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Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )

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  • Eric Kelly
    There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called Navy Rhum    all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........but none of
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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      There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
       
      Cheers!
      Eric Kelly

      --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@...> wrote:


      From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@...>
      Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
      To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM


       



      List,
      After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
      Cheers,
      Bob Bolton
      Pa. Associators











      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • OtterFox Fire
      Speaking of alcohol, and other products from NE. Is there any information on apple orchards in New Hampshire in the mid 18th century. Apple cider, hard cider,
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Speaking of alcohol, and other products from NE.
        Is there any information on apple orchards in New Hampshire in the mid 18th century. Apple cider, hard cider, export etc.

        Sincerely,
         Jerry K. 

        --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bcortez98_2 <bcortez98_2@...> wrote:

        From: bcortez98_2 <bcortez98_2@...>
        Subject: [Revlist] Re: Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 8:50 PM







         









        Bob,



        Any Barbados amber or dark rum is likely a match. Prior to the Revolution, the molasses created during the production of sugar (from sugar cane) in the Caribbean was shipped to New England for the use in fermenting and distilling rum. It's also likely (but I'd have to dig up some primary docs to quantify this theory), that the Continental Line would have been supplied, at least in part, by this locally produced rum.



        Here's a short rum history primer for you:



        ------------ --------- --------- --

        Rum: Its History and Significance

        ©2001-2010 Beverage Testing Institute



        (For the complete text, visit - http://www.tastings .com/spirits/ rum.html)



        The history of Rum is the history of sugar. Sugar is a sweet crystalline carbohydrate that occurs naturally in a variety of plants. One of those is the sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) , a tall, thick grass that has its origins in the islands of present-day Indonesia in the East Indies. Chinese traders spread its cultivation to Asia and on to India. Arabs in turn brought it to the Middle East and North Africa where it came to the attention of Europeans during the Crusades in the 11th century.



        As the Spanish and Portuguese began to venture out into the Atlantic Ocean, they planted sugar cane in the Canary and Azore Islands. In 1493 Christopher Columbus picked up cane cuttings from the Canaries while on his second voyage to the Americas and transplanted them to Hispaniola, the island in the Caribbean that is now shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Portuguese explorers soon did likewise in Brazil.



        The Caribbean basin proved to have an ideal climate for growing sugar cane, and sugar production quickly spread around the islands. The insatiable demand in Europe for sugar soon led to the establishment of hundreds of sugar cane plantations and mills in the various English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Dutch colonies. These mills crushed the harvested cane and extracted the juice. Boiling this juice caused chunks of crystallized sugar to form. The remaining unsolidified juice was called melazas (from "miel," the Spanish word for honey); in English this became molasses.



        Molasses is a sticky syrup that still contains a significant amount of sugar. Sugar mill operators soon noticed that when it was mixed with water and left out in the sun it would ferment. By the 1650s this former waste product was being distilled into a spirit. In the English colonies it was called Kill Devil (from its tendency to cause a nasty hangover or its perceived medicinal power, take your choice) or rumbullion (origins uncertain), which was shortened over the years to our modern word Rum. The French render this word as rhum, while the Spanish call it ron.



        Locally, Rum was used as cure-all for many of the aches and pains that afflicted those living in the tropics. Sugar plantation owners also sold it, at discounted prices, to naval ships that were on station in the Caribbean in order to encourage their presence in local waters and thus discourage the attentions of marauding pirates. The British navy adopted a daily ration of a half-pint of 160 proof Rum by the 1730s. This ration was subsequently modified by mixing it with an equal amount of water to produce a drink called grog. The grog ration remained a staple of British naval life until 1969.



        This naval-Rum connection introduced Rum to the outside world and by the late 17th century a thriving export trade developed. The British islands shipped Rum to Great Britain (where it was mixed into Rum punches and replaced gin as the dominant spirit in the 18th century) and to the British colonies in North America where it became very popular. This export of Rum to North America, in exchange for New England lumber and dried cod (still a culinary staple in the Caribbean) soon changed over to the export of molasses to distilleries in New England. This was done in order to avoid laws from the British parliament, which protected British distillers by forbidding the trade in spirits directly between colonies. This law was, at best, honored in the breech, and smuggling soon became rampant.



