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Re: Marquee center poles

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  • gregsandor
    You could drill a hole a quarter or a third of the diameter of the pole 5 or so into each of the broken ends without removing the remaining splinters. Use a
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 1, 2009
      You could drill a hole a quarter or a third of the diameter of the pole 5" or so into each of the broken ends without removing the remaining splinters. Use a good hide glue, glue a dowel into one end, apply pressure and let dry, then fit and glue the two halves together, again clamping tight. If you don't have a wood shop you might have a local cabinet maker who can do it.

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <warbow67@...> wrote:
      >
      > I just had a center pole snap in half on our small "marquee" (really a diamond/pyramid fly). What would be the best recommendation for a 10 foot center pole for such a use, wood type and dimensions? I have heard everything from sawn lumber like oak to cut maple saplings to laminated poles. I got a twisty pine branch that is long enough but heavy as hell (still green and sappy).
      >
      > Dave H
      > 3NH
      >
    • James Stewart
      Good Day!!! I bought a new single center pole marquee this past spring. From there I had to figure what would be transportable in the 12 9 center pole. I
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 1, 2009
        Good Day!!!

        I bought a new single center pole marquee this past spring. From there I had
        to figure what would be transportable in the 12' 9" center pole. I purchased
        a piece of square box steel that required a 2 - 3/8" square post on the
        inside. It is about 24" long and 1/4" thick wall. I then proceeded to cut
        some white oak boards into the square stock to fit into the box steel piece.
        I placed a carriage bolt in the top portion of the post and steel sleeve
        after painting the sleeve. The lower portion of the post is 8' long and
        slips into the sleeve after waxing it heavily. It requires no bolt since
        gravity and the weight of the marquee holds it together. You might say this
        is over designed and very heavy, but I know it will not give me any problems
        under normal weather conditions we experience at most reenactments.

        I hope this helps.

        Thank you again...
        Your Most Humble and Obedient Servant...
        Peace,
        James - (Seamus) in the Celtic world
        Ye Olde 18th C Sign Carver
        Indentured to my Master for God only knows how long...
        Woods Unlimited by James Stewart
        18 Scenic Circle
        Rochester, New York 14624-1008
        585-594-9663
        www.woodsunltd.com
        james@...
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Revlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Revlist@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
        gregsandor
        Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 5:13 AM
        To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Revlist] Re: Marquee center poles





        You could drill a hole a quarter or a third of the diameter of the pole 5"
        or so into each of the broken ends without removing the remaining splinters.
        Use a good hide glue, glue a dowel into one end, apply pressure and let dry,
        then fit and glue the two halves together, again clamping tight. If you
        don't have a wood shop you might have a local cabinet maker who can do it.

        --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "Dave" <warbow67@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just had a center pole snap in half on our small "marquee" (really a
        diamond/pyramid fly). What would be the best recommendation for a 10 foot
        center pole for such a use, wood type and dimensions? I have heard
        everything from sawn lumber like oak to cut maple saplings to laminated
        poles. I got a twisty pine branch that is long enough but heavy as hell
        (still green and sappy).
        >
        > Dave H
        > 3NH
        >






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tw Moran
        I built my poles such that they telescope. A clear pine laminated 2 by 2 center rides in a 5/4s pine box. Down it is 8 . up it s 13 6 . It uses an internal
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 1, 2009
          I built my poles such that they telescope. A clear pine laminated 2" by
          2" center rides in a 5/4s pine box. Down it is 8'. up it's 13' 6'.
          It uses an internal pulley and rope to raise it.
          It was getting to be to much to try and raise two thirteen foot poles
          by my self.
          With these and the specially designed ridge pole ends. Steel plates
          on top of the ridge pole with holes in them for the uprights' pins: I
          can have as much as 160 degrees of swivel and not twist the ridge pole
          while I am lifting the uprights into place.
          If your interested in the plans, contact me off list and I will send
          you drawings of how they are built.

          Tw twmoran@...

          Dave wrote:
          > I just had a center pole snap in half on our small "marquee" (really
          > a diamond/pyramid fly). What would be the best recommendation for a
          > 10 foot center pole for such a use, wood type and dimensions? I have
          > heard everything from sawn lumber like oak to cut maple saplings to
          > laminated poles. I got a twisty pine branch that is long enough but
          > heavy as hell (still green and sappy).
          >
          > Dave H 3NH
          >
          >
          >
        • Dave
          ... *************************************** The original pole is garbage, an ancient 2X4 that is rotted and has now been disposed of. It was a rush application
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 2, 2009
            --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "gregsandor" <gregory_sandor@...> wrote:
            >
            > You could drill a hole a quarter or a third of the diameter of the pole 5" or so into each of the broken ends without removing the remaining splinters. Use a good hide glue, glue a dowel into one end, apply pressure and let dry, then fit and glue the two halves together, again clamping tight. If you don't have a wood shop you might have a local cabinet maker who can do it.

