Reply-To:
        >
        > Date: Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:43:47 -0000
        > To:
        >
        > Subject: [Revlist] Re: Haversacks: Did they have them? Now Rev War food
        > article ...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Mike,
        >
        > Curious, I saw your post right AFTER I posted my piece on haversack
        > shortages. Sad to say, we think alike ...
        >
        > For anyone interested in more on Rev War soldiers' food, mess groups, food
        > distribution, my article (see outline below) on the subject will be out in
        > Military Collector & Historian later this year ... not too late to
        > subscribe
        > (for information see http://military-historians.org/ ) My piece on the
        > Battle of Millstone, January 1777, should be out in the March issue.
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > John
        > www.revwar75.com/library/rees
        >
        > "'To the hungry soul every bitter thing is sweet.': Soldiers' Food and
        > Cooking in the War for Independence"
        > Subheadings:
        >
        > "The manner of messing and living together": Continental Army Mess Groups
        > "Who shall have this?": Food Distribution
        > "A hard game ...": Continental Army Cooks
        > "On with Kittle, to make some hasty Pudding �": How a "Continental Devil"
        > Broke His Fast
        > 1. The Army Ration and Cooking Methods.
        > 2. Eating Utensils.
        > 3. The Morning Meal.
        > 4. Other Likely Breakfast Fare.
        >
        > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com , "mike"
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com , "John"
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Well, as frustrating as this conversation has been, some good
        > information
        > HAS come out. BUT, while British equipment returns show enough haversacks
        > issued
        > to complete all their soldiers (on campaign), American returns and other
        > accounts indicate periodic shortages, so much so that it was often the norm
        > for
        > Continental troops NOT to have haversacks. Next time you go out, try
        > carrying
        > your food in your knapsack or in a camp kettle (I have, it's an interesting
        > exercise).
        > > >
        > >
        > > John,
        > >
        > > Thanks for posting that piece. Quite interesting. Some of those returns
        > and
        > comments are ones I have seen and prompted my impression. Following is a
        > quote
        > from Burgoyne's "State of the Expedition from Canada ..." (available from
        > Don
        > Hagist, by the way) talking about men carrying their provisions:
        > >
        > > "Those who are acquainted with the capricious working of the tempers
        > of
        > men, will not wonder at the difficulty of prevailing upon a common soldier
        > in
        > any exigency to husband his provisions. In a settled camp, the young
        > soldier has
        > very short fare on the fourth day after delivery: but upon a march in bad
        > weather and bad roads, when the weary foot slips back at every step, and a
        > general curse is provoked at the weight that causes the retardment, he must
        > be a
        > patient veteran, and of much experience in scarcity, who is not tempted to
        > throw
        > the whole contents of the haversack into the mire. He feels the present
        > incumbrance grievous--Want is a day remote.--'Let the General find a
        > supply: it
        > is the King's cause and the General's interest--he will never let the
        > soldier be
        > starved.'
        > > "This is common reasoning in the ranks. I state it for those who have
        > not
        > seen fatiguing service, and may have a judgment to form upon it."
        > >
        > > Each day's provisions, if a reasonable quantity, would amount to two to
        > three
        > pounds and a soldier often received four days at a time so, do the
        > math--upwards
        > of twelve pounds hanging off that narrow strap. If you get tired carrying a
        > firelock that weighs less than that ...?
        > >
        > > Mike Barbieri
        > > Whitcomb's Corps
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList
        > member photos, FAQ, etc., at
        >
        > http://www.liming.org/revlist/ or add your own links at
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/
        >
        > To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/ and click "Join This List."
        >
        > TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to
        > Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Visit the RevList Homepage, which includes a list of sutlers, RevList
        > member photos, FAQ, etc., at
        >
        > http://www.liming.org/revlist/ or add your own links at
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/
        >
        > To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Revlist/ and click "Join This List."
        >
        > TO UNSUBSCRIBE: please send a message to
        > Revlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > with "unsubscribe" in the subject line.Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        --
        W. Scott Smith, Principal
        The Antiquaries, LC
        Historic Preservation Consulting

        Office: The Piedmont Center, 311 Rivermont Avenue
        Mailing: P.O. Box 75, Lynchburg, VA 24505
        Mobile 434-401-3995
        www.theantiquaries.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • virginiaregiment
        Scott, If memory serves, those who buy Lotto coat kits from the Cookie monster get the documentation packet thrown in. Jim www.virginiaregiment.org
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
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          Scott,
          If memory serves, those who buy Lotto coat kits from the Cookie monster get the documentation packet thrown in.
          Jim
          www.virginiaregiment.org
          www.secondvirginia.org

          --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "W. Scott Smith" <scott@...> wrote:
          >
          > Todd,
          >
          > Where would one purchase or access Jim Kochan's published work on French
          > contract coats?
          >
          > Scott
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.