        The shipping of molasses to make Rum in New England distilleries became part of the infamous "slavery triangle." The first leg was the shipment of molasses to New England to make Rum. The second leg was the shipment of Rum to the ports of West Africa to trade for slaves. The final leg was the passage of slave ships to the sugar plantations of the Caribbean and South America where many of the slaves were put to work in the sugar cane fields.

























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lowell Thomas
        HEY ERIC------ EVER HAD HOMEMADE DARK RUM MADE FROM JACK STRAP MOLASSES ? NOW THERE S AN EXPERIENCE !!!!!!!!! Lowell aka Oldeturtle
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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          HEY ERIC------ EVER HAD HOMEMADE DARK RUM MADE FROM JACK STRAP MOLASSES ?
          NOW THERE'S AN EXPERIENCE !!!!!!!!!
          Lowell aka Oldeturtle


          ________________________________
          From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
          To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 11:18:02 AM
          Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )


          There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum" all i can tell you is, I have MANY different rums in my time........ but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!" As soon as i tasted it, it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like. I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes, but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!

          Cheers!
          Eric Kelly

          --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@yahoo. com> wrote:

          From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@yahoo. com>
          Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
          To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
          Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM



          List,
          After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
          Cheers,
          Bob Bolton
          Pa. Associators

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Todd Post
          Jerry, Check out: http://www.westonapples.com/apples.htm http://www.treesofantiquity.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=41_1 For a list of apple varieties
          Message 4 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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            Jerry,

            Check out:

            http://www.westonapples.com/apples.htm
            http://www.treesofantiquity.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=41_1

            For a list of apple varieties with some background as to their provenance and date of development. There's also the Old Time Cider blog: http://oldtimecider.com/

            Cheers,
            Todd Post
            2d Virginia Regiment
            www.secondvirginia.org


            Feb 28, 2010 06:02:15 PM, Revlist@yahoogroups.com wrote:

            ===========================================

            Speaking of alcohol, and other products from NE.
            Is there any information on apple orchards in New Hampshire in the mid 18th century. Apple cider, hard cider, export etc.

            Sincerely,
             Jerry K.
          • Dan H
            A very informed liquor store owner, who I know and trust, told me pussers was served to the British Navy from 1730 s till 1970 ( don t quote me on the dates
            Message 5 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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              A very informed liquor store owner, who I know and trust, told me pussers was served to the British Navy from 1730's till 1970 ( don't quote me on the dates but I am close) and there was a crown order to maintain the same formula.  He special ordered it for me and it was NASTY stuff if you ask me, which makes me believe he wasn't lying.
               Dan H 




              ________________________________
              From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
              To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 11:18:02 AM
              Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )

               
              There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........ but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
               
              Cheers!
              Eric Kelly

              --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@yahoo. com> wrote:

              From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@yahoo. com>
              Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
              To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
              Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM

               

              List,
              After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
              Cheers,
              Bob Bolton
              Pa. Associators

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • kiltiemon@aol.com
              Most Esteemed List: Many years ago I fell upon and became enamoured of (along with most that shared it in following years) a bottle from Appleton Estates. It
              Message 6 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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                Most Esteemed List:

                Many years ago I fell upon and became enamoured of (along with most
                that shared it in following years) a bottle from Appleton Estates. It
                was an extremely dark rum, heavy, with a feverishly delicious taste of
                molassass. It was so heady that it actually formed a "Crust" on ice
                cubes when poured over them. I haven't been able to find a bottle of
                that black rum for years now, though I've tried in all sorts of liquor
                stores from high class to dives in the "Glades" where the Island and
                South American migrant workers frequent (I'd expect the demand for a
                good heavy rum to be just the thing to survive there, but still, found
                nothing at all).

                IIRC it was rather inexpensive, as well. Anyone know of this
                (seemingly) dis-continued black rum? Appleton is a historic
                (mid-1700's) affair and still uses the same cane fields as well as
                (until recently, anyway) using a "noser" to manage its' blends. I
                always like to think that my rum was made from direct descendents of
                1760's cane plants in a descendent of an original 1760's distillery.
                Made it extra-special!

                Jim aka kiltiemon (Desperately seeking a source of the above!)