            ***************************************

            The original pole is garbage, an ancient 2X4 that is rotted and has now been disposed of. It was a rush application when the canvas was first bought.

            Dave H
            3NH
          • Dave
            Well thank you everyone, but I am not interested in a sectional pole, it is only 10 feet, transport is not a problem. What I am looking for is advice on
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 2, 2009
              Well thank you everyone, but I am not interested in a sectional pole, it is only 10 feet, transport is not a problem. What I am looking for is advice on material, Maple Sapling VS Lumbered Oak VS Pine Branch VS Laminated Lumber (glued and screwed 2x4s), etc, etc.

              Plus what cross-section dimensions are best to carry the weight load? A 2x2 is not a real 2x2, it is 1.5"X1.5" and I am not sure that it is sufficient to bear the weight load. So I considered cutting a full 2.5"x2.5", yet there are associated problems with getting the lumber (clear, free of knots, and left over wood from a full width plank). Another option is to take a pair of pine 2x4s and glue and screw them together then mill it down to size.

              So what is the best option?

              Dave H
              3NH




              ********************************************


              --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Tw Moran <twmoran@...> wrote:

              > I built my poles such that they telescope. A clear pine laminated 2" by
              > 2" center rides in a 5/4s pine box. Down it is 8'. up it's 13' 6'.
              > It uses an internal pulley and rope to raise it.
              > It was getting to be to much to try and raise two thirteen foot poles
              > by my self.
              > With these and the specially designed ridge pole ends. Steel plates
              > on top of the ridge pole with holes in them for the uprights' pins: I
              > can have as much as 160 degrees of swivel and not twist the ridge pole
              > while I am lifting the uprights into place.
              > If your interested in the plans, contact me off list and I will send
              > you drawings of how they are built.
              >
              > Tw twmoran@...
              >
              > Dave wrote:
              > > I just had a center pole snap in half on our small "marquee" (really
              > > a diamond/pyramid fly). What would be the best recommendation for a
              > > 10 foot center pole for such a use, wood type and dimensions? I have
              > > heard everything from sawn lumber like oak to cut maple saplings to
              > > laminated poles. I got a twisty pine branch that is long enough but
              > > heavy as hell (still green and sappy).
              > >
              > > Dave H 3NH
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
            • Tw Moran
              One ten foot clear pine 6/4 s thick by 6 inches. Cut in half lengthwise. glue and dowel matching faces together. Thus as it tries to warp the to halves will
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 2, 2009
                One ten foot clear pine 6/4's thick by 6 inches. Cut in half lengthwise.
                glue and dowel matching faces together. Thus as it tries to warp the
                to halves will cancel each other out. More than strong enough and still
                light.
                T

                Dave wrote:
                > Well thank you everyone, but I am not interested in a sectional pole, it is only 10 feet, transport is not a problem. What I am looking for is advice on material, Maple Sapling VS Lumbered Oak VS Pine Branch VS Laminated Lumber (glued and screwed 2x4s), etc, etc.
                >
                > Plus what cross-section dimensions are best to carry the weight load? A 2x2 is not a real 2x2, it is 1.5"X1.5" and I am not sure that it is sufficient to bear the weight load. So I considered cutting a full 2.5"x2.5", yet there are associated problems with getting the lumber (clear, free of knots, and left over wood from a full width plank). Another option is to take a pair of pine 2x4s and glue and screw them together then mill it down to size.
                >
                > So what is the best option?
                >
                > Dave H
                > 3NH
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ********************************************
                >
                >
                > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Tw Moran <twmoran@...> wrote:
                >
                >> I built my poles such that they telescope. A clear pine laminated 2" by
                >> 2" center rides in a 5/4s pine box. Down it is 8'. up it's 13' 6'.
                >> It uses an internal pulley and rope to raise it.
                >> It was getting to be to much to try and raise two thirteen foot poles
                >> by my self.
                >> With these and the specially designed ridge pole ends. Steel plates
                >> on top of the ridge pole with holes in them for the uprights' pins: I
                >> can have as much as 160 degrees of swivel and not twist the ridge pole
                >> while I am lifting the uprights into place.
                >> If your interested in the plans, contact me off list and I will send
                >> you drawings of how they are built.
                >>
                >> Tw twmoran@...
                >>
                >> Dave wrote:
                >>> I just had a center pole snap in half on our small "marquee" (really
                >>> a diamond/pyramid fly). What would be the best recommendation for a
                >>> 10 foot center pole for such a use, wood type and dimensions? I have
                >>> heard everything from sawn lumber like oak to cut maple saplings to
                >>> laminated poles. I got a twisty pine branch that is long enough but
                >>> heavy as hell (still green and sappy).
                >>>
                >>> Dave H 3NH
                >>>
                >>>
                >>>
                >
                >
                >
              • Sgt42RHR@aol.com
                Dave, no need to go over the top here. We have very big marquee supported by two center poles. Each is 2 octagonal oak. They are many years old and are
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 2, 2009
                  Dave, no need to go over the top here. We have very big marquee supported
                  by two center poles. Each is 2" octagonal oak. They are many years old
                  and are solid as can be. Simple and easy--and strong.