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
                To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sun, Feb 28, 2010 11:18 am
                Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )




                There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy
                Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my
                time........but none of them actually made me stop and say
                "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as
                i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic
                Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for
                that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that
                would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                 
                Cheers!
                Eric Kelly

                --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@...> wrote:

                From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@...>
                Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM

                 

                List,
                After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for
                some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest
                camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
                Cheers,
                Bob Bolton
                Pa. Associators

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Robert Aldridge
                only people I ve heard say Pussers is bad are the same ones that think Budweiser is actually beer.... ... From: Dan H Subject: Re:
                Message 7 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  only people I've heard say Pussers is bad are the same ones that think Budweiser is actually beer....

                  --- On Sun, 2/28/10, Dan H <dansbess@...> wrote:


                  From: Dan H <dansbess@...>
                  Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                  To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, February 28, 2010, 8:22 PM


                   



                  A very informed liquor store owner, who I know and trust, told me pussers was served to the British Navy from 1730's till 1970 ( don't quote me on the dates but I am close) and there was a crown order to maintain the same formula.  He special ordered it for me and it was NASTY stuff if you ask me, which makes me believe he wasn't lying.
                   Dan H 

                  ____________ _________ _________ __
                  From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@ yahoo.com>
                  To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
                  Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 11:18:02 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )

                   
                  There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........ but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                   
                  Cheers!
                  Eric Kelly

                  --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@ yahoo. com> wrote:

                  From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@ yahoo. com>
                  Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                  To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
                  Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM

                   

                  List,
                  After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
                  Cheers,
                  Bob Bolton
                  Pa. Associators

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • john navarro
                  I highly recommend Gosling s Black Seal Black Rum made in Bermuda since 1806. It is full bodied, smooth with a rich nose. Made in a former British colony which
                  Message 8 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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                    I highly recommend Gosling's Black Seal Black Rum made in Bermuda since 1806. It is full bodied, smooth with a rich nose. Made in a former British colony which should make it very like what the Brits got back them. It is widely avalible in most medium to large liquor stores.

                    I've even made converts among my Bourbon drinking CW pards!

                    John Navarro

                    --- On Sun, 2/28/10, Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...> wrote:

                    > From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
                    > Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                    > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Sunday, February 28, 2010, 10:18 AM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >   
                    >
                    >
                    >     
                    >       
                    >       
                    >       There is a rum that my brother brings back from
                    > Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you
                    > is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........ but none
                    > of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this
                    > must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As
                    > soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an
                    > Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I
                    > don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,  
                    > but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that
                    > would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties
                    > navy!
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Cheers!
                    >
                    > Eric Kelly
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@yahoo.
                    > com> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@yahoo.
                    > com>
                    >
                    > Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good
                    > standings! ; )
                    >
                    > To: Revlist@yahoogroups
                    > .com
                    >
                    > Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > List,
                    >
                    > After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing
                    > this out for some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is
                    > producing the closest camparison to 18th century rum for
                    > both taste and color?
                    >
                    > Cheers,
                    >
                    > Bob Bolton
                    >
                    > Pa. Associators
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >     
                    >     
                    >
                    >     
                    >     
                    >
                    >

                    >
                    >
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                    >   
                    >
                    >
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                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                    >
                  • Dan H
                    Spruce beer is really good, pussers is a little harsh for me, thats all I m sayin. Capin Morgin is good, but not PC ________________________________ From:
                    Message 9 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Spruce beer is really good, pussers is a little harsh for me, thats all I'm sayin. Capin Morgin is good, but not PC




                      ________________________________
                      From: Robert Aldridge <raldridge_mt@...>
                      To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 3:55:09 PM
                      Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )

                       
                      only people I've heard say Pussers is bad are the same ones that think Budweiser is actually beer....

                      --- On Sun, 2/28/10, Dan H <dansbess@yahoo. com> wrote:

                      From: Dan H <dansbess@yahoo. com>
                      Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                      To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
                      Date: Sunday, February 28, 2010, 8:22 PM

                       

                      A very informed liquor store owner, who I know and trust, told me pussers was served to the British Navy from 1730's till 1970 ( don't quote me on the dates but I am close) and there was a crown order to maintain the same formula.  He special ordered it for me and it was NASTY stuff if you ask me, which makes me believe he wasn't lying.
                       Dan H 

                      ____________ _________ _________ __
                      From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany @ yahoo.com>
                      To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
                      Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 11:18:02 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )

                       
                      There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........ but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                       
                      Cheers!
                      Eric Kelly

                      --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@ yahoo. com> wrote:

                      From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@ yahoo. com>
                      Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                      To: Revlist@yahoogroups .com
                      Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM

                       

                      List,
                      After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
                      Cheers,
                      Bob Bolton
                      Pa. Associators

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jayar Milligan
                      well Kiltiemon, it seems you need to plan a little side trip to Nova Scotia, ...or at least atlantic Canada. Appletons is alive and well and living up here.
                      Message 10 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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                        well Kiltiemon,

                        it seems you need to plan a little side trip to Nova Scotia, ...or at least atlantic Canada. Appletons is alive and well and living up here. come to think of it, Atlantic Canada is a kind of center (mecca?) for black rum lovers.

                        Most of the brands recently mentioned live on the shelves of the regular liquor stores up here. the specialty shops would have an additional20-30 types. Appleton's is indeed well thought of. Which variation of their dark rums did you have?



                        Unless you're heading for Jamaica or Barbados yourself of course, why not plan to attend a BAR event in Nova Scotia this summer. Then you could supplement your visit with a little rum tasting and comparative research.



                        Jayar in NS




                        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                        From: kiltiemon@...
                        Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 15:24:35 -0500
                        Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )





                        Most Esteemed List:

                        Many years ago I fell upon and became enamoured of (along with most
                        that shared it in following years) a bottle from Appleton Estates. It
                        was an extremely dark rum, heavy, with a feverishly delicious taste of
                        molassass. It was so heady that it actually formed a "Crust" on ice
                        cubes when poured over them. I haven't been able to find a bottle of
                        that black rum for years now, though I've tried in all sorts of liquor
                        stores from high class to dives in the "Glades" where the Island and
                        South American migrant workers frequent (I'd expect the demand for a
                        good heavy rum to be just the thing to survive there, but still, found
                        nothing at all).

                        IIRC it was rather inexpensive, as well. Anyone know of this
                        (seemingly) dis-continued black rum? Appleton is a historic
                        (mid-1700's) affair and still uses the same cane fields as well as
                        (until recently, anyway) using a "noser" to manage its' blends. I
                        always like to think that my rum was made from direct descendents of
                        1760's cane plants in a descendent of an original 1760's distillery.
                        Made it extra-special!

                        Jim aka kiltiemon (Desperately seeking a source of the above!)

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
                        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sun, Feb 28, 2010 11:18 am
                        Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )

                        There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy
                        Rhum" all i can tell you is, I have MANY different rums in my
                        time........but none of them actually made me stop and say
                        "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!" As soon as
                        i tasted it, it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic
                        Rum would have tasted like. I don't know how far back the recipe for
                        that goes, but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that
                        would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!

                        Cheers!
                        Eric Kelly

                        --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@...> wrote:

                        From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@...>
                        Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM



                        List,
                        After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for
                        some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest
                        camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
                        Cheers,
                        Bob Bolton
                        Pa. Associators

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • mike
                        The Navy rum you refer to, Eric, is produced by Corby distillery under the Lamb label. I often imbibe the stuff when in Canada and generally keep a bottle up
                        Message 11 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          The "Navy" rum you refer to, Eric, is produced by Corby distillery under the Lamb label. I often imbibe the stuff when in Canada and generally keep a bottle up there. As far as I know, it's a blend of several Caribbean rums. I dunno if it's available in the States.

                          The name Pusser's is a bastardization of "purser," the person on ship who controlled the rum ration. The rum we have today, like Lamb's, is also a blend. Oddly enough, it is actually bottled in Indiana if I remember rightly.

                          I highly doubt they gave out "single malt" rums on ship in our time period. I imagine the purchasing agents just bought whatever they could get cheaply and in quantity, adulterated/diluted it, and threw it all into vats to be distributed to the fleet, there to be diluted again into "grog" before issuing.

                          Mike Barbieri
                          Whitcomb's Corps


                          --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                          >  
                          > Cheers!
                          > Eric Kelly
                        • Robert Aldridge
                          Pussers is made in barbados, bottled in B.V.I. they claim to be the same rum issued in 1970 not 1770... ... From: mike Subject:
                          Message 12 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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                            Pussers is made in barbados, bottled in B.V.I.
                            they claim to be the same rum issued in 1970 not 1770...