                  Cheers,
                  John

                  John M. Johnston,
                  "There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness." Dave Barry
                  **************An Excellent Credit Score is 750. See Yours in Just 2 Easy
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                  eExcfooterNO62)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Dan H
                  I use a fairly straight hemlock pole, I found a sapling the diameter I wanted, cut it down, cut the bark off, when it dried it is pretty strong, and fairly
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 3, 2009
                    I use a fairly straight hemlock pole, I
                    found a sapling the diameter I wanted, cut it down, cut the bark off, when it dried it is pretty strong, and fairly light, and FREE.
                    Dan H



                    ________________________________
                    From: Dave <warbow67@...>
                    To: Revlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, June 2, 2009 8:44:57 AM
                    Subject: [Revlist] Re: Telescoping Marquee center poles





                    Well thank you everyone, but I am not interested in a sectional pole, it is only 10 feet, transport is not a problem. What I am looking for is advice on material, Maple Sapling VS Lumbered Oak VS Pine Branch VS Laminated Lumber (glued and screwed 2x4s), etc, etc.

                    Plus what cross-section dimensions are best to carry the weight load? A 2x2 is not a real 2x2, it is 1.5"X1.5" and I am not sure that it is sufficient to bear the weight load. So I considered cutting a full 2.5"x2.5", yet there are associated problems with getting the lumber (clear, free of knots, and left over wood from a full width plank). Another option is to take a pair of pine 2x4s and glue and screw them together then mill it down to size.

                    So what is the best option?

                    Dave H
                    3NH

                    ************ ********* ********* ********* *****

                    --- In Revlist@yahoogroups .com, Tw Moran <twmoran@... > wrote:

                    > I built my poles such that they telescope.. A clear pine laminated 2" by
                    > 2" center rides in a 5/4s pine box. Down it is 8'. up it's 13' 6'.
                    > It uses an internal pulley and rope to raise it.
                    > It was getting to be to much to try and raise two thirteen foot poles
                    > by my self.
                    > With these and the specially designed ridge pole ends. Steel plates
                    > on top of the ridge pole with holes in them for the uprights' pins: I
                    > can have as much as 160 degrees of swivel and not twist the ridge pole
                    > while I am lifting the uprights into place.
                    > If your interested in the plans, contact me off list and I will send
                    > you drawings of how they are built.
                    >
                    > Tw twmoran@...
                    >
                    > Dave wrote:
                    > > I just had a center pole snap in half on our small "marquee" (really
                    > > a diamond/pyramid fly). What would be the best recommendation for a
                    > > 10 foot center pole for such a use, wood type and dimensions? I have
                    > > heard everything from sawn lumber like oak to cut maple saplings to
                    > > laminated poles. I got a twisty pine branch that is long enough but
                    > > heavy as hell (still green and sappy).
                    > >
                    > > Dave H 3NH
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >







                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • ByTheProlong@aol.com
                    It all depends on what they are going to support. No snow load? Will the rain fall off? Wind is a function of the ropes. All you need to do is hold up the
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 28, 2009
                      It all depends on what they are going to support. No snow load? Will the
                      rain fall off? Wind is a function of the ropes. All you need to do is hold
                      up the fabric.

                      Ed Magiera


                      In a message dated 6/2/2009 11:19:20 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      Sgt42RHR@... writes:

                      Dave, no need to go over the top here. We have very big marquee
                      supported
                      by two center poles. Each is 2" octagonal oak. They are many years old
                      and are solid as can be. Simple and easy--and strong.





                      **************Make your summer sizzle with fast and easy recipes for the
                      grill. (http://food.aol.com/grilling?ncid=emlcntusfood00000005)


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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