                            --- On Mon, 3/1/10, mike <ottercreek@...> wrote:


                            From: mike <ottercreek@...>
                            Subject: [Revlist] Re: Rum--Navy--Pusser's
                            To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Monday, March 1, 2010, 2:11 AM


                             



                            The "Navy" rum you refer to, Eric, is produced by Corby distillery under the Lamb label. I often imbibe the stuff when in Canada and generally keep a bottle up there. As far as I know, it's a blend of several Caribbean rums. I dunno if it's available in the States.

                            The name Pusser's is a bastardization of "purser," the person on ship who controlled the rum ration. The rum we have today, like Lamb's, is also a blend. Oddly enough, it is actually bottled in Indiana if I remember rightly.

                            I highly doubt they gave out "single malt" rums on ship in our time period. I imagine the purchasing agents just bought whatever they could get cheaply and in quantity, adulterated/ diluted it, and threw it all into vats to be distributed to the fleet, there to be diluted again into "grog" before issuing.

                            Mike Barbieri
                            Whitcomb's Corps

                            --- In Revlist@yahoogroups .com, Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany @...> wrote:
                            >
                            > There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy Rhum"   all i can tell you is,  I have MANY different rums in my time........ but none of them actually made me stop and say "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!"   As soon as i tasted it,  it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic Rum would have tasted like.    I don't know how far back the recipe for that goes,   but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                            >  
                            > Cheers!
                            > Eric Kelly











                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • mike
                            Jayar, I don t think Appleton makes a black rum any more--at least I haven t seen it on PEI or in New Brunswick. They do make some fine dark and gold rums that
                            Message 13 of 21 , Feb 28, 2010
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                              Jayar,

                              I don't think Appleton makes a black rum any more--at least I haven't seen it on PEI or in New Brunswick. They do make some fine dark and gold rums that are readily available, however. A bit pricey. You certainly are right about the popularity of dark rums in the Atlantic region. Several varieties can be found all over the place.

                              I'm keeping watch on the schedule of events in your region so I can attend one this summer. I've threatened to be the only Continental at an event in the Maritimes for years but have yet to make it--work, schedule, wife, etc. Anybody wanna set one up on the Island? Port la Joye/Fort Amherst, maybe?

                              Mike Barbieri
                              Whitcomb's Corps

                              --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Jayar Milligan <jayar_milligan@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > well Kiltiemon,
                              >
                              > it seems you need to plan a little side trip to Nova Scotia, ...or at least atlantic Canada. Appletons is alive and well and living up here. come to think of it, Atlantic Canada is a kind of center (mecca?) for black rum lovers.
                              >
                              > Most of the brands recently mentioned live on the shelves of the regular liquor stores up here. the specialty shops would have an additional20-30 types. Appleton's is indeed well thought of. Which variation of their dark rums did you have?
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Unless you're heading for Jamaica or Barbados yourself of course, why not plan to attend a BAR event in Nova Scotia this summer. Then you could supplement your visit with a little rum tasting and comparative research.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Jayar in NS
                              >
                            • Michael Parrish
                              I had a bottle of Black Strap . Was black and had a molasses wang to it. Seemed fitting. MIKE
                              Message 14 of 21 , Mar 1, 2010
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                                I had a bottle of "Black Strap". Was black and had a molasses wang to it. Seemed fitting. MIKE
                                --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "mike" <ottercreek@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Jayar,
                                >
                                > I don't think Appleton makes a black rum any more--at least I haven't seen it on PEI or in New Brunswick. They do make some fine dark and gold rums that are readily available, however. A bit pricey. You certainly are right about the popularity of dark rums in the Atlantic region. Several varieties can be found all over the place.
                                >
                                > I'm keeping watch on the schedule of events in your region so I can attend one this summer. I've threatened to be the only Continental at an event in the Maritimes for years but have yet to make it--work, schedule, wife, etc. Anybody wanna set one up on the Island? Port la Joye/Fort Amherst, maybe?
                                >
                                > Mike Barbieri
                                > Whitcomb's Corps
                                >
                                > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Jayar Milligan <jayar_milligan@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > well Kiltiemon,
                                > >
                                > > it seems you need to plan a little side trip to Nova Scotia, ...or at least atlantic Canada. Appletons is alive and well and living up here. come to think of it, Atlantic Canada is a kind of center (mecca?) for black rum lovers.
                                > >
                                > > Most of the brands recently mentioned live on the shelves of the regular liquor stores up here. the specialty shops would have an additional20-30 types. Appleton's is indeed well thought of. Which variation of their dark rums did you have?
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Unless you're heading for Jamaica or Barbados yourself of course, why not plan to attend a BAR event in Nova Scotia this summer. Then you could supplement your visit with a little rum tasting and comparative research.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Jayar in NS
                                > >
                                >
                              • marysvr
                                I don t know where you live, Jim (Kiltiemon), but I ve seen some Appleton s Estates rums at liquor stores in the Annapolis, MD area, although I m not sure if
                                Message 15 of 21 , Mar 1, 2010
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                                  I don't know where you live, Jim (Kiltiemon), but I've seen some Appleton's Estates rums at liquor stores in the Annapolis, MD area, although I'm not sure if these include the the exact dark variety you have in mind. I wouldn't call it inexpensive, unfortunately.

                                  --Mary S.

                                  --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Jayar Milligan <jayar_milligan@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > well Kiltiemon,
                                  >
                                  > it seems you need to plan a little side trip to Nova Scotia, ...or at least atlantic Canada. Appletons is alive and well and living up here. come to think of it, Atlantic Canada is a kind of center (mecca?) for black rum lovers.
                                  >
                                  > Most of the brands recently mentioned live on the shelves of the regular liquor stores up here. the specialty shops would have an additional20-30 types. Appleton's is indeed well thought of. Which variation of their dark rums did you have?
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Unless you're heading for Jamaica or Barbados yourself of course, why not plan to attend a BAR event in Nova Scotia this summer. Then you could supplement your visit with a little rum tasting and comparative research.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Jayar in NS
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                                  > From: kiltiemon@...
                                  > Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 15:24:35 -0500
                                  > Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Most Esteemed List:
                                  >
                                  > Many years ago I fell upon and became enamoured of (along with most
                                  > that shared it in following years) a bottle from Appleton Estates. It
                                  > was an extremely dark rum, heavy, with a feverishly delicious taste of
                                  > molassass. It was so heady that it actually formed a "Crust" on ice
                                  > cubes when poured over them. I haven't been able to find a bottle of
                                  > that black rum for years now, though I've tried in all sorts of liquor
                                  > stores from high class to dives in the "Glades" where the Island and
                                  > South American migrant workers frequent (I'd expect the demand for a
                                  > good heavy rum to be just the thing to survive there, but still, found
                                  > nothing at all).
                                  >
                                  > IIRC it was rather inexpensive, as well. Anyone know of this
                                  > (seemingly) dis-continued black rum? Appleton is a historic
                                  > (mid-1700's) affair and still uses the same cane fields as well as
                                  > (until recently, anyway) using a "noser" to manage its' blends. I
                                  > always like to think that my rum was made from direct descendents of
                                  > 1760's cane plants in a descendent of an original 1760's distillery.
                                  > Made it extra-special!
                                  >
                                  > Jim aka kiltiemon (Desperately seeking a source of the above!)
                                  >
                                  > -----Original Message-----
                                  > From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
                                  > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Sun, Feb 28, 2010 11:18 am
                                  > Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                                  >
                                  > There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy
                                  > Rhum" all i can tell you is, I have MANY different rums in my
                                  > time........but none of them actually made me stop and say
                                  > "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!" As soon as
                                  > i tasted it, it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic
                                  > Rum would have tasted like. I don't know how far back the recipe for
                                  > that goes, but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that
                                  > would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                                  >
                                  > Cheers!
                                  > Eric Kelly
                                  >
                                  > --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@...>
                                  > Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                                  > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > List,
                                  > After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for
                                  > some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest
                                  > camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
                                  > Cheers,
                                  > Bob Bolton
                                  > Pa. Associators
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                • Sarah O'Connor
                                  I spent some time working on a 136 brigantine down in the Caribbean a few years ago and was pleasantly surprised to find that every island had its own
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Mar 1, 2010
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    I spent some time working on a 136' brigantine down in the Caribbean a few
                                    years ago and was pleasantly surprised to find that every island had its own
                                    distinct rum flavors, ranging from clear as water to black and smoky. I only
                                    wish I'd thought to check out the maximum amount I could bring back into the
                                    States - I erred on the side of caution, sadly.

                                    There is a rum museum on Martinique. Unfortunately, I only found out about
                                    it while we were docked at the next island over, without enough time to get
                                    there and back before going on watch. (My fellow crewmates and I did
                                    consider the ship's dinghy with a speculative air...) I've never been there,
                                    but perhaps some inspired scholars could take one for the team and do a
                                    little scouting? ;)

                                    ~Sarah O'Connor
                                    Currently with the much smaller armed ketch "Merganser."
                                    www.heart-of-oak.com



                                    On Sun, Feb 28, 2010 at 8:57 PM, Jayar Milligan
                                    <jayar_milligan@...>wrote:

                                    >
                                    > well Kiltiemon,
                                    >
                                    > it seems you need to plan a little side trip to Nova Scotia, ...or at least
                                    > atlantic Canada. Appletons is alive and well and living up here. come to
                                    > think of it, Atlantic Canada is a kind of center (mecca?) for black rum
                                    > lovers.
                                    >
                                    > Most of the brands recently mentioned live on the shelves of the regular
                                    > liquor stores up here. the specialty shops would have an additional20-30
                                    > types. Appleton's is indeed well thought of. Which variation of their dark
                                    > rums did you have?
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Unless you're heading for Jamaica or Barbados yourself of course, why not
                                    > plan to attend a BAR event in Nova Scotia this summer. Then you could
                                    > supplement your visit with a little rum tasting and comparative research.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Jayar in NS
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                                    > From: kiltiemon@...
                                    > Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 15:24:35 -0500
                                    > Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Most Esteemed List:
                                    >
                                    > Many years ago I fell upon and became enamoured of (along with most
                                    > that shared it in following years) a bottle from Appleton Estates. It
                                    > was an extremely dark rum, heavy, with a feverishly delicious taste of
                                    > molassass. It was so heady that it actually formed a "Crust" on ice
                                    > cubes when poured over them. I haven't been able to find a bottle of
                                    > that black rum for years now, though I've tried in all sorts of liquor
                                    > stores from high class to dives in the "Glades" where the Island and
                                    > South American migrant workers frequent (I'd expect the demand for a
                                    > good heavy rum to be just the thing to survive there, but still, found
                                    > nothing at all).
                                    >
                                    > IIRC it was rather inexpensive, as well. Anyone know of this
                                    > (seemingly) dis-continued black rum? Appleton is a historic
                                    > (mid-1700's) affair and still uses the same cane fields as well as
                                    > (until recently, anyway) using a "noser" to manage its' blends. I
                                    > always like to think that my rum was made from direct descendents of
                                    > 1760's cane plants in a descendent of an original 1760's distillery.
                                    > Made it extra-special!
                                    >
                                    > Jim aka kiltiemon (Desperately seeking a source of the above!)
                                    >
                                    > -----Original Message-----
                                    > From: Eric Kelly <rogerscadetcompany@...>
                                    > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Sent: Sun, Feb 28, 2010 11:18 am
                                    > Subject: Re: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                                    >
                                    > There is a rum that my brother brings back from Canada called "Navy
                                    > Rhum" all i can tell you is, I have MANY different rums in my
                                    > time........but none of them actually made me stop and say
                                    > "WOW.....this must have been what Real Grog tasted like!!" As soon as
                                    > i tasted it, it gave me a true sense of what an Old World Authentic
                                    > Rum would have tasted like. I don't know how far back the recipe for
                                    > that goes, but it sure does taste like it was a traditional rum that
                                    > would be right at home aboard a wan-o-war of his majesties navy!
                                    >
                                    > Cheers!
                                    > Eric Kelly
                                    >
                                    > --- On Sat, 2/27/10, bolton1812 <ebolton123@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > From: bolton1812 <ebolton123@...>
                                    > Subject: [Revlist] Rum ( now I'm back in good standings! ; )
                                    > To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                                    > Date: Saturday, February 27, 2010, 6:07 PM
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > List,
                                    > After a discussion with a fellow interpreter I am throwing this out for
                                    > some ideas. For our timeperiod, who today is producing the closest
                                    > camparison to 18th century rum for both taste and color?
                                    > Cheers,
                                    > Bob Bolton
                                    > Pa. Associators
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
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                                    > member photos, FAQ, etc., at
                                    >
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                                    >
                                    > To subscribe to Revlist, please go to the home page at